HIST531 - TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HIST: HISTORY OF HUMAN VOICE

Description: 
The overall goal of this course is to show how notions of 'humanity' and its distinction from the 'sub- human' have changed throughout the modern period, using interpretations of the voice and its articulations of humanity as a yard-stick. From the late eighteenth century onward, as scientists discovered more about the workings of the throat, the voice was increasingly seen as a physical -- rather than as a spiritual -- phenomenon. Entrenched in specific bodies, voices were therefore believed to 'say' something about their owners: 'savages' were supposedly free of stammering, women's speech betrayed their inherent softness, and the deaf were considered to be incapable of expressing abstract thought through their sign language. ***This course is PRIMARY to the Dutch Department. Please contact their department or the instructor for more information.***
Day and Time: 
R 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • COML532401
  • DTCH530401
  • GRMN555401