HIST001 - MAKING OF A MODERN WORLD: 13 INNOVATIONS THAT CHANGED HUMAN HISTORY

Description: 
From pottery to sutras, steam engines to i-phones, milestones in human history have often stood upon major material, economic, social, and cultural innovations. This course will examine the development of the modern world through the prism of thirteen groundbreaking innovations. Each is noteworthy for its global repercussions and symbolizes a major transformation in the human experience: domestication of horses facilitated long-distance trade and warfare in the ancient world; a global market for tea sparked revolution in the eighteenth century (remember the Boston Tea Party!), the production line embodied a new global corporatist culture in the 1930s, and double-digit GDP growth in 1960s, 70s Asia forecast a shift in the global center of gravity toward Asia. This course is a gateway to the discipline of History and to the Department of History at Penn. As a Sector II class (History and Tradition), it highlights change and continuity in human action, belief, and thought. But it does so over a broad geographic and chronological range in a manner intended to provide three things: 1) a useful overview of major developments in the making of the modern world (empire, war, revolution, industrialization); 2) a strong appreciation for the interconnectedness of human action, belief, and thought across seven continents and five oceans; and 3) an introduction to some of the notable personalities in the Department of History (we will have several guest speakers from the Department). Whether you’re a seasoned History major or complete neophyte, the class offers a glimpse of the power of History and of the broad scope of historical coverage available in our department.
Instructors: 
DICKINSON, FREDERICK
Day and Time: 
MW 1200PM-0100PM
Room: 
ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
    • Major Concentrations: World