HIST151 - RACE, SPACE AND PLACE IN AMERICAN HISTORY

Description: 
This course provides with a historical introduction to America's racial and ethnic groupings by examining the social, spatial and historical forces that have defined these groups. Weekly lectures and readings trace American racial formations, identities and experiences from the age of Columbus to the present day. Following the work of historians and geographers who emphasize the importance of space and place in constructions of racial and ethnic identity, most of the class readings chart the evolution of such identities within specific regions or communities. Early readings illuminate the origins of categories such as "white," black, "Native American" and "Asian" by exploring the colonial encounters in which these identities first took shape; while later readings trace how these identities have been maintained and/or changed over time.
Instructors: 
BAY, MIA
Day and Time: 
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Room: 

MEYERSON HALL B4

Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US
    • Major Concentrations: American
    • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US