HIST233 - People and Power in Modern Mexico

Description: 
This seminar introduces the history of revolution and authoritarianism in Mexico from c.1880 - c.2000. It applies multidisciplinary approaches to primary sources ranging from cartoons to declassified intelligence to consider the relationships between people and power, investigating the three central questions of modern Mexican history: Why was there a major social revolution? How did that popular revolution mutate into a successful authoritarian state? And how did Mexicans with profound experience of mass mobilization coexist with that authoritarianism, and with the skewed economy it oversaw? In debating these questions the course aims not just to trace the course of modern Mexican social, cultural and political history, but also to think about a more general problem: Why people rebel, and why they do not rebel. This course fulfills the seminar and Latin America requirements for the History Major.
Instructors: 
LOMBERA, JUAN
Day and Time: 
MW 0630PM-0800PM
Room: 
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • SOCI431601
Registration Notes: 
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS
This is an LPS course. Registration may be limited to LPS students.