HIST204 - RACE, GENDER & THE MAKING OF GLOBAL MODERN AMERICA

Description: 
This course explores the global development of modern America, with a particular emphasis on empire, race and gender. It explores the way in which the US has been fundamentally created through its engagement with other nations, as well as broader ideas of “the global.” Much of this class will also be about the intellectual project of learning to think globally, as well as through the lens of race, gender and class. Many of the works we read will cover similar topics and time periods in slightly or even vastly different ways. They may discuss different populations existing at the same time, similar populations existing at different times, or have different interpretations or perspectives on the same group of people at the same time. Part of our job in class will be to reconcile the meaning of these divergent narratives and ask what these different lenses tell us about the past. Although it moves roughly chronologically through the late nineteenth and twentieth century, this is not a US history survey course. Rather, this class is aimed and understanding the way in which the modern, global, United States was made through ideas of race, class, gender and empire. For instance, we will discuss not only the way in which racial battles unfolded domestically after World War II, but also how this project was deeply embedded in the global discourse of race. A background in twentieth century history is helpful, but not necessary.
Instructors: 
LAKHANI, ZAIN
Day and Time: 

CANCELED

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    MAJORS ONLY
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