HIST203 - REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA 1750-1800: POLITICS, WAR AND SOCIETY

Description: 
In this course, we will study the American Revolution with the goal of appreciating how its many dimensions—political, military, social, cultural, economic—contributed to how people of all types experienced the era. We will begin by exploring colonial America and the British Empire at mid-century. Increasing tensions between Britain and the colonies ultimately resulted in the outbreak of armed conflict in 1775. As we consider the many consequences of Americans’ decision to declare Independence, we will pay significant attention to the course of the war that ultimately secured the status of the United States “among the powers of the earth.” Yet Americans continued to face numerous challenges. By 1787, an influential group of Americans favored the creation of a new constitutional regime, one that the populace at large debated with passion and intelligence. By the turn of the nineteenth century, the United States possessed a federal system of government grounded on republican principles, and stood to exercise a profound influence on the future of North America. In the course of this half century, though, what had changed and what had stayed the same? Class meetings will consist of discussions based on a wide variety of revealing primary texts and insightful secondary scholarship. Students will also research and write a significant paper on any topic related to Revolutionary America.
Instructors: 
HRDLICKA, JAMES
Day and Time: 
W 0330PM-0630PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 217

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Syllabus: 
    Registration Notes: 
    MAJORS ONLY