Octavia M. Carr

Administrative Coordinator
Education: 

B.A., Criminal Justice, Temple University (2012) 

M.S.Ed. Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania (Anticipated May 2019) 

208 College Hall
215-898-8453 (p)
215-573-2089 (f)

Email: octaviac@sas.upenn.edu

 

 

Thomas Max Safley

Early modern Europe, economy, society and religion
Professor of History
Faculty Fellow, Harrison College House
College Hall 309A
Office Hours: 
By appt.
Teaching Schedule: 
On leave
tsafley@history.upenn.edu
215 898.2186

Thomas Max Safley is Professor of Early Modern European History. A specialist in the economic and social history of early modern Europe, roughly 1450-1750, he has published extensively on the histories of marriage and the family, poverty and charity and labor and business.

Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 001 Europe In A Wider World
  • HIST 002 Europe In A Wider World
  • HIST 040 Early Modern Europe, 1450 - 1750
  • HIST 123 Economic History of Europe
  • HIST 202 Economic Thought to Smith
  • HIST 211 Banks & Bankers
  • HIST 309 Europe in the Age of the Reformation
  • HIST 310 Europe in the Age of the Baroque

Sample History Event

Fri, 05/24/2013 - 7:00pm
Franklin Field

Sample event description.

A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan

2003
University of California

This incisive study adds a new dimension to discussions of Egypt's nationalist response to the phenomenon of colonialism as well as to discussions of colonialism and nationalism in general. Eve M. Troutt Powell challenges many accepted tenets of the binary relationship between European empires and non-European colonies by examining the triangle of colonialism marked by Great Britain, Egypt, and the Sudan.

Tell This in My Memory: Stories of Enslavement from Egypt, Sudan, and the Ottoman Empire

2012
Stanford University Press

In the late nineteenth century, an active slave trade sustained social and economic networks across the Ottoman Empire and throughout Egypt, Sudan, the Caucasus, and Western Europe. Unlike the Atlantic trade, slavery in this region crossed and mixed racial and ethnic lines. Fair-skinned Circassian men and women were as vulnerable to enslavement in the Nile Valley as were teenagers from Sudan or Ethiopia.

Eve M. Troutt Powell

Middle Eastern history
Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of History
SAS Associate Dean for Graduate Studies
College Hall 213
troutt@sas.upenn.edu
215 898.3518

Eve M. Troutt Powell teaches the history of the modern Middle East and the history of slavery in the Nile Valley and the Ottoman Empire. As a cultural historian, she emphasizes the exploration of literature and film in her courses. She is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan (University of California, 2003) and the co-editor, with John Hunwick, of The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam (Princeton Series on the Middle East, Markus Wiener Press, 2002).

Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 081 History of the Middle East since 1800
  • HIST 106 Religion, Revolution and Nationalism in the Modern Middle East
  • HIST 189 Modern Egypt
  • HIST 216 Filming the Middle East
  • HIST 371 Africa and the Mid-East

Adam Goodman interviewed for Mexican TV

Sat, 09/21/2013

Adam Goodman, was recently interviewed on Mexican TV about issues of migration and deportation, whether the "American dream" is still alive for Mexicans, and the competing narratives of Mexico as an economic success story vs. the experience of the vast majority struggling to get by.

Peter Holquist named 2013 fellow at New York Public Library

Fri, 04/05/2013

Peter Holquist has been named a 2013 fellow of New York Public Library's 

Graduate Social Science and Policy Forum

Fri, 09/06/2013

Yakov FeyginAnthony Pratcher, and Salar Mohandesi founded the Graduate Social Science and Policy Forum (affiliated with Penn Social Science and Policy Forum).

Kenneth Ginsburg named a Dean's Scholar

Wed, 05/01/2013

Undergraduate history major, Kenneth Ginsburg, was named a Dean's Scholar, the highest award for student academic achievement at Penn. 

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