HIST156 - HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS

Description: 
With annual growth rates between 5-10 percent for much of the last fifteen years, it may seem that the turn of the millennium has marked a fundamental shift in the state of Indian business. Yet at the same time stories continue to abound about the dark side of India's recent "shining" where matters such as distributional justice and the fate of social strata like the subaltern poor and agrarian are concerned. Moreover, broader intra-regional forces continue to affect the state of business in a way that constantly reminds us that traditionally lacked any absolutely clear cut geographical correlate. How then should we think of the history of Indian business? In what ways is such a history different from or the same as the economic history of the South Asian subcontinent, its borderlands, and the broader Indian Ocean world it was long connected to? Can isolating something to be thought of as business in the past illuminate the structure or challenges of what we all so intuitively think of as the financial, commercial, and industrial aspects of business in the present? In this course we will consider these and other questions by tracing the interactions between the three-fold forces of entrepreneurialism, labor, and kinship/sovereignty--considered as the underlying conditions of business activity's possibility--from ancient to modern times in South Asia.
Instructors: 
CHAUDHRY, FAISAL
Day and Time: 
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Room: 
WILLIAMS HALL 215
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
  • SAST166401