HIST231 - JAPANESE-AMERICAN INTERNMENT

Description: 
This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
Instructors: 
AZUMA, EIICHIRO
Day and Time: 
T 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 
COLLEGE HALL 217
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US