HIST106 - EPIDEMIC DISEASE IN MODERN HISTORY

Description: 
In this seminar, we look at how human societies have grappled with epidemic disease across the modern world. From cholera, to bubonic plague, to yellow fever, SARS, ebola, and flu, we’ll explore how outbreaks disrupt and devastate communities but also how they can be linked to state growth, medical reform, and cultural change. By looking at specific societies around the world at moments of acute distress, we’ll be able to ask questions about the role of government, about fault lines of class and race, and about how human beings have grappled with fear and systemic collapse at different moments in time and space. Yet we will also examine global trends and consider what the study of past epidemics can tell us about the world we live in today. Sources we will consider include medical treatises, diaries, novels, films, and cartoons. Hypochondriacs and germophobes are welcome. We’ll study epidemics from a very safe distance and (hopefully) without first-hand experience!
Instructors: 
CHASE-LEVENSON, ALEXANDER
Day and Time: 
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 217

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    • Major Concentrations: World