HIST441 - NORTH AMER COLONIAL HIST

Description: 
This course explores North American history from the earliest contacts between Europeans and Native Americans in the fifteenth century to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Undergraduate and graduate students will attend the same lectures but participate in separate discussion sections, with separate reading lists and course requirements. We begin with two assumptions. First, we will assume that, because the setting for the story is the place that was eastern North America, our cast of characters should include the many different men and women who struggled to control that place—Europeans from several nations, Native Americans from various cultures, Africans uprooted from diverse societies. Second, we will assume that the story of the interactions among these many characters must be told on its own terms, rather than as a mere prelude to “real” American history. None of the people who contended for control of the continent—not even those of English descent—dreamed for a moment that their purpose was to create an independent nation called the United States of America. We will try, then, to read the past forward, rather than backward, in order to appreciate something about the diverse lives of colonial North Americans.
Instructors: 
RICHTER, DANIEL
Day and Time: 
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 318

Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
    Syllabus: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US