HIST447 - HISTORIES OF THE INFORMATION ECONOMY

Description: 
Information may be accumulated or lost; it can be safeguarded or debased; it can confer power or undermine it. Consistently, this course provides a perspective on information as historical actor. Beyond neoliberal narratives of the progress of the information economy driven by technological factors, the course underscores the importance of value (social, political, economic) which is at the heart of information gathering and information production. The course approaches major works, dealing with the historical importance of information (Foucault, Innis, Habermas) and simultaneously discusses the rise and fall of institutions to store and circulate information. This is achieved through an empirical, narrative approach, via the study of historical processes such as imperialism, state building, propaganda, the police archives and the politics of memory.
Instructors: 
FLANDREAU, MARC
Day and Time: 
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Room: 

WILLIAMS HALL 421

Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: