Inscription and Erasure: Literature and Written Culture from the Eleventh to the Eighteenth Century

2008
University of Pennsylvania Press

The fear of oblivion obsessed medieval and early modern Europe. Stone, wood, cloth, parchment, and paper all provided media onto which writing was inscribed as a way to ward off loss. And the task was not easy in a world in which writing could be destroyed, manuscripts lost, or books menaced with destruction.

Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia

1996
The University of North Carolina Press

Kathleen Brown examines the origins of racism and slavery in British North America from the perspective of gender. Both a basic social relationship and a model for other social hierarchies, gender helped determine the construction of racial categories and the institution of slavery in Virginia. But the rise of racial slavery also transformed gender relations, including ideals of masculinity.

Foul Bodies: Cleanliness in Early America (Society and the Sexes in the Modern World)

2011
Yale University Press

A nation’s standards of private cleanliness reveal much about its ideals of civilization, fears of disease, and expectations for public life, says Kathleen Brown in this unusual cultural history. Starting with the shake-up of European practices that coincided with Atlantic expansion, she traces attitudes toward “dirt” through the mid-nineteenth century, demonstrating that cleanliness—and the lack of it—had moral, religious, and often sexual implications.

Marx, the Young Hegelians, and the Origins of Radical Social Theory: Dethroning the Self (Modern European Philosophy)

2001
Cambridge University Press

This is the first major study of Marx and the Young Hegelians in twenty years. The book offers a new interpretation of Marx's early development, the political dimension of Young Hegelianism, and that movement's relationship to political and intellectual currents in early nineteenth-century Germany.

European Romanticism: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Series in History & Culture)

2007
Bedford/St. Martin's

As the nineteenth century began, western Europe was swept by one of the great cultural shifts of the modern era: the Romantic movement. Warren Breckman's volume examines the history of Romanticism as a political, literary, and philosophical movement that exerted a significant influence on modern attitudes toward art, science, and religion.

The Modernist Imagination: Intellectual History and Critical Theory

2011
Berghahn Books

Some of the most exciting and innovative work in the humanities currently takes place at the intersection of intellectual history and critical theory. Just as critical theorists are becoming more aware of the historicity of theory, contemporary practitioners of modern intellectual history are recognizing their potential contributions to theoretical discourse. No one has done more than Martin Jay to realize the possibilities for mutual enrichment between intellectual history and critical theory.

Why ERA Failed: Politics, Women's Rights, and the Amending Process of the Constitution (Everywoman: Studies in History, Literature, & Culture)

1988
Indiana University Press

Why ERA Failed looks at the systemic problems of politics and the amending process. The author, Mary Frances Berry, considers the behavior of the two sides from the perspective of a historian and lawyer. She describes the history of the amending process, from the Constitutional Convention to the present day, and its application to the struggles for amendments concerned with the status of blacks after the Civil War, income tax, prohibition, child labor, and woman suffrage.

Black Resistance/White Law: A History of Constitutional Racism in America

1995
Penguin Books

How the government has used the Constitution to deny black Americans their legal rights

From the arrival of the first twenty slaves in Jamestown to the Howard Beach Incident of 1986, Yusef Hawkins, and Rodney King, federal law enforcement has pleaded lack

Long Memory: The Black Experience in America

1982
Oxford University Press, USA

This powerful, provocative survey is organized around the key issues of Afro-American history: Africa and slavery, family, religion, sex and racism, politics, economics, education, criminal justice, discrimination and protest movements, and black nationalism.

The Pig Farmer's Daughter and Other Tales of American Justice: Episodes of Racism and Sexism in the Courts from 1865 to the Present

2000
Vintage

From the head of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission comes a landmark study of the ways in which prejudice has shaped American justice from the Civil War era to the present.

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