HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

Description: 
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions.
Instructors: 
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Day and Time: 
W 0530PM-0830PM
Room: 

VAN PELT LIBRARY 113

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • SOCI420401
  • URBS420401
Registration Notes: 
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR