HIST230 - HISTORY, MEMORY, AND NOSTALGIA IN MODERN EUROPE

Description: 
Karl Marx compared history to a nightmare weighing on the brains of the living, but it can also be a refuge, a source of inspiration, and a constant companion. In this course, we will consider our own relationship to the past as we navigate the boundaries and intersections of history, memory, and nostalgia. Reading will consist of plays, novels, music, film, television, and painting. From the trauma of the Holocaust to the conflicted memory of empire, from preservation to imagination, we will consider a wide array of methods through which Europeans have engaged their past over the last two hundred and fifty years. How does the academic study of the past relate to individual and collective memories of it? If "living in the past" seems often seems counterproductive, in what ways can nostalgia be helpful? We will consider these questions as we study topics such as the birth of heritage movements in the nineteenth century, the formation of national museums, representations of war and violence, legacies of imperialism, and the history of memory after the cataclysms of the twentieth century.
Instructors: 
CHASE-LEVENSON, ALEXANDER
Day and Time: 
W 0200PM-0500PM
Room: 

VAN PELT LIBRARY 402

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: