Native Peoples of Eastern North America to 1820:

A Select Bibliography

Despite the fact that many items defy easy categorization, each book or article is listed only once. Most of the subject headings are keyed to the History 610 syllabus, but some additional categories are included.



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General Reference Works

Kathleen J. Bragdon, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast (New York, 2001).

Lyle Campbell, American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America (New York, 1997).

Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast
(New York, 2001).

William C. Sturtevant, gen. ed., Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. XV: Northeast, ed. Bruce G. Trigger (Washington, D.C., 1978).

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, et al., eds., Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History (Norman, Okla., 1987).

Bruce G. Trigger and Wilcomb E. Washburn, eds., The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas: vol. I: North America, Part 1 (Cambridge, 1996).


Native American History: Methods and Problems

Books:

Robert F. Berkhofer, The White Man's Indian: Images of the American Indian from Columbus to the Present (New York, 1978).

Colin G. Calloway, New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remaking of Early America(Baltimore, 1997).

Vine Deloria, Jr., Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto (Norman, Okla., 1988 [orig. publ. 1969]).

Donald Lee Fixico, ed., Rethinking American Indian History (Albuquerque, N.M., 1997).

Francis Jennings, The Invasion of America: Indians, Colonialism, and the Cant of Conquest(Chapel Hill, N.C., 1975), part I.

Calvin Martin, ed., The American Indian and the Problem of History (New York, 1987).

Calvin Martin, The Way of the Human Being (New Haven, 1999)

Devon A. Mihesuah, Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians (Lincoln, Neb., 1998).

David Murray, Forked Tongues: Speech, Writing, and Representation in North American Indian Texts (Bloomington, Ind., 1991).

Peter Nabokov, A Forest of Time: American Indian Ways of History (New York, 2002).

Daniel K. Richter, Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America (Cambridge, Mass., 2001)

Nancy Shoemaker, ed., Clearing a Path: Theorizing the Past in Native American Studies (New York, 2002)

Georges E. Sioui, For an Amerindian Autohistory: An Essay on the Foundations of a Social Ethic, trans. Sheila Fischman (Montreal, 1992).

Articles:

James Axtell, "Colonial America without the Indians: Counterfactual Reflections," Journal of American History, LXXIII (1986-1987).

James Axtell, "Ethnohistory: An Historian's Viewpoint, from Ethnohistory, XXVI (1979), 1-13.

James Axtell, "The Scholar's Obligations to Native Peoples," in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 244-253.

James Axtell and William C. Sturtevant, "The Unkindest Cut, or Who Invented Scalping?" William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXXVI (1980), 451-472.

Donald M. Bahr, “Bad News: The Predicament of Native American Mythology,” Ethnohistory, 48 (2001), 587-612.

Robert F., Berkhofer, Jr., "The Political Context of a New Indian History," Pacific Historical Review, XL (1971), 357-382.

James Taylor Carson, “Ethnogeography and the Native American Past,” Ethnohistory 49 (2002) 769-788.

Ward Churchill,"The Crucible of American Indian Identity: Native Tradition versus Colonial Imposition in Postconquest North America," American Indian Culture and Research Journal XXIII, No. 1 (1999)

Raymond D. Fogelson, “The Ethnohistory of Events and Nonevents,” Ethnohistory, 36 (1989), 133-147.

James A. Hijiya, "Why the West Is Lost," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LI (1992), 285-287.

James H. Merrell, "Some Thoughts on Colonial Historians and American Indians," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XLVI (1989),

Devon A. Mihusuah, “Suggested Guidelines for Institutions with Scholars Who Conduct Research on American Indians,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 17 (1993), 131-139.

Peter Nabokov, "Native Views of History," in Bruce G. Trigger and Wilcomb E. Washburn, eds., The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas: vol. I: North America, Part 1 (Cambridge, 1996), 1-60.

Daniel K. Richter, "Whose Indian History?" ibid., 3d ser., L (1993), 379-393.

David E. Stannard, "The Invisible People of Early American History," American Quarterly, XXXIX (1987), 649-655.

Michael Yellow Bird.  "What We Want to Be Called: Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives on Racial and Ethnic Identity Labels."  American Indian Quarterly,  23 (1999).

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From "Pre-History" to "History": Evidence, Methods, Interpretation

Books:

James W. Bradley, Evolution of the Onondaga Iroquois: Accommodating Change, 1500-1655(Syracuse, N.Y., 1987).

Sally A. Kitt Chappell, Cahokia: Mirror of the Cosmos (Chicago, 2002)..

Jay F. Custer, Prehistoric Cultures of Eastern Pennsylvania, Archaeological Series no. 7 (Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1996).

Thomas E. Emerson, Cahokia and the Archaeology of Power (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1997).

Thomas E. Emerson, and R. Barry Lewis, eds., Cahokia and the Hinterlands: Middle Mississippian Cultures of the Midwest (Urbana, Ill., 1991).

Thomas E. Emerson, Dale L. McElrath, and Andrew C. Fortier, eds., Late Woodland Societies: Tradition and Transformation across the Mid-Continent (Lincoln, Neb., 2000).

William Engelbrecht, Iroquoia: The Development of a Native World (Syracuse, N.Y., 2003).

Patricia Galloway, Choctaw Genesis, 1500-1700 (Lincoln, Neb., 1995)

Patricia Galloway, ed., The Hernando de Soto Expedition: History, Historiography, and 'Discovery' in the Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1997).

Charles M. Hudson, Conversations with the High Priest of Coosa (Chapel Hill, N.C., 2003)

Charles M. Hudson, Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando de Soto and the South's Ancient Chiefdoms (Athens, Ga., 1997).

R. Douglas Hurt, Indian Agriculture in America: Prehistory to the Present (Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 1987)

Alice Beck Kehoe, America before the European Invasions (New York, 2002).

Barry C. Kent, Susquehanna's Indians (Harrisburg, Pa., 1984).

Adam King, Etowah: The Political History of a Chiefdom Capital (Tuscaloosa, Ala., 2003).

Barbara Alice Mann, Native Americans, Archaeologists, and the Mounds (New York, 2003).

Bonnie G. McEwan,, ed., Indians of the Greater Southeast: Historical Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Gainesville, Fla., 2000).

William E. McGoun, Ancient Miamians: The Tequesta of South Florida (Gainesville, Fla., 2002).

Mark W. Mehrer, Cahokia's Countryside: Household Archaeology, Settlement Patterns, and Social Power (DeKalb, Ill., 1995).

Timothy R. Pauketat, Ancient Cahokia and the Mississippians (Cambridge, 2004)

Timothy R. Pauketat and Thomas E. Emerson, eds. Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World (Lincoln, Neb., 1997).

Stephen R. Potter, Commoners, Tribute, and Chiefs: The Development of Algonquian Culture in the Potomac Valley (Charlottesville, Va., 1993).

J. Daniel Rogers and Bruce D. Smith, eds. Mississippian Communities and Households(Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1995).

Helen C. Rountree and E. Randolph Turner, III, Before and After Jamestown: Virginia's Powhatans and Their Predecessors (Gainesville, Fla., 2002).

Bruce D. Smith, ed., The Mississippian Emergence (Washington, D.C., 1990)

Marvin T. Smith, Coosa: The Rise and Fall of a Southeastern Mississippian Chiefdom (Gainesville, Fla., 2000)

James A. Tuck, Onondaga Iroquois Prehistory: A Study in Settlement Archaeology (Syracuse, N.Y., 1971).

Articles:

James Axtell, "Imagining the Other: First Encounters in North America," in Axtell, Beyond 1492: Encounters in Colonial North America (New York, 1992), 25-74.

James Axtell, "The Exploration of Norumbega: Native Perspectives," in Axtell, Beyond 1492: Encounters in Colonial North America (New York, 1992), 75-96.

James Axtell, "Native Reactions to the Invasion of America," in Axtell, Beyond 1492: Encounters in Colonial North America (New York, 1992), 97-121.

Robin A. Beck, Jr., “Consolidation and Hierarchy: Chiefdom Variability in the Mississippian Southeast,” American Antiquity, 68(2003), 641-661.

Marshall Joseph Becker, "Lenape Population at the Time of European Contact: Estimating Native Numbers in the Lower Delaware Valley," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society133 (1989), 112-122.

John H. Blitz, "Big Pots for Big Shots: Feasting and Storage in a Mississippian Community," American Antiquity, LVIII (1993), 80-96.

Charles R. Cobb and Brian M. Butler, “The Vacant Quarter Revisited: Late Mississippian Abandonment of the Lower Ohio Valley,” American Antiquity, 67(2002), 625-641.

Linda S. Cordell and Bruce D. Smith, "Indigenous Farmers," in Bruce G. Trigger and Wilcomb E. Washburn, eds., The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas, vol. 1, North America (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pt. 1, pp. 247-248.

Kenneth L. Feder, "The Spanish Entrada: A Model for Assessing Claims of Pre-Columbian Contact between the Old and New Worlds," North Ameerican Archaeologist, XV (1994).

Gayle J. Fritz and Bruce D. Smith, "Old Collections and New Technology: Documenting the Domestication of Chenopodium in Eastern North America," Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology, XIII (1988), 3-27.

James B. Griffin, "Cahokia Interaction with Contemporary Southeastern and Eastern Societies," Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology, XVIII (1993), 3-17.

George R. Hamell, "Mythical Realities and European Contact in the Northeast during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries," Man in the Northeast, no. 33 (1987), 63-87.

Susan Kalter, “‘America's Histories’ Revisited: the Case of Tell Them They Lie,” American Indian Quarterly, 25 (2001), 329-351.

Jordan E. Kerber, "Interpreting Diverse Marine Shell Deposits of the Woodland Period in New England and New York: Interrelationships among Subsistence, Symbolism, and Ceremonialism," Northeast Anthropology, No.57 (Spring 1999) 57-68 .

Tristram R. Kidder, "Timing And Consequences of The Introduction of Maize Agriculture in The Lower Mississippi Valley," North American Archaeologist, XIII (1992), 15-41.

W. Fred Kinsey, "Eastern Pennsylvania Prehistory: A Review," Pennsylvania History, L (1983), 71, 79-80.

Herbert S.  Klein, and Daniel C. Schiffner, “The Current Debate about the Origins of the Paleoindians of America,” Journal of Social History, 37(2003), 483-492.

Vernon James Knight, Jr., "The Formation of the Creeks," in Charles Hudson and Carmen Chaves Tesser, eds., The Forgotten Centuries: Indians and Europeans in the American South, 1521-1704 (Athens, Georgia, 1994), 373-92.

Vernon James Knight, Jr., "The Institutional Organization of Mississippian Religion," American Antiquity, LI (1986), 675-687.

Vernon James Knight, Jr., "The Symbolism of Mississippian Mounds," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 279-291.

George R. Milner, "Mississippian Period Population Density in a Segment of the Central Mississippi River Valley," American Antiquity, LI (1986), 227-238.

Jay Miller, “Instilling the Earth: Explaining Mounds,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 25 (2001), 161-177.

Patricia J. O'Brien and William P. McHugh, "Mississippian Solstice Shrines and a Cahokian Calendar: an Hypothesis Based on Ethnohistory and Archaeology," North American Archaeologist, VIII (1987), 227-247.

Timothy R. Pauketat and Thomas E. Emerson, "The Ideology of Authority And The Power of The Pot," American Anthropologist, XCIII (1991), 919-941.

Neal Salisbury, "The Indians' Old World: Native Americans and the Coming of Europeans," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LIII (1996), 435-458.

Christopher Vecsey, "The Story and Structure of the Iroquois Confederacy," Journal of the American Academy of Religion, LIV (1986), 79-106.

Anthony F. C. Wallace, "The Dekanawideh Myth Analyzed as the Record of a Revitalization Movement," Ethnohistory, V (1958), 129-139.

Gregory Waselkov, "Prehistoric Agriculture in The Mississippi Valley," Agricultural History, (1977), 513-519.

John Witthoft, "Ancestry of the Susquehannocks," in Witthoft and W. Fred Kinsey, eds., Susquehannock Miscellany (Harrisburg, Pa., 1959).

Charles F. Wray and Harry L. Schoff, "A Preliminary Report on the Seneca Sequence in Western New York, 1550-1687," Pennsylvania Archaeologist, XXIII, no. 2 (July 1953), 53-63.

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Ecological and Biological Issues

Books:

Noble David Cook, Born to Die: Disease and New World Conquest, 1492-1650 (Cambridge, 1998)

Sherburne F. Cook, The Indian Population of New England in the Seventeenth Century(Berkeley, Calif., 1976).

William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Making of New England (New York, 1983).

Alfred W. Crosby, Jr., The Columbian Exchange: Biological Consequences of 1492 (Westport, Conn., 1972).

Alfred W. Crosby, Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900(Cambridge, 1986).

Henry F. Dobyns, Their Number Become Thinned: Native American Population Dynamics in Eastern North America (Knoxville, Tenn., 1983).

David Henige, Numbers from Nowhere: The American Indian Contact Population Debate (Norman, Okla., 1998)

Shepard Krech III, The Ecological Indian: Myth and History (New York, 1999)

Calvin Martin, Keepers of the Game: Indian-Animal Relationships and the Fur Trade (Berkeley, 1978).

Carolyn Merchant, Ecological Revolutions: Nature, Gender, and Science in New England, (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1989).

Ann F. Ramenofsky, Vectors of Death: The Archaeology of European Contact (Albuquerque, N.M., 1987).

Timothy Silver, A New Face on the Countryside: Indians, Colonists, and Slaves in South Atlantic Forests, 1500-1800 (Cambridge, 1990).

David E. Stannard, American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World(New York, 1992).

Russell Thornton, American Indian Holocaust and Survival: A Population History since 1492(Norman, Okla., 1987).

Articles:

"Commentary on Native American Demography," Ethnohistory, XXXVI (1989), 285-307.

Sherburne F. Cook,"Interracial Warfare and Population Decline among the New England Indians," Ethnohistory, XX (1973), 1-24.

Sherburne F. Cook, "The Significance of Disease in the Extinction of the New England Indians," Human Biology, XLIV (1973), 485-508.

Alfred W. Crosby, "Virgin Soil Epidemics as a Factor in the Aboriginal Depopulation in America," WMQ, XXX (1976), 176-207.

Henry F. Dobyns, "Estimating Aboriginal American Population: An Appraisal of Techniques with a New Hemispheric Estimate," Current Anthropology, VII (1966), 395-415.

David Henige, "Primary Source by Primary Source?: On the Role of Epidemics in New World Depopulation," Ethnohistory, XXXIII (1986), 293-312.

David S. Jones, “Virgin Soils Revisited,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 60 (2003), 703-742.

Paul Kelton, “Avoiding the Smallpox Spirits: Colonial Epidemics and Southeastern Indian Survival,” Ethnohistory 51 (2004) 45-71.

Daniel K. Richter, "War and Culture: The Iroquois Experience," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XL (1983), 529-537.

Dean R. Snow and Kim M. Lanphear, "European Contact and Indian Depopulation in the Northeast: The Timing of the First Epidemics," Ethnohistory, XXXV (1988), 15-33.

Dean R. Snow and William A. Starna, "Sixteenth-Century Depopulation: A View from the Mohawk Valley," American Anthropologist, XCI (1989), 142-149.

William A. Starna, "Mohawk Iroquois Population: A Revision," Ethnohistory, XXVII (1980), 371-382.

Peter A. Thomas, “Contrastive Subsistence Strategies and Land Use Factors for Understanding Indian-White Relations in New England,” Ethnohistory, XXIII (1976), 1-18.

Bruce G. Trigger, "Ontario Native People and the Epidemics of 1634-1640," in Shepard Krech, III, ed., Indians, Animals, and the Fur Trade: A Critique of Keepers of the Game (Athens, Ga., 1981).

Marvin T. Smith, "Aboriginal Depopulation in the Postcontact Southeast," in Charles Hudson and Carmen Chaves Tesser, eds., The Forgotten Centuries: Indians and Europeans in the American South, 1521-1704 (Athens, Georgia, 1994), 257-275.

Peter H. Wood, "The Changing Population of the Colonial South: An Overview by Race and Region, 1685-1790," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 35-103.

Peter Wood, "The Impact of Smallpox on the Native Population of the 18th Century South," New York State Journal of Medicine, LXXXVII (1987), 30-36.

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Cultural and Political Encounters

THE CHESAPEAKE (see also below):

Books:

Martin Gallivan, James River Chiefdoms: The Rise of Social Inequality in the Chesapeake (Lincoln, Neb., 2003).

Frederic W. Gleach, Powhatan's World and Colonial Virginia: A Conflict of Cultures (Lincoln, Neb., 1997).

Karen Ordahl Kupperman, Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America (Ithaca, N. Y., 2000).

J. A. Leo LeMay, Did Pocahontas Save Captain John Smith? (Athens, Ga., 1992).

Helen Rountree, The Powhatan Indians of Virginia: Their Traditional Culture (Norman, Oklahoma, 1989)

Helen C. Rountree, Pocahontas's People The Powhatan Indians of Virginia through Four Centuries (Norman, Okla., 1990).

Robert S. Tilton, Pocahontas: The Evolution of an American Narrative (New York: Cambridge U. Press, 1994), 186.

Camilla Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma (New York: Hill and Wang, 2004)

Margaret Holmes Williamson, Powhatan Lords of Life and Death: Command and Consent in Seventeenth-Century Virginia (Lincoln, Neb., 2003).

Articles:

James Axtell, "The Rise and Fall of the Powhatan Empire," in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 182-221.

Kathleen M. Brown, "The Anglo-Indian Gender Frontier," in Brown, Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1996), Ch. 2.

J. Frederick Fausz, "Fighting 'Fire' with Firearms: The Anglo-Powhatan Arms Race in Early Virginia," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, III, no. 4 (1979),

J. Frederick Fausz, "Opechancanough: Indian Resistance Leader," in David G. Sweet and Gary B. Nash, eds., Struggle and Survival in Colonial America(Berkeley, Calif., 1981), 21-37.

Frederic W. Gleach, "Controlled Speculation: Interpreting the Saga of Pocahontas and Captain John Smith," in Jennifer S. H. Brown and Elizabeth Vibert, eds., Reading Beyond Words: Contexts for Native History(Peterborough, Ont., 1996).

Stephen R. Potter, "Early English Effects on Virginia Algonquian Exchange and Tribute in the Tidewater Potomac," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 151-172.

Martin H. Quitt, "Trade and Acculturation at Jamestown, 1607-1609: The Limits of Understanding, William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LII (1995), 227-258.

Helen C. Roundtree, "Powhatan Indian Women: The People Captain John Smith Barely Saw," Ethnohistory, XLV (1998), 1-29.

Alden T. Vaughan, "Expulsion of the Salvages: English Policy and the Virginia Massacre of 1622," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXXV (1978), 57-84.

Alden T. Vaughan, “Sir Walter Ralegh’s Indian Interpreters, 1584–1618,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 59 (2002), 341-376.
 

NEW ENGLAND (see also below):

Books:

Kathleen J. Bragdon, Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650 (Norman, Okla., 1996).

Alfred A. Cave, The Pequot War (Amherst, Massachusetts, 1996)

Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney, Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Amherst, Mass., 2003).

Francis Jennings, The Invasion of America: Indians, Colonialism, and the Cant of Conquest(Chapel Hill, N.C., 1975), part II.

Michael Leroy Oberg, Uncas: First of the Mohegans (Ithaca, N.Y., 2003).

Ann Marie Plane, Colonial Intimacies: Indian Marriage in Early New England (Ithaca, N.Y., 2000)

Howard S. Russell, Indian New England before the Mayflower (Hanover, N.H., 1980).

Neal Salisbury, Manitou and Providence: Indians, Europeans, and the Making of New England, 1500-1643 (New York, 1982).

William S. Simmons, Spirit of the New England Tribes: Indian History and Folklore, 1620-1984(Hanover, N.H., 1986).

Articles:

Kathleen Bragdon, "Gender as a Social Category in Southern New England," Ethnohistory, XLIII (1996), 573-592.

Timothy Bratton, "The Identity of the New England Indian Epidemic of 1616-19," Bulletin of the History of Medicine, LXII (1988), 351-388.

Adam J. Hirsch, "The Collision of Military Cultures in Seventeenth-Century New England," Journal of American History, LXXIV (1988), 1187-1212.

Eric S. Johnson, "Uncas and the Politics of Contact," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 29-47.

Stephen T. Katz, "The Pequot War Reconsidered," New England Quarterly, LXIV ('99'), 106-224.

Paul A. Robinson, "Lost Opportunities: Miantonomi and the English in Seventeenth-Century Narragansett Country," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816(Amherst, Mass., 1996), 13-28.

Neal Salisbury, "Squanto, Last of the Patuxets," in David G. Sweet and Gary B. Nash, eds., Struggle and Survival in Colonial America (Berkeley, Calif., 1981), 228-245.

Bryce Speiss, "New England Pandemic of 1616-1620: Cause and Archaeological Interpretation," Man in the Northeast, XXIV (1987), 71-83.

Alden T. Vaughan, "Pequots and Puritans: The Causes of the War, 1637," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d. ser., XXI (1969), 256-269.

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The Meeting of Native and Atlantic Economies

Books:

Kathryn E. Holland Braund, Deerskins and Duffels: Creek Indian Trade with Anglo-America, 1685-1815 (Lincoln, Neb., 1993).

Jennifer S. H. Brown, Strangers in Blood: Fur Trade Company Families in Indian Country(Vancouver, British Columbia, 1980).

Denys Delâge, Le pays renversé: Amérindiens et européens en Amérique du nord-est, 1600-1664(Montreal, 1985). Published in English as Bitter Feast: Amerindians and Europeans in Northeastern North America, 1600-64, trans. Jane Brierley (Vancouver, B.C., 1993).

Daniel Francis and Toby Morantz, Partners in Furs: A History of the Fur Trade in Eastern James Bay, 1600-1870 (Kingston, Ont., 1983).

Alan Gallay, The Indian Slave Trade: The Rise of the English Empire in the American South, 1670–1717 (New Haven, Conn., 2002).

George T. Hunt, The Wars of the Iroquois: A Study in Intertribal Trade Relations (Madison, Wis., 1940).

Harold A. Innis, The Fur Trade in Canada: An Introduction to Canadian Economic History(New Haven, Conn., 1930).

Peter C. Mancall, Deadly Medicine: Indians and Alcohol in Early America(Ithaca, N.Y., 1995).

Michael P. Morris, The Bringing of Wonder: Trade and the Indians of the Southeast, 1700-1783
(Westport, Conn., 1999).

Thomas Elliot Norton, The Fur Trade in Colonial New York, 1686-1776(Madison, Wis., 1974).

George I. Quimby, Indian Culture and European Trade Goods: The Archaeology of the Historic Period in the Western Great Lakes Region (Madison, Wis., 1966).

Articles:

James Axtell, "The First Consumer Revolution," in Axtell, Beyond 1492: Encounters in Colonial North America (New York, 1992), 125-151.

James Axtell, "Last Rights: The Acculturation of Native Funerals in Colonial North America," in Axtell, The European and the Indian: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America(New York, 1981), 110-128.

James Axtell, "At the Water's Edge: Trading in the Sixteenth Century," in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 144-181.

Mary Black-Rogers, "Varieties of 'Starving': Semantics and Survival in the Subarctic Fur Trade, 1750-1850," Ethnohistory, 33 (Fall 1986), 353-383

James W. Bradley, "Iron Work in Onondaga, 1550-1650," in Nancy Bonvillain, ed., Studies on Iroquoian Culture (Rindge, N.H., 1980), 109-117

James W. Bradley, "Native Exchange and European Trade: Cross Cultural Dynamics in the Sixteenth Century, Man in the Northeast, no. 33 (1987), 31-46.

Elise M. Brenner, "Sociopolitical Implications of Mortuary Remains in 17th-Century Native Southern New England," in Mark P. Leone and Parker B. Potter, eds., The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States (Washington, D.C., 1988), 154-174.

Judith K. Brown, "Economic Organization and the Position of Women among the Iroquois," Ethnohistory, XVII (1970), 151-167.

Lynn Ceci, "The Value of Wampum among the New York Iroquois: A Case Study in Artifact Analysis," Journal of Anthropological Research, XXXVIII (1982), 97-107.

W. J. Eccles, "A Belated Review of Harold Adams Innis, The Fur Trade in Canada," Canadian Historical Review, LX (1979).

Thomas Hall and Christopher Chase-Dunn, "World-Systems in North America: Networks, Rise and Fall and Pulsations of Trade in Stateless Systems," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, XXII, No. 1 (1998)

Mary W. Herman, "The Social Aspect of Huron Property," American Anthropologist, LVIII (1956), 1044-1058.

Calvin Martin, "The Four Lives of a Micmac Copper Pot," Ethnohistory, XX (1975).

James H. Merrell, "'Our Bond of Peace': Patterns of Intercultural Exchange in the Carolina Piedmont," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast(Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 196-222.

Christopher L. Miller and George R. Hamell, "A New Perspective on Indian-White Contact: Cultural Symbols and Colonial Trade," Journal of American History, LXXIII (1986), 311-328.

Arthur J. Ray, "Indians as Consumers in the Eighteenth Century," in Carol Judd and Arthur J. Ray, eds., Old Trails and New Directions: Papers of the Third North American Fur Trade Conference (Toronto, 1980), 255-271.

E.E. Rich, "Trade Habits and Economic Motivation among the Indians of North America," Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, 26 (1960), 35-53.

Brett Rushforth, “‘A Little Flesh We Offer You’: The Origins of Indian Slavery in New France,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 60 (2003), 777-808.

Susan Sleeper-Smith, "Women, Kin, and Catholicism: New Perspectives on the Fur Trade," Ethnohistory XLVII (2000), 423-452

Bruce G. Trigger, "The Road to Affluence: A Reassessment of Early Huron Responses to European Contact," In Richard F. Salisbury and Elisabeth Tooker, eds. Affluence and Cultural Survival: 1981 Proceedings of the American Ethnological Society. Washington, D.C., 1984. Pp. 12-25.

Laurier Turgeon, “French Beads in France and Northeastern North America During the Sixteenth Century,” Historical Archaeology, 35 (2001), 58-82.

Laurier Turgeon, "The Tale of the Kettle: Odyssey of an Intercultural Object," Ethnohistory, XLIV (1997), 1-29.

Bruce M. White, "Encounters with Spirits: Ojibwa and Dakota Theories about the French and Their Merchandise,"Ethnohistory, XLI (1994), 369-405.

Bruce White, "'Give Us a Little Milk': The Social and Cultural Meaning of Gift-Giving in the Lake Superior Fur Trade," Minnesota History, 48 (Summer 1982), 60-71.

Bruce White, "The Woman Who Married a Beaver: Trade Patterns and Gender Roles in the Ojibwa Fur Trade," Ethnohistory, XLVI (1999), 109-148.

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Religious Encounters

Books:

James Axtell, The Invasion Within: The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America (New York, 1985).

Robert F. Berkhofer, Jr, Salvation and the Savage: An Analysis of Protestant Missions and American Indian Response, 1787-1862 (Lexington, Ky., 1965).

Carole Blackburn, Harvest of Souls: The Jesuit Missions and Colonialism in North America, 1632–1650 (Montreal, 2000)

Henry Warner Bowden, American Indians and Christian Missions: Studies in Cultural Conflict. (Chicago, 1981).

Kristina Bross, Dry Bones and Indian Sermons: Praying Indians and Colonial American Identity (Ithaca, N.Y., 2004)

Lucien Campeau, Gannentaha: Premère mission iroquoise (1653-1665)(Montreal, Que., 1983).

Richard W. Cogley, John Eliot's Mission to the Indians before King Philip's War (Cambridge, Mass., 1999)

Allan Greer, Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004)

Nicholas Griffiths and Fernando Cervantes, eds., Spiritual Encounters: Interactions between Christianity and Native Religions in Colonial America (Lincoln, Neb., 1999)

W. DeLoss Love, Samson Occom and the Christian Indians of New England (Syracuse, N.Y., 2000).

Dane Morrison, A Praying People: Massachusett Acculturation and the Failure of the Puritan Mission, 1600-1690 (New York, 1995).

Ronald Niezen, Spirit Wars: Native North American Religions in the Age of Nation Building (Berkeley, Calif., 2000)

Bernd C. Peyer, The Tutor'd Mind: Indian Missionary-Writiers in Antebellum America (Amherst, Mass., 1997).

John Steckley, ed. and trans., De Religione: Telling the Seventeenth-Century Jesuit Story in Huron to the Iroquois (Norman, Okla., 2004).

Laura M. Stevens, The Poor Indians: British Missionaries, Native Americans, and Colonial Sensibility (Philadelphia, 2004).

Margaret Connel Szasz, Indian Education in the American Colonies, 1607-1783 (Albuquerque, N.M., 1988).

Alden T. Vaughan, New England Frontier: Puritans and Indians, 1620-1675, 3d ed. (Norman, Okla., 1995).

Hilary E. Wyss, Writing Indians: Literacy, Christianity, and Native Community in Early America (Amherst, Mass., 2000).

Articles:

Takao Abé, “What Determined the Content of Missionary Reports? The Jesuit Relations Compared with the Iberian Jesuit Accounts,” French Colonial History, 3 (2003), 69-83.

James Axtell, "Some Thoughts on the Ethnohistory of Missions," in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 47-57.

James Axtell, "White Legend: The Jesuit Missions in Maryland," in Axtell,After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 73-85.

James Axtell, "The Power of Print in the Eastern Woodlands," in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 86-99.

James Axtell, "Were Indian Conversions Bona Fide?" in Axtell, After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America (New York, 1988), 100-121.

Christopher Bilodeau, “‘They Honor Our Lord among Themselves in Their Own Way’: Colonial Christianity and the Illinois Indians,” American Indian Quarterly, 25 (2001), 352-377.

David Blanchard, " . . . To the Other Side of the Sky: Catholicism at Kahnawake, 1667-1701," Anthropologica, XXIV (1982).

Joanna Brooks, “Six Hymns by Samson Occom,” Early American Literature, 38 (2003), 67-87.

Henry W. Bowden and James P. Ronda, eds., John Eliot's Indian Dialogues: A Study in Cultural Interaction (Westport, Conn., 1980).

Elise Brenner, "To Pray or to Be Prey: That is the Question: Strategies for Cultural Autonomy of Massachusetts Praying Town Indians," Ethnohistory, XXVII (1980), 135-152.

Jennifer S.H. Brown, "Reading Beyond the Missionaries, Dissecting Responses," Ethnohistory, XLIII (1996), 713-719.

Charles L. Cohen, "Conversion among Puritans and Amerindians: A Theological and Cultural Perspective," in Francis J. Bremer, ed., Puritanism: Transatlantic Perspectives on a Seventeenth-Century Anglo-American Faith (Boston, 1993).

Robert Conkling, "Legitimacy and Conversion in Social Change: The Case of French Missionaries and the Northeastern Algonkian," Ethnohistory, 21 (1974), 1-24.

Dorsey, Peter A. “Going to School with Savages: Authorship and Authority among the Jesuits of New France.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 55 (1998), 399-420.

William Hart, “The Kindness of the Blessed Virgin,” in Nicholas Griffiths and Fernando Cervantes, eds., Spiritual Encounters: Interactions between Christianity and Native Religions in Colonial America (Lincoln, Neb., 1999).

Francis Jennings, "Goals and Functions of Puritan Missions to the Indians," Ethnohistory, XVIII (1971), 197-212

K. I. Koppedrayer, "The Making of the First Iroquois Virgin: Early Jesuit Biographies of the Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha," Ethnohistory XL (1993).

Rebecca Kugel, "Of Missionaries and Their Cattle: Ojibwa Perceptions of a Missionary as Evil Shaman,"Ethnohistory, XLI (1994), 227-244.

Jane Merritt, "Dreaming of the Savior's Blood: Moravians and the Indian Great Awakening in Pennsylvania," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LIV (1997), 723-746.

Peter Moogk, “The ‘Others’ Who Never Were: Eastern Woodlands Amerindians and Europeans in the Seventeenth Century,” French Colonial History, 1 (2002), 77-100

Kenneth M. Morrison, "'That Art of Coyning Christians': John Eliot and the Praying Indians of Massachusetts," Ethnohistory, XXI (1974), 77-92.

Robert James Naeher, "Dialogue in the Wilderness: John Eliot and the Indian Exploration of Puritanism as a Source of Meaning, Comfort, and Ethnic Survival," New England Quarterly, LXII (1989).

Daniel K. Richter, "Iroquois versus Iroquois: Jesuit Missions and Christianity in Village Politics, 1642-1686," Ethnohistory, XXXII (1985), 1-16.

James P. Ronda, "Generations of Faith: The Christian Indians of Martha's Vineyard," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXXVIII (1981).

James P. Ronda, "The Sillery Experiment: A Jesuit-Indian Village in New France, 1637-1663," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, III, no. 1 (1979), 1-18.

James P. Ronda, "`We Are Well As We Are': An Indian Critique of Seventeenth-Century Christian Missions," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXXIV (1977), 66-82.

Neal Salisbury, “Embracing Ambiguity: Native Peoples and Christianity in Seventeenth-Century North America,” Ethnohistory 50 (2003) 247-259.

Neal Salisbury, "Red Puritans: The `Praying Indians' of Massachusetts Bay and John Eliot," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXXI (1974), 27-54.

David A Schattschneider, "Moravians Approach the Indians: Theories an Realities," Unitas Fratrum, nos. 21-22 (1987), 37-45.

William S. Simmons, "Red Yankees: Narragansett Conversion in the Great Awakening," American Ethnologist, X (1983), 253-271.

Nancy Shoemaker, "Kateri Tekakwitha's Tortuous Path to Sainthood," in Shoemaker, ed., Negotiators of Change: Historical Perspectives on Native American Women (New York, 1995).

Pauline Turner Strong, "Feminist Theory and the 'Invasion of the Heart' in North America,"Ethnohistory, XLIII (1996), 683-712.

Margaret Connel Szasz, "Samson Occom: Mohegan as Spiritual Intermediary," in Szasz, ed., Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker(Norman, Okla., 1994), 61-78.

Harold W. Van Lonkhuyzen, "A Reappraisal of the Praying Indians: Acculturation, Conversion, and Identity in Natick, Massachusetts, 1646-1730," New England Quarterly, LXIII (1990).

Alden T. Vaughan and Daniel K. Richter, "Crossing the Cultural Divide: Indians and New Englanders, 1605-1763," Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, XC (1980).

Craig White, “The Praying Indians' Speeches as Texts of Massachusett Oral Culture,” Early American Literature, 38 (2003), 437-467

Peter Wogan, "Perceptions of European Literacy in Early Contact Situations,"Ethnohistory, XLI (1994), 407-429.

J. William T. Youngs, "The Indian Saints of Early New England," Early American Literature, XVI (1981-1982).

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Diplomats, Mediators, Brokers, Middlepeople, and Militants

Books:

John Richard Alden, John Stuart and the Southern Colonial Frontier: A Study of Indian Relations, War, Trade, and Land Problems in the Southern Wilderness, 1754-1775 (New York, 1966).

Verner W. Crane, The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732 (New York, 1981 [orig. publ. 1928]), 108-186.

Matthew Dennis, Cultivating a Landscape of Peace: Iroquois-European Encounters in Seventeenth-Century America (Ithaca, N.Y., 1993).

Gregory Evans Dowd, War under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, and the British Empire (Baltimore, 2002).

Randolph C. Downes, Council Fires on the Upper Ohio: A Narrative of Indian Affairs in the Upper Ohio Valley until 1795 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1940).

Gilles Havard, The Great Peace of Montreal of 1701: French-Native Diplomacy in the Seventeenth Century, trans. Phyllis Aronoff  and  Howard Scott (Montreal, 2001).

Eric Hinderaker, Elusive Empires: Constructing Colonialism in the Ohio Valley, 1673-1800(Cambridge, 1997).

Wilbur R. Jacobs, Wilderness Politics and Indian Gifts: The Northern Colonial Frontier, 1748-1763 (Lincoln, Neb., 1966 [orig. publ. 1950]).

Francis Jennings, The Ambiguous Iroquois Empire: The Covenant Chain Confederation of Indian Tribes with English Colonies from Its Beginnings to the Lancaster Treaty of 1744 (New York, 1984).

Francis Jennings, Empire of Fortune: Crowns, Colonies and Tribes in the Seven Years War in America (New York, 1988).

Francis, Jennings, et al, eds., The History and Culture of Iroquois Diplomacy: An Interdisciplinary Guide to the Treaties of the Six Nations and Their League (Syracuse, N.Y., 1985).

Dorothy V. Jones, License for Empire: Colonialism by Treaty in Early America (Chicago, 1982).

James H. Merrell, Into the American Woods: Negotiators on the Pennsylvania Frontier (New York, 1999).

D. Peter MacLeod, The Canadian Iroquois and the Seven Years' War (Toronto, 1996).

Jane T. Merritt, At the Crossroads: Indians and Empires on a Mid-Atlantic Frontier, 1700–1763 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 2003).

June Namias, White Captivities: Gender and Ethnicity on the American Frontier (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1995).

Larry L. Nelson, A Man of Distinction among Them: Alexander McKee and British-Indian Affairs along the Ohio Country Frontier, 1754-1799 (Kent, Ohio, 1999).

William R. Nester, “Haughty Conquerors”: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763 (Westport, Conn.,  2000).

Michael Leroy Oberg, Dominion and Civility: English Imperialism and Native America, 1585-1685 (Ithaca, N.Y.. 1999).

John Oliphant. Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756-63 (Baton Rouge, La., 2001) .

Timothy J. Shannon, Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754 (Ithaca, N.Y., 2000)

J. Russell Snapp, John Stuart and the Struggle for Empire on the Southern Frontier (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1996).

Anthony F.C. Wallace, King of the Delawares: Teedyuscung (Philadelphia, 1949).

Stephen Saunders Webb, 1676: The End of American Independence(New York, 1984).

Richard White, The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 (New York, 1991).

Robert A. Williams, Jr., Linking Arms Together: American Indian Treaty Visions of Law and Peace, 1600-1800 (New York, 1997).

Articles:

Emerson W. Baker and John G. Reid, “Amerindian Power in the Early Modern Northeast: A Reappraisal,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 61 (2004), 77-106.

Gregory Evans Dowd, "'Insidious Friends': Gift Giving and the Cherokee-British Alliance in the Seven Years War," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 114-150.

Mary A. Druke, "Linking Arms: The Structure of Iroquois Intertribal Diplomacy," in Daniel K. Richter and James H. Merrell, eds., Beyond the Covenant Chain: The Iroquois and Their Neighbors in Indian North America, 1600-1800 (Syracuse, N.Y., 1987).

Kathleen DuVal, “‘A Good Relationship, & Commerce’: the Native Political Economy of the Arkansas River Valley,” Early American Studies, 1, no. 1 (2003), 61-89.

Lois M. Feister, "Linguistic Communication between the Dutch and Indians in New Netherland," Ethnohistory, XX (1973), 25-38.

William N. Fenton, "Structure, Continuity, and Change in the Process of Iroquois Treaty Making," in Francis Jennings, et al., eds.,Francis Jennings et al., eds., The History and Culture of Iroquois Diplomacy: An Interdisciplinary Guide to the Treaties of the Six Nations and Their League (Syracuse, N.Y., 1985).

Michael K. Foster, "Another Look at the Function of Wampum in Iroquois-White Councils," in Jennings et al., eds., History and Culture of Iroquois Diplomacy, 99-114.

Patricia Galloway, "'The Chief Who Is Your Father': Choctaw and French Views of the Diplomatic Relation," in Wood, Waselkov, and Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle, 254-255.

Richard L. Haan, "The Problem of Iroquois Neutrality: Suggestions for Revision," Ethnohistory, XXVII (1980), 317-330.

Richard L. Haan, "Covenant and Consensus: Iroquois and English, 1676-1760," in Daniel K. Richter and James H. Merrell, eds., Beyond the Covenant Chain: The Iroquois and Their Neighbors in Indian North America, 1600-1800(Syracuse, N.Y., 1987), 41-57.

Nancy L. Hagedorn, "'Faithful, Knowing, and Prudent': Andrew Montour as Interpreter and Cultural Broker, 1740-1772," in Margaret Connell Szasz, ed., Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker (Norman, Okla., 1994), 44-60.

Nancy L.Hagedorn, "'A Friend to Go Between Them': The Interpreter as Cultural Broker during Anglo-Iroquois Councils," Ethnohistory, XXXV (1988), 60-80.

William B. Hart, "Black 'Go-Betweens' and the Mutability of 'Race,' Status, and Identity on New York's Pre-Revolutionary Frontier," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 88-113.

Eric Hinderaker, "The 'Four Indian Kings' and the Imaginative Construction of the First British Empire," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LIII (1996), 487-526.

William A. Hunter, "Moses (Tunda) Tatamy, Delaware Indian Diplomat," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 258-272.

Francis Jennings, "The Constitutional Evolution of the Covenant Chain," American Philosophical Society, Proceedings, CXV (1971), 88-96.

Peter Marshall, "Colonial Protest and Imperial Retrenchment: Indian Policy, 1764-1768," Journal of American Studies, V (1971), 1-17.

Michael N. McConnell, "Pisquetomen and Tamaqua: Mediating Peace in the Ohio Country," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 273-294.

James H. Merrell, "'The Cast of His Countenance': Reading Andrew Montour," in Ronald Hoffman, Michel Sobel, and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Through a Glass Darkly: Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1997), 13-39.

James H. Merrell, "Shamokin, 'the very seat of the Prince of darkness,': Unsettling the Early American Frontier," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 16-59.

James H. Merrell, "Shickellamy, 'A Person of Consequence,'" in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 227-257.

Jane T. Merritt, "Metaphor, Meaning, and Misunderstanding: Language and Power on the Pennsylvania Frontier," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 60-87.

Jon Parmenter, “L’arbre De Paix: Eighteenth-Century Franco-Iroquois Relations,” French Colonial History, 4 (2003), 63-80.

Jon Parmenter, “Rethinking William Penn’s Treaty with the Indians: Benjamin West, Thomas Penn, and the Legacy of Newcomer Relations in Colonial Pennsylvania,” Proteus, 19 (2002), 38-44.

Joshua A. Piker,  “‘White & Clean’ & Contested: Creek Towns and Trading Paths in the Aftermath of the Seven Years’ War,” Ethnohistory 50 (2003) 315-347.

Daniel K. Richter, "Native Peoples of North America and the Eighteenth-Century British Empire," in Wm. Roger Louis, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire, vol. II: The Eighteenth Century, ed. P.J. Marshall (Oxford, 1998), 347-364.

Daniel K. Richter, "Cultural Brokers and Intercultural Politics: New York-Iroquois Relations, 1664-1701," Journal of American History, LXXV (1988), 40-67.

Alan Taylor, "Captain Hendrick Aupaumut: The Dilemmas of an Intercultural Broker," Ethnohistory, XLIII (1996), 431-457.

Anthony F. C. Wallace, "Origins of Iroquois Neutrality: The Grand Settlement of 1701," Pennsylvania History, XXIV (1957), 223-235.

Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe, "Conrad Weiser: Mystic Diplomat," Explorations in Early American Culture, IV (2000), 113-147.

Cynthia J. VanZandt, “Mapping and the European Search for Intercultural Alliances in the Colonial World,” Early American Studies, 1, no. 2 (2003) 72-99.

Richard White, "'Although I am dead, I am not entirely dead. I have left a second of myself': Constructing Self and Persons on the Middle Ground of Early America," in Ronald Hoffman, Michel Sobel, and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Through a Glass Darkly: Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1997), 404-418.

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Nativism and Cultural Revitalization in the Eighteenth Century

Books:

Gregory Evans Dowd, A Spirited Resistance: The North American Indian Struggle for Unity, 1745-1815 (Baltimore, Md., 1992).

R. David Edmunds, Tecumseh and the Quest for Indian Leadership(Boston, 1984).

Bil Gilbert, God Gave Us This Country: Tekamthi and the First American Civil War (New York, 1989).

Joel W. Martin, Sacred Revolt: The Muskogees' Struggle for a New World (Boston, 1991).

William R. Neste, Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763 (Westport Conn., 2000)

Howard H. Peckham, Pontiac and the Indian Uprising (Chicago, 1961).

John Sugden, Blue Jacket: Warrior of the Shawnees (Lincoln, Neb., 2000)

John Sugden, Tecumseh: A Life (New York, 1997).

John Sugden, Tecumseh's Last Stand (Norman, Oklahoma, 1985).
 

Anthony F. C. Wallace, The Death and Rebirth of the Seneca. (New York, 1969).

Articles:

Alfred A. Cave, "The Delaware Prophet Neolin: A Reappraisal," Ethnohistory, XLVI (1999), 265-290.

Alfred A. Cave, "The Failure of the Shawnee Prophet's Witch-Hunt," Ethnohistory, XLII (1995), 445-475.

Gregory E. Dowd, "The French King Wakes Up at Detroit: 'Pontiac's War' in Rumor and History," Ethnohistory, XXXIV (1990), 254-278.

Jay Miller, "The 1806 Purge among the Indiana Delaware: Sorcery, Gender, Boundaries, and Legitimacy,"Ethnohistory, XLI (1994), 245-266.

Nancy Shoemaker, "How Indians Got to Be Red," American Historical Review, CII (1997), 624-644.

Elisabeth Tooker, "On the Development of the Handsome Lake Religion," American Philosophical Society, Proceedings, CXXXIII (1989), 35-50.

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Native People and the New U.S. Republic

Books:

Carl Benn, The Iroquois in the War of 1812 (Toronto, 1998)

Colin G. Calloway, The American Revolution in Indian Country: Crisis and Diversity in Native American Communities(New York, 1995).

Colin G. Calloway, Crown and Calumet: British-Indian Relations, 1783-1815(Norman, Okla., 1987).

Fisher, Joseph R., Well-Executed Failure: The Sullivan Campaign against the Iroquois, July-September 1779 (Columbia S.C., 1997).

Barbara Graymont, The Iroquois in the American Revolution (Syracuse, New York, 1972).

Laurence M. Hauptman, Conspiracy of Interests: Iroquois Dispossession and the Rise of New York State (Syracuse, N.Y., 1999)

Laurence M. Hauptman, and L. Gordon McLester, III, eds., The Oneida Indian Journey: From New York to Wisconsin, 1784-1860 (Madison, Wisc., 1999).

Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1999).

Frederick Hoxie, Ronald Hoffman, and Peter Albert, eds., Native Americans and the Early Republic, (Charlottesville, Virginia, 1999), 125-161.

Isabel Thompson Kelsay, Joseph Brant, 1743-1807: Man of Two Worlds(Syracuse, New York, 1984).

Greg O’Brien, Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 1750–1830 (Lincoln, Neb., 2002).

John Sugden, Blue Jacket: Warrior of the Shawnees (Lincoln, Neb., 2000).

Wiley Sword, President Washington's Indian War: The Struggle for the Old Northwest, 1790-1795 (Norman, Oklahoma, 1985).

Anthony F. C. Wallace, Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans (Cambridge, Mass., 1999).

Articles:

Andrew R. L. Cayton, "'Noble Actors' upon 'the Theatre of Honour': Power and Civility in the Treaty of Greenville," in Cayton and Fredrika Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 235-269.

Ruth Wallis Herndon and Ella Wilcox Sekatau, "The Right to a Name: The Narragansett People and Rhode Island Officials in the Revolutionary Era," Ethnohistory, XLIV (1997), 433-462.

Francis Jennings, "The Indians' Revolution," in Alfred F. Young, ed., The American Revolution: Explorations in the History of American Radicalism (DeKalb, Ill., 1976), 319-348.

James H. Merrell, "Declarations of Independence: Indian-White Relations in the New Nation," in Jack P. Greene, ed., The American Revolution: Its Character and Limits (New York, 1987), 197-223.

Robert M. Owens, “Jeffersonian Benevolence on the Ground: the Indian Land Cession Treaties of William Henry Harrison,” Journal of the Early Republic, 22 (2002), 405-435.

Elizabeth A. Perkins, "Distinctions and Partitions amongst Us: Identity and Interaction in the Revolutionary Ohio Valley, in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 205-234.

Daniel K. Richter, "Onas, the Long Knife: Pennsylvanians and Indians, 1783-1794," in Frederick Hoxie, Ronald Hoffman, and Peter Albert, eds., Native Americans and the Early Republic, (Charlottesville, Virginia, 1999), 125-161.

William A. Starna, “‘The United States Will Protect You’: the Iroquois, New York, and the 1790 Nonintercourse Act,” New York History, 83 (2002), 4-33.

Alan Taylor, “The Divided Ground: Upper Canada, New York, and the Iroquois Six Nations, 1783-1815,” Journal of the Early Republic, 22 (2002), 55-75.

Karim M. Tiro, "A 'Civil' War? Rethinking Iroquois Participation in the American Revolution," Explorations in Early American Culture, IV (2000), 148-165.

Anthony Wonderley, “‘Good Peter's Narrative of Several Transactions Respecting Indian Lands’: An Oneida View of Dispossession, 1785-1788,” New York History,  84(2003), 236-273.

Anthony Wonderley, "An Oneida Community in 1780: Study of an Inventory of Iroquois Property Losses during the Revolutionary War," Northeast Anthropology, Number 56 (Fall 1998), 19-41

Readings on the "Iroquois Influence Thesis":

Robert L. Berner, “A Final Word on Johansen, Grinde, and the Iroquois Example,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 26 (2002), 123-127.

Donald Grinde, The Iroquois and the Founding of the American Nation (San Francisco, 1977).

Bruce E. Johansen, Forgotten Founders: Benjamin Franklin, the Iroquois, and the Rationale for the American Revolution (Ipswich, Mass., 1982).

Elisabeth Tooker, "The United States Constitution and the Iroquois League," Ethnohistory, XXXV (1988), 305-336.

Johansen, "Native American Societies and the Evolution of Democracy in America, 1600-1800," Ethnohistory, XXXVII (1990), 279-290.

Tooker, "Reply to Johansen," ibid., XXXVII (1990), 291-297.

Johansen and Grinde, "The Debate Regarding American Precedents for Democracy: A Recent Historiography," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, XIV, no. 1 (1990), 61-88.

Forum: The "Iroquois Influence Thesis--Con and Pro," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LIII (1996), 587-636.

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Reinventing Economies and Societies in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Books:

Michael Green, The Politics of Indian Removal: Creek Government and Society in Crisis (Lincoln, Neb., 1982).

William G. McLoughlin, Cherokee Renascence in the New Republic (Princeton, N.J., 1986).

Theda Perdue: Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society, 1540-1866(Knoxville, Tenn., 1979).

Claudio Saunt, A New Order of Things: Property, Power, and the Transformation of the Creek Indians, 1733-1816 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999)

J. Leitch Wright, Creeks and Seminoles: the Destruction and Regeneration of the Muscogulge People (Lincoln, Nebraska, 1986).

Thurman Wilkins, Cherokee Tragedy: the Ridge Family and the Decimation of a People, 2d ed. (Norman, Okla., 1986).

Articles

Stephen Aron, "Pigs and Hunters: 'Rights in the Woods' on the Trans-Appalachian Frontier," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830(Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 175-203.

Daniel R. Mandell, "Shifting Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity: Indian-Black Intermarriage in Southern New England, 1760-1880," Journal of American History, LXXXV (1998), 466-501.

Kim McQuaid, "William Apes, Pequot: An Indian Reformer in the Jackson Era," New England Quarterly, L (1977), 614-622.

Barry O'Connell, Introduction, in On Our Own Ground: The Complete Writings of William Apess, a Pequot (Amherst, Mass., 1992).

Karim M. Tiro, "Denominated 'SAVAGE': Methodism, Writing, and Identity in the Works of William Apess, A Pequot," American Quarterly, XLVIII (1996)

Mary Young, "The Cherokee Nation: Mirror of the Republic," American Quarterly, XXXIII (1981), 502-525.


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Gender, Kinship, and Social Transformation

Books:

Barbara A. Mann, Iroquoian Women: The Gantowisas (New York: Peter Lang, 2000)

Lucy Eldersveld Murphy, A Gathering of Rivers: Indians, Metis, and Mining in the Western Great Lakes, 1737-1832 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000)

Theda Perdue, Cherokee Women: Gender and Culture Change, 1700-1835 (Lincoln, Neb., 1998).

Susan Sleeper-Smith, Indian Women and French Men (Amherst, Mass., 2001)

Articles:

Thomas S. Abler, “Seneca Moieties and Hereditary Chieftainships: The Early-Nineteenth-Century Political Organization of an Iroquois Nation,” Ethnohistory 51 (2004) 459-488.

Emerson W. Baker, “Finding the Almouchiquois: Native American Families, Territories, and Land Sales in Southern Maine,” Ethnohistory 51 (2004) 73-100.

Juliana Barr, “A Diplomacy of Gender: Rituals of First Contact in the ‘Land of the Tejas,’” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 61 (2004), 393-434.

Rebecca B. Bateman, “Naming Patterns in Black Seminole Ethnogenesis,” Ethnohistory 49 (2002) 227-257.

Lois M. Feister and Bonni Pulis, "Molly Brant: Her Domestic and Political Roles in Eighteenth-Century New York," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 295-320.

Alison Duncan Hirsch, "'The Celebrated Mme. Montour': Interpretess Across Early American Frontiers," Explorations in Early American Culture, IV (2000), 81-112.

Daniel R. Mandell, “The Indian's Pedigree (1794): Indians, Folklore, and Race in Southern New England,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 61 (2004), 521-538.

Lucy Eldersveld Murphy, "To Live among Us: Accommodation, Gender, and Conflict in the Western Great Lakes Region, 1760-1832," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830(Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 270-303.

Nancy Shoemaker, "An Alliance between men: Gender Metaphors in Eighteenth-Century American Indian Diplomacy East of the Mississippi," Ethnohistory, XLVI (1999), 239-264.

Jennifer M. Spear, “Colonial Intimacies: Legislating Sex in French Louisiana,’ William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 60 (2003), 75-98.

Claudio Saunt, "'Domestick . . . Quiet being broke': Gender Conflict among Creek Indians in the Eighteenth Century," in Andrew R. L. Cayton and Fredrika J. Teute, eds., Contact Points: American Frontiers from the Mohawk Valley to the Mississippi, 1750-1830 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1998), 151-174.


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Regional Studies

NORTHEAST:

Books:


Russell Bourne, The Red King's Rebellion: Racial Politics in New England, 1675-1678 (New York, 1991).

Bruce J. Bourque, Steven L. Cox, and Ruth H. Whitehead, Twelve Thousand Years: American Indians in Maine (Lincoln, Neb., 2001).

Colin G. Calloway, ed., After King Philip's War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England (Hanover, N.H., 1997)

Colin G. Calloway, The Western Abenakis of Vermont, 1600-1800: War, Migration, and the Survival of an Indian People(Norman, Oklahoma, 1990).

Jack Campisi, The Mashpee Indians: Tribe on Trial (Syracuse, New York, 1991).

James D. Drake, King Philip's War: Civil War in New England, 1675-1676 (Amherst, Mass., 1999)

Patrick Frazier, The Mohicans of Stockbridge (Lincoln, Neb., 1992).

Ives Goddard and Kathleen J. Bragdon, Native Writings in Massachusett, 2 vols. (Philadelphia, 1988).

Robert S. Grumet, Historic Contact: Indian People and Colonists in Today's Northeastern United States in the Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries (Norman, Okla., 1995).

Douglas Edward Leach, Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philip's War (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1958).

Patrick M. Malone, The Skulking Way of War: Technology and Tactics among the New England Indians (Baltimore, 1991).

Daniel R. Mandell, Behind the Frontier: Indians in Eighteenth-Century Eastern Massachusetts(Lincoln, Neb., 1996).

Kenneth M. Morrison, The Embattled Northeast: The Elusive Ideal of Alliance in Abenaki-Euramerican Relations (Berkeley, California, 1984).

Jean M. O'Brien, Dispossession by Degrees: Indian Land and Identity in Natick, Massachusetts, 1650-1790 (Cambridge, 1997).

Patricia E. Rubertone, Grave Undertakings: An Archaeology of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians (Washington, D.C., 2001).

John A. Strong, The Montaukett Indians of Eastern Long Island (Syracuse, N.Y., 2001).

John Wood Sweet, Bodies Politic: Negotiating Race in the American North, 1730-1830 (Baltimore, 2003).

Alden T. Vaughan, ed., New England Encounters: Indians and Euroamericans, ca. 1600-1850: Essays Drawn from The New England Quarterly (Boston, 1999)

Frederick Matthew Wiseman, The Voice of the Dawn: An Autohistory of the Abenaki Nation (Hanover, N.H. 2001).

Articles:

Virginia DeJohn Anderson, "King Philip's Herds: Indians, Colonists, and the Problem of Livestock in Early New England," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., LI (1994).
 

James Drake, "Symbol of a Failed Strategy: The Sassamon Trial, Political Culture, and the Outbreak of King Philip's War," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, XIX, no. 2 (1995).

Matthew H. Edney and Susan Cimburek, “Telling the Traumatic Truth: William Hubbard's Narrative of King Philip's War and His ‘Map of New-England,’” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 61 (2004), 317-348.

David L. Ghere, "The 'Disappearance' of the Abenaki in Western Maine," American Indian Quarterly, XVII (1993).

David L. Ghere and Alvin H. Morrison, “Searchiing for Justice on the Maine Frontier: Legal Concepts, Treaties, and the 1749 Wiscasset Incident,” American Indian Quarterly 25 (2001), 378-399.

Laurence M. Hauptman, "Refugee Havens: The Iroquois Villages of the Eighteenth Century," in Christopher Vecsey and Robert W. Venables, eds., American Indian Environments: Ecological Issues in Native American History (Syracuse, N.Y., 1980), 128-139.

Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney, "Revisiting The Redeemed Captive: New Perspectives on the 1704 Attack on Deerfield," William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, LII (1995), 3-46.

Eric S. Johnson,"Released from Thraldom by the Stroke of War: Coercion and Warfare in Native Politics of Seventeenth-Century Southern New England," Northeast Anthropology, No. 55 (Spring 1998), 1-13

Lyle Koehler, "Red-White Power Relations and Justice in the Courts of Seventeenth-Century New England," American Indian Culture and Research Journal, III (1979), 1-32.

Jill Lepore, "Dead Men Tell No Tales: John Sassamon and the Fatal Consequences of Literacy," American Quarterly, XLVI (1994), 479-512.

Elizabeth A. Little, "Daniel Spotso: A Sachem at Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, circa 1691-1741," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 193-207.

Daniel Mandell, "'To Live More Like My Christian English Neighbors," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XLVIII (1991), 552-579.

Jean M. O'Brien, "'Divorced' from the Land: Resistance and Survival of Indian Women in Eighteenth-Century New England," in Colin G. Calloway, ed., After King Philip's War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England (Hanover, N.H., 1997), 144-161.

Ann Marie Plane, "Putting a Face on Colonization: Factionalism and Gender Politics in the Life History of Awashunkes, the Squaw Sachem' of Saconet," in Robert S. Grumet, ed., Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816 (Amherst, Mass., 1996), 140-165.

Jenny Hale Pulsipher, “‘Subjects . . . unto the Same King’: New England Indians and the Use of Royal Political Power,” Massachusetts Historical Review, 5 (2003), 29-57.

James P. Ronda, "Red and White at the Bench: Indians and the Law in Plymouth Colony, 1620-1691," Essex Institute Historical Collections, CX (1974), 200-215.

Neal Salisbury, "Indians and Colonists in Southern New England after the Pequot War: An Uneasy Balance," in Laurence M. Hauptman and James D. Wherry, eds., The Pequots in Southern New England: The Fall and Rise of an America Indian Nation (Norman, Okla., 1990).

Neal Salisbury, "Toward the Covenant Chain: Iroquois and Southern New England Algonquians, 1637-1684," in Daniel K. Richter and James H. Merrell, eds., Beyond the Covenant Chain: The Iroquois and Their Neighbors in Indian North America, 1600-1800 (Syracuse, N.Y., 1987), 61-74.

David Silverman, "Deposing the Sachem to Defend the Sachemship: Land Sales and Native Political Structure on Martha's Vineyard, 1680-1740," Explorations in Early American Culture, V (2001), 8-44.

David J. Silverman, “‘We chuse to be bounded’: Native American Animal Husbandry in Colonial New England,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 60 (2003), 511-548.

James Warren Springer, "American Indians and the Law of Real Property in Colonial New England, American Journal of Legal History, XXX (1986), 25-58.

Roumiana Velikova, “‘Philip, King of the Pequots’: the History of an Error,” Early American Literature, 37 (2002), 311-335.

Daniel Vickers, "The First Whalemen of Nantucket," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XL (1983), 560-583.

Dennis P. Walsh, “King Philip (Metacom) Redux: Massasoit's Son or Grandson?” New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 157 (2003), 116-123.

MID-ATLANTIC:

Books:

Richard Aquila, The Iroquois Restoration: Iroquois Diplomacy on the Colonial Frontier, 1701-1754 (Detroit, Mich., 1983).

José António Brandão, "Your Fyre Shall Burn No More:" Iroquois Policy toward New France and Its Native Allies to 1701(Lincoln, Neb., 1997).

William N. Fenton, The Great Law and the Longhouse: A Political History of the Iroquois Confederacy (Norman, Okla., 1998).

Michael K. Foster, et al., eds., Extending the Rafters: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Iroquoian Studies (Albany, N.Y., 1984).

Herbert C. Kraft, The Lenape: Archaeology, History, and Ethnography(Newark, N.J., 1986).

William A. Pencak and Daniel K. Richter, eds., Friends and Enemies in Penn’s Woods: Indians, Colonists, and the Racial Construction of Pennsylvania (University Park, Pa., 2004).

Daniel K. Richter, The Ordeal of the Longhouse: The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1992).

John A. Strong, The Algonquian Peoples of Long Island from Earliest Times to 1700 (Interlaken, N.Y., 1997).

Allen W. Trelease, Indian Affairs in Colonial New York: The Seventeenth Century (Ithaca, N.Y., 1960).

Articles:

Francis Jennings, "Glory, Death, and Transfiguration: The Susquehannock Indians in the Seventeenth Century," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, CXII (1968), 15-53.

Craig S. Keener, "An Ethnohistorical Analysis of Iroquois Assault Tactics Used against Fortified Settlements of the Northeast in the Seventeenth Century, Ethnohistory XLVI (1999), 777-807

James H. Merrell, "Cultural Continuity among the Piscataway Indians of Colonial Maryland," ibid., XXXVI (1979), 548-570.

Peter Pagoulatos, “Late Woodland Settlement Patterns of New Jersey,” North American Archaeologist, 22 (2001), 201-230.

William A. Starna, and Ralph Watkins, "Northern Iroquoian Slavery," Ethnohistory, XXXVIII (1991), 34-57.

William A. Starna and José António Brandão, “From the Mohawk-Mahican War to the Beaver Wars: Questioning the Pattern,” Ethnohistory 51 (2004) 725-750.

GREAT LAKES AND OHIO COUNTRY:

Books:

David R. M. Beck, Siege and Survival: History of the Menominee Indians, 1634-1856 (Lincoln, Neb., 2002).

R. David Edmunds and Joseph L. Peyser, The Fox Wars: The Mesquakie Challenge to New France (Norman, Okla., 1993).

Cornelius. J. Jaenen, Friend and Foe: Aspects of French-Amerindian Cultural Contact in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (New York, 1976).

Conrad E. Heidenreich, Huronia: A History and Geography of the Huron Indians, 1600-1650.(Toronto, Ont., 1971).

Michael N. McConnell, A Country Between: The Upper Ohio Valley and Its Peoples, 1724-1774(Lincoln, Nebraska, 1992).

Elisabeth Tooker, An Ethnography of the Huron Indians, 1615-1649, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 190 (Washington, D.C., 1964).

Bruce G. Trigger, The Children of Aataentsic: A History of the Huron People to 1660 (Montreal, Que., 1976).

Bruce G. Trigger, Natives and Newcomers: Canada's "Heroic Age" Reconsidered (Kingston, Ont., 1985).

Articles:

Jan Grabowski, "French Criminal Justice and Indians in Montreal, 1670-1760," Ethnohistory, XLIII (1996), 405-429.

Craig S. Keener, “An Ethnohistorical Analysis of Iroquois Assault Tactics Used against Fortified Settlements of the Northeast in the Seventeenth Century,” Ethnohistory 46 (1999) 777-807.

Michael McConnell, "Peoples 'In Between': The Iroquois and the Ohio Indians, 1720-1768, in Daniel K. Richter and James H. Merrell, eds., Beyond the Covenant Chain: The Iroquois and Their Neighbors in Indian North America, 1600-1800 (Syracuse, N.Y., 1987), 61-74.

Jacqueline Peterson, "Many Roads to Red River: Métis Genesis in the Great Lakes Region, 1680-1815," in Peterson and Jennifer S. H. Brown, ed., The New Peoples: Being and Becoming Métis in North America(Lincoln, Neb., 1985), 185-193.

SOUTHEAST:

Books:

Rolena Adorno and Patrick Charles Pautz, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: His Account, His Life and the Expedition of Pánfilo de Narváez, 3 vols. (Lincoln, Neb., 1999)

James Axtell, The Indians' New South: Cultural Change in the Colonial Southeast (Baton Rouge, La., 1997)

James Taylor Carson, Searching for the Bright Path: The Mississippi Choctaws from Prehistory to Removal (Lincoln, Neb., 1999)

Robbie Ethridge and Charles Hudson, eds., The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540–1760  (Jackson, Miss., 2002)

John H. Hann, and Bonnie G. McEwan, The Apalachee Indians and Mission San Luis (Gainesville, Fla., 1998).

Steven C. Hahn, The Invention of the Creek Nation, 1670-1763 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004).

Tom Hatley, The Dividing Paths: Cherokees and South Carolinians through the Era of Revolution (New York, 1993).

Paul E. Hoffman, Florida’s Frontiers (Bloomington, Ind., 2002).

Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians (Knoxville, Tenn., 1976)

James H. Merrell, The Indians' New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact through the Era of Removal (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1989).

Jerald T. Milanich, Florida’s Indians from Ancient Times to the Present (Gainesville, Fla., 1998).

Theda Perdue, “Mixed Blood” Indians: Racial Construction in the Early South (Athens, Ga., 2003).

Joshua Piker, Okfuskee: A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America (Cambridge, Mass., 2004).

Josú Rabasa, Writing Violence on the Northern Frontier: The Historiography of Sixteenth-Century New Mexico and Florida and the Legacy of Conquest (Durham, N.C., 2000)

John Phillip Reid, A Better Kind of Hatchet: Law, Trade, and Diplomacy in the Cherokee Nation during the Early Years of European Contact (University Park, Pa., 1976).

Helen C. Rountree, Pocahontas's People: The Powhatan Indians of Virginia through Four Centuries (Norman, Okla., 1990).

Helen C. Rountree and Thomas E. Davidson, Eastern Shore Indians of Virginia and Maryland(Charolottesville, Va., 1997).

Daniel H. Usner, Jr., American Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley: Social and Economic Histories. By Indians of the Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1998).

Daniel H. Usner, Jr., Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in a Frontier Exchange Economy: The Lower Mississippi Valley before 1783 (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1992).

Brent Richards Weisman, Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians (Gainesville, Fla., 1999). John

Patricia Riles Wickmam, The Tree That Bends: Discourse, Power, and the Survival of the Maskókî People (Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1999)

John E. Worth, The Timucuan Chiefdoms of Spanish Florida, vol. I: Assimilation; vol. 2:Resistance and Destruction (Tallahassee, Fla., 1998).

J. Leitch Wright, The Only Land They Knew: The Tragic Story of the American Indians in the Old South (New York, 1981).

Articles:

Amy Turner Bushnell, "Ruling 'the Republic of Indians' in Seventeenth-Century Florida," in Wood, Waselkov, and Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle, 134-150.

Heriberto Dixon, “A Saponi by Any Other Name Is Still a Siouan,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 26 (2002), 65-83.

Thomas Hatley, "The Three Lives of Keowee: Loss and Recovery in Eighteenth-Century Cherokee Villages," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast (Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 223-248.

Izumi Ishii, “Alcohol and Politics in the Cherokee Nation before Removal,” Ethnohistory 50 (2003) 671-695.

Jay K. Johnson, Jenny D. Yearous, and Nancy Ross-Stallings, "Ethnohistory, Archaeology, and Chickasaw Burial Mode during the Eighteenth Century,"Ethnohistory, XLI (1994), 431-446.

Vernon James Knight, Jr., "The Formation of the Creeks," in Charles Hudson and Carmen Chaves Tesser, eds., The Forgotten Centuries: Indians and Europeans in the American South, 1521-1704 (Athens, Georgia, 1994), 373-92.

James H. Merrell, "The Indians' New World: The Catawba Experience," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XLI (1984).

Theda Perdue, “Race and Culture: Writing the Ethnohistory of the Early South,” Ethnohistory 51 (2004) 701-723.

Gordon Sayre, “Plotting the Natchez Massacre: Le Page du Pratz, Dumont De Montigny, Chateaubriand,” Early American Literature, 37 (2002), 381-413.

Marvin T. Smith, "Aboriginal Population Movements in the Early Historic Period Interior Southeast," in Peter H. Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast(Lincoln, Neb., 1991), 21-34.

Peter H. Wood, "The Changing Population of the Colonial South: An Overview by Race and Region, 1685-1790," in Wood, Gregory A. Waselkov, and M. Thomas Hatley, eds., Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast(Lincoln, Neb., 1989), 52-53



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