HIST370 - N.AFRICA:HIST,CULTR,SOC

Description: 
This interdisciplinary seminar examines the colonial and postcolonial experiences of North Africa in the context of the region’s close connections to Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. Readings will cover Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya as well as their relationships to the history of French, Italian and Spanish colonialism. While the period of sustained European imperial control over North Africa began as early as 1830 in Algeria and as late as 1911-12 in Libya and Morocco, decolonization was almost complete in the region by the early 1960s. Throughout the semester, we will test the thesis that this “colonial moment” had far-reaching implications not only for postcolonial North African societies, but also for the European countries that imposed colonial rule. We will also explore the interconnectedness of economic, political, and cultural phenomena in North African history, e.g., the implications of labor migration for musical culture, and the interplay of religion and language in the construction of national identities. Finally, we will consider the ways in which portrayals of history and culture have been politically charged and hotly contested in both colonial and postcolonial contexts. Note: This seminar is intended for students who already have a background in modern Middle Eastern or African history.
Instructors: 
SHARKEY, HEATHER
Day and Time: 
T 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 

WILLIAMS HALL 843

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • AFST332401
  • AFST533401
  • NELC332401
  • NELC632401