Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Major Concentrations Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled
HIST 012-401 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Brian J Spooner
Mauro Federico Guillen
M 02:00 PM-04:00 PM Topics vary each semester. ANTH012401, SOCI012401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
World
HIST 024-401 Intro To Anc Near East Emily L Hammer TR 03:00 PM-04:00 PM See primary department (NELC) for a complete course description. ANCH025401, NELC101401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
World Africa/Middle East, pre-1800
HIST 026-401 Ancient Greece Jeremy James Mcinerney MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM See primary department (ANCH) for a complete course description. ANCH026401, CLST026401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
European Europe, pre-1800
HIST 030-001 Emergence of Mod Europe Antonio Feros TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This course traces the formation of European society, politics and culture from its earliest days through the era of the Reformation, ca. 1000-1600 CE. Major themes will include: politics and power; law and the state; economics and trade; religion; learning and the rise of universities; social organization; everyday life. The reading and analysis of primary sources from each era will be important in understanding Europe's key features and development. History & Tradition Sector European Europe, pre-1800
HIST 036-401 Medicine in History Meghan L Crnic TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM HSOC002401, STSC002401 History & Tradition Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HIST 046-401 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama Siarhei Biareishyk TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? this course adopts a unique approach to questions cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organize around a medium-length film, text, or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analyical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history. Prerequisite: All readings and lectures in English. REES187401 Humanities & Social Science Sector European, Intellectual Europe
HIST 070-401 Colonial Latin America Marcia Susan Norton MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships. LALS070401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
World Latin America/Caribbean, pre-1800
HIST 073-401 Colonial Pasts & Indigenous Futures: A History of Belize & Central America Richard M Leventhal CANCELED The small country of Belize (formerly British Honduras) represents the past history and ongoing story of Central America and the region. Belize has a colonial past and present with strong ties to the UK and emerging connections to the US. At the same time, there is a growing post-colonial debate within the country about the role of indigenous Maya people in the past, present and future of the country. This course will be the first of two courses which will lead to active work in Belize during the summer of 2021 with the development and creation of a Community Museum within the Maya village of Indian Creek in southern Belize. This course will be taught by Richard M. Leventhal who has worked in Belize for the past 20 years. Leventhal will be joined by 3 Maya activists from Belize who will co-teach the class for 5-6 weeks out of the semester. ANTH177401, LALS177401 World Latin America/Caribbean
HIST 076-401 Africa Since 1800 Lee V Cassanelli MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960s. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of naturalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa. AFRC076401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
World Africa/Middle East
HIST 081-401 Hist Mid East Since 1800 Eve M. Troutt Powell MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. NELC031401 History & Tradition Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below) World Africa/Middle East
HIST 089-401 Intro To Modern India Terenjit Sevea TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM SAST001401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. World East/South Asia
HIST 090-401 Knights with Katanas David Spafford CANCELED This course aims to provide an overview of some of the main themes and problems in the history and historiography of medieval Japan by drawing on comparisons with European counterparts and interpretive models. To this end, each week's readings on Japan are paired with one or more works on medieval Europe dealing with a similar theme. The primary purpose is not only to draw comparisons between the two civilizations and their development but also to use the great riches of scholarship on the European Middle Ages to shed light on possible new avenues of inquiry and perspectives on Japan. EALC171401 World East/South Asia, pre-1800
HIST 104-301 Why College? Jonathan L Zimmerman MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
HIST 106-301 Africa in World History Lee V Cassanelli MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
HIST 106-302 Dumplings, Bows, & Fermented Milk: the Silk Roads in 10 Objects Oscar Aguirre Mandujano TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
HIST 106-303 Private Life in China Si-Yen Fei R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
HIST 118-401 Witchcraft & Possession Robert St.George MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion. ANTH118401, GSWS119401, RELS109401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
American, European, Gender Europe, pre-1800, US
HIST 131-401 Financial Meltdown, Past and Present Marc R Flandreau TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond. ECON028401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Economic, European Europe
HIST 133-001 Free Speech & Censorship Sophia A Rosenfeld TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course will explore the idea of free speech - its justification, its relationship to various forms of censorship, and its proper limits - as a historical, philosophical, legal, and ultimately, political question. In the first half of the course, we will explore the long history across the West of the regulation of various kinds of ideas and their expression, from malicious gossip to heresies, and read classic arguments for and against censorship, copyright protections, and standards of taste and decency and of truth. In the second part of the seminar, after looking at how the idea of freedom of speech came to seem an existential prerequisite for democracy as well as individual liberty, we will take up the historical and philosophical questions posed by such recent dilemmas as whether or not hate speech deserves the protection of the First Amendment, the distinction between art and pornography from the perspective of freedom of expression, speech during wartime, and the transformative effects of the internet on the circulation and regulation of ideas. We will end the semester by thinking about the globalization of the idea of free speech as a human right and its implications, both positive and negative. Readings will range from Robert Darnton's The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France, to D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, to documents concerning the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo and law review articles about Citizens United v. FEC. We will also make considerable use of local resources, from museums to the library. Humanities & Social Science Sector American, European, Intellectual Europe, US
HIST 134-401 Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide Anne K Berg MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course. GRMN134401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
European Europe
HIST 140-401 Med & Early Mod Jewry Anne O Albert TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Follow the journey of one global diaspora over a millennium of cultural, intellectual, social, and religious change. From the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the separation of church and state in the seventeenth, Jewish people were intimate parts of, and at the same time utterly othered by, the many societies in which they lived. This basic duality is at the heart of this course, exploring how Jewish religion and culture evolved in relationship with Muslim and Christian majorities. Students will develop an understanding of the rich dynamism of premodern Judaism and Jewish life, with an emphasis on global diversity and internal differentiation as well as change over time. We will look for threads of continuity and moments of transformation, decode illustrative texts, images, and documents (in English), and ask how the Judaism that faced modernity had been shaped by a staggering array of different cultural circumstances after antiquity. The course includes attention to anti-Jewish phenomena like expulsion and blood libel, but also at coexistence and creative cultural synthesis, avoiding any simplistic narrative and asking about their legacy in the present day. It will look at the Jewish past from the inside, including less familiar dimensions including philosophy, magic, messianism, and family life. RELS121401, NELC052401, JWST157401 History & Tradition Sector European, Intellectual, Jewish, World Africa/Middle East, Europe, pre-1800
HIST 143-401 Foundations of European Thought: From Rome To the Renaissance Ann Elizabeth Moyer TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course offers an introduction to the world of thought and learning at the heart of European culture, from the Romans through the Renaissance. We begin with the ancient Mediterranean and the formation of Christianity and trace its transformation into European society. Along the way we will examine the rise of universities and institutions for learning, and follow the humanist movement in rediscovering and redefining the ancients in the modern world. COML143401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. European, Intellectual Europe, pre-1800
HIST 148-401 Warriors,Concubines,And Converts: the Ottoman Empire in the Mid East & Euro Oscar Aguirre Mandujano TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM For almost six hundred years, the Ottomans ruled most of the Balkans and the Middle East. From their bases in Anatolia, Ottoman armies advanced into the Balkans, Syria, Egypt, and Iraq, constantly challenging the borders of neighboring European and Islamicate empires. By the end of the seventeenth century, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Baghdad, Sarajevo, Budapest, and nearly Vienna came under Ottoman rule. As the empire expanded into Europe and the Middle East, the balance of imperial power shifted from warriors to converts, concubines, and intellectuals. This course examines the expansion of the Ottoman sultanate from a local principality into a sprawling empire with a sophisticated bureaucracy; it also investigates the social, cultural, and intellectual developments that accompanied the long arc of the empire's rise and fall. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and discuss major currents of change in the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. The student will have a better understanding of the roles of power, ideology, diplomacy, and gender in the construction of empire and a refined appreciation for diverse techniques of historical analysis. NELC148401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. Diplomatic, European, World Africa/Middle East, Europe, pre-1800
HIST 153-401 Transformations of Urban America: Making the Unequal Metropolis, 1945-Today Randall B Cebul MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization and stark inequality of cities in recent years. URBS104401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. American US
HIST 154-401 Histories of Race and Science in Philadelphia Paul J Mitchell W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The history of race and science has its American epicenter in Philadelphia. Throughout this Academically-Based Community Service (ABCS) course, we will interrogate the past and legacy of racial science in the United States; the broad themes we broach will be met concretely in direct engagement with Penn and the Philadelphia community. As an extended case study, students will undertake independent research projects using primary source documents from local archives, tracing the global history of hundreds of human skulls in the 19th century Samuel G. Morton cranial collection at the Penn Museum, a foundational and controversial anthropological collection in the scientific study of race. These projects will be formed through an ongoing partnership with a Philadelphia high school in which Penn students will collaborate with high school students on the research and design of a public-facing website on the Morton collection and the legacy of race and science in America. In our seminar, we will read foundational texts on the study of racial difference and discuss anti-racist responses and resistance to racial science from the 19th century to the present. Throughout, we will work directly with both primary and secondary sources, critically interrogating how both science and histories of science and its impacts on society are constructed. Throughout this course, we will explore interrelated questions about Penn and Philadelphia's outsize role in the history of racial science, about decolonization and ethics in scholarly and scientific practice, about the politics of knowledge and public-facing scholarship, and about enduring legacies of racial science and racial ideologies. All students are welcome and there are no prerequisites, save for intellectual curiosity and commitment to the course. This course will be of particular interest to those interested in race, American history and the history of science, anthropology, museum studies, education, and social justice. AFRC141401, STSC140401, ANTH140401 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Field Work (see below) American US
HIST 154-402 Histories of Race and Science in Philadelphia Paul J Mitchell The history of race and science has its American epicenter in Philadelphia. Throughout this Academically-Based Community Service (ABCS) course, we will interrogate the past and legacy of racial science in the United States; the broad themes we broach will be met concretely in direct engagement with Penn and the Philadelphia community. As an extended case study, students will undertake independent research projects using primary source documents from local archives, tracing the global history of hundreds of human skulls in the 19th century Samuel G. Morton cranial collection at the Penn Museum, a foundational and controversial anthropological collection in the scientific study of race. These projects will be formed through an ongoing partnership with a Philadelphia high school in which Penn students will collaborate with high school students on the research and design of a public-facing website on the Morton collection and the legacy of race and science in America. In our seminar, we will read foundational texts on the study of racial difference and discuss anti-racist responses and resistance to racial science from the 19th century to the present. Throughout, we will work directly with both primary and secondary sources, critically interrogating how both science and histories of science and its impacts on society are constructed. Throughout this course, we will explore interrelated questions about Penn and Philadelphia's outsize role in the history of racial science, about decolonization and ethics in scholarly and scientific practice, about the politics of knowledge and public-facing scholarship, and about enduring legacies of racial science and racial ideologies. All students are welcome and there are no prerequisites, save for intellectual curiosity and commitment to the course. This course will be of particular interest to those interested in race, American history and the history of science, anthropology, museum studies, education, and social justice. AFRC141402, STSC140402, ANTH140402 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Seminar (see below)
HIST 155-401 Intro To Asian Amer Hist Eiichiro Azuma TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course will provide an introduction to the history of Asian Pacific Americans, focusing on the wide diversity of migrant experiences, as well as the continuing legacies of Orientalism on American-born APA's. Issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality will also be examined. ASAM003401 History & Tradition Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. American, World East/South Asia, US
HIST 161-401 American Capitalism Walter Licht MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: European colonization of the western hemisphere; mercantilism and the British Economy; the economics of slavery; metro-industrialization; agricultural expansion and technological innovation in the nineteenth century; the growth and role of credit institutions; financial panics and business cycles; the evolution of federal government interventions into the economy; women and work; the dynamics of mass consumerism; the Great Depression and the New Deal; political economic shifts in post-World II America; forms of globalization; deindustrialization; the "financialization" of the American economy; and the economic disorders of our own times. ECON014401 Society Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below) American, Economic US
HIST 163-001 Modern American Culture Kathy Peiss MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Through the twentieth century, American culture took on new forms and meanings, spurred by technological innovation, commerce, and institutions, and shaped by an ever-changing population. In the process, American culture became self-consciously 'modern'-embraced, contested, repudiated, and continually redefined. This course explores the history of American culture from the 1890s to the 1990s, with a focus on the following questions: Why did culture become such an important part of American economic, social, and political life in the twentieth century? How has culture been created, understood, and mobilized by different groups in American society at different times? What have been the politics of culture over the twentieth century? Topics include the rise of 'culture industries' and mass entertainment, including amusement parks, film, radio, and television; the growth of consumer culture; the impact of gender in such arenas as sports and fashion; the role of working-class peoples, African Americans, and immigrants in American culture; the cultural response to the Depression and World War II; and popular activism. The course emphasizes the study of primary documents-journalism, fiction, letters and diaries, music, photographs, and film-as a means of understanding the past. History & Tradition Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST163001 American, Intellectual US
HIST 164-001 American Monuments Jared Farmer CANCELED Disputes over Confederate monuments expose a truth: The landscape of memory is a field of power. This place-based course examines U.S. public memory as expressed in the built environment--its making in the long nineteenth century, and its remaking in the long twentieth century. Lectures and readings cover a variety of memorial practices and structures, including obelisks, statues, edifices, cemeteries, battlefields, massacre sites, landmark buildings, and historic trees. (Museum collections, though important, will not be emphasized.) Drawing on cultural history, political history, and legal history, the instructor will help to explain the historic inscription of settler colonialism onto the nation's memorial landscape, and contextualize current efforts to decolonize U.S. public memory. For their part, students will have opportunities to do research on the monuments of Philadelphia. American US
HIST 169-401 History of American Law Karen Tani MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course covers the development of legal rules and principles concerning individual and group conduct in the United States since 1877. Such subjects as regulation and deregulation, legal education and the legal profession, and the legal status of women and minorities will be discussed. AFRC169401 Cultural Diversity in the US American, Intellectual US
HIST 170-401 The American South CANCELED Southern culture and history from 1607-1860, from Jamestown to seccession. Traces the rise of slavery and plantation society, the growth of Southern sectionalism and its explosion into Civil War. AFRC172401 History & Tradition Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HIST 173-401 Urb Univ-Community Rel: Faculty-Student Collaborative Action Seminar in Urban Univ-Comm Relations Ira Harkavy W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar helps students develop their capacity to solve strategic, real-world problems by working collaboratively in the classroom, on campus, and in the West Philadelphia community. Students develop proposals that demonstrate how a Penn undergraduate education might better empower students to produce, not simply "consume," societally-useful knowledge, as well as to function as caring, contributing citizens of a democratic society. Their proposals help contribute to the improvement of education on campus and in the community, as well as to the improvement of university-community relations. Additionally, students provide college access support at Paul Robeson High School for one hour each week. AFRC078401, URBS178401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST173401 American US
HIST 174-401 Capitalism, Socialism and Crisis in the 20th Century Americas Amy C Offner TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, socialism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How did US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required. LALS174401 History & Tradition Sector American, Diplomatic, Economic, World Latin America/Caribbean, US
HIST 175-401 History of Brazil Melissa Teixeira MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM In the past decade, Brazil has emerged a leading global power. As the world's fifth-largest country, by size and population, and the ninth-largest by GDP, Brazil exerts tremendous influence on international politics and the global economy, seen in its position as an emerging BRIC nation and a regional heavyweight in South America. Brazil is often in the news for its strides in social welfare, leading investments in the Global South, as host of the World Cup and Olympics, and, most recently, for its political instability. It is also a nation of deep contradictions, in which myth of racial democracy -- the longstanding creed that Brazilian society has escaped racial discrimination -- functions alongside pervasive social inequality, state violence, political corruption, and an unforgiving penal system. This course examines six centuries of Brazilian history. It highlights the interplay between global events -- colonialism, slavery and emancipation, capitalism, and democratization -- and the local geographies, popular cultures, and social movements that have shaped this multi-ethnic and expansive nation. In particular, the readings will highlight Brazil's place in Latin America and the Lusophone World, as well as the ways in which Brazil stands as a counterpoint to the United States, especially in terms of the legacy of slavery and race relation. In this lecture, we will also follow the current political and economic crises unfolding in Brazil, at a moment when it has become all the more important to evaluate just how South America's largest nation has shaped and been shaped by global events. LALS175401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. Economic, World Latin America/Caribbean
HIST 176-401 Afro Amer Hist Mia E Bay MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM This course will study the history of Afro-Americans from their first encounter with Europeans in the 16th century to emancipation during the Civil War. The course will concentrate on the variety of black responses to capture, enslavement, and forced acculturation in the New World. The difference in the slave experience of various New World countries, and the methods of black resistance and rebellion to varied slave systems will be investigated. The nature and role of the free black communities in antebellum America will also be studied. AFRC176401 History & Tradition Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. American pre-1800, US
HIST 214-301 Books That Changed Modern America Kathy Peiss T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Why have some books had a profound impact on their times? How have they articulated an issue, focused debate, captured public attention, and spurred action? In this seminar, we will read a group of books that changed the modern United States. The Jungle, Silent Spring, The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care, The Feminine Mystique, The Grapes of Wrath, Conscience of a Conservative: These are among the books that mobilized Americans to demand food safety and a safer environment, adopt new childrearing practices, redefine traditional gender roles, develop greater awareness of poverty, and rethink their politics. We will do close readings of these and other texts, and examine the history of each book as a book: its place within the author’s life and work, its publishing history, critical reception, and readers’ responses. Finally, we will consider the broader historical contexts in which the work was written, to assess its impact on American culture, society, and politics. Benjamin Franklin Seminars https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST214301 American, Intellectual Seminar, US
HIST 216-401 Religion & Colonial Rule in Africa Cheikh Ante MBAcke Babou R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the religious experiences of Africans and to the politics of culture. We will examine how traditional African religious ideas and practices interacted with Christianity and Islam. We will look specifically at religious expressions among the Yoruba, Southern African independent churches and millenarist movements, and the variety of Muslim organizations that developed during the colonial era. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, to develop in students an awareness of the wide range of meanings of conversion and people's motives in creating and adhering to religious institutions; Second, to examine the political, cultural, and psychological dimensions in the expansion of religious social movements; And third, to investigate the role of religion as counterculture and instrument of resistance to European hegemony. Topics include: Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements in Kenya and Tanzania, Chimurenga in Mozambique, Watchtower churches in Southern Africa, anti-colonial Jihads in Sudan and Somalia and mystical Muslim orders in Senegal. AFRC215401 Benjamin Franklin Seminars Diplomatic, Intellectual, World Africa/Middle East, Research, Seminar
HIST 216-402 Re-Reading the Holocaust Beth S. Wenger M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course explores how the Holocaust has been constructed as an historical event. Beginning in the mid-1940s, with the first attempts to narrate what had transpired during the Nazi era, this seminar traces the ways that the Holocaust became codified as a distinct episode in history. Taking a chronological approach, the course follows the evolution of historical and popular ideas about the Holocaust and considers the different perspectives presented by a variety of sources. We will examine documentary films, memoirs, survivor testimonies, as well as other scholarly and popular representations of the Holocaust. Students will be introduced to unfamiliar sources and also asked to reconsider some well-known Holocaust documents and institutions. JWST216402 Benjamin Franklin Seminars https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST216402 American, European, Jewish Europe, Research, Seminar, US
HIST 230-301 Medieval Justice Ada M Kuskowski W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary European, Intellectual Europe, pre-1800, Research, Seminar
HIST 230-302 Capitalism and Charity: the Long, Complicated Connection Thomas M. Safley R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Capitalism and charity seldom appear in the same sentence, much less the same title. They seem diametrically opposed. While capitalism is commonly understood as “an economic system based on the private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit”, according to Merriam-Webster, charity refers to “generosity and helpfulness especially toward the needy or suffering, also aid given to those in need”. The former implies self-interest, while the other breathes common interest. Yet, the two are closely, dynamically connected. As capitalism has emerged and evolved historically, so has charity changed to meet new circumstances and find new legitimations. From simple charity in the form of indiscriminate alms-giving have emerged “poor relief”, “work relief”, “social welfare” and, more recently “effective altruism” to name but a few permutations. Charity as a personal, face-to-face interaction between rich and poor has become cloaked in varieties of impersonal programs and institutions. This research seminar will explore the tensions (and synergies) between capitalism and charity over time. Through readings and discussions of primary sources, students will come to understand something of this historical dynamic. By completing independent research projects, they will contribute to that understanding as well. Economic, European Europe, pre-1800, Research, Seminar
HIST 230-401 Florence in History Ann Elizabeth Moyer T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Florence is justly famous for its art and learning, especially during the era of the Renaissance. It was also one of the most literate states in Europe during this era; thanks to the city’s 3 abundant records, it is one of the best-studied cities in Europe from the later Middle Ages through the early modern era. Our course readings present a mix of major primary sources, synthetic summaries, and important modern scholarship. Most of our class time will focus on the information and issues they raise. ITAL230401 European, Intellectual Europe, pre-1800, Seminar
HIST 231-301 Work & Workers in the Us Walter Licht T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM The subjects to be examined in this seminar on work and workers in the United States, include: industrialization and working-class protests movements in the nineteenth century; transformations of work under corporate capitalism; women, African Americans, immigrants and work; the rise of mass production unionism in the 1930s; deindustrialization and the eclipse of trade unionism; workers in contemporary America and blue color blues; and the future of work and new avenues for labor organizing. A number of films will be shown during the course of the semester and two field trips are planned. Requirements for the seminar include: the leading of discussions; three paper assignments; and engaged participation. American, Economic Seminar, US
HIST 231-302 The State of the Union Is Not Good: the US in Crisis in the 1970s Randall B Cebul T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Vietnam. Watergate. Deindustrialization. Inflation. Disco. These events and forces only begin to scratch the surface of the social, cultural, political, and economic transformations that remade American life in the 1970s and which, by 1975, forced President Gerald Ford to concede “that the state of the union is not good.” Beyond these familiar topics, this reading seminar will explore a range of developments that are crucial for understanding why the 1970s was perhaps the pivotal decade in making modern American politics, economics, and culture. Topics will include the fate of the Civil Rights movement and the war on crime; the rise and impact of second wave feminism; the rise of the modern conservative coalition (e.g., its religious, economic, and white working-class components); the emergence of the finance economy; the reorientation of organized labor and the remaking of the Democratic Party; the explosion of “therapeutic” cultures of self-help, individualism, and entrepreneurialism; and the rise of the Sunbelt as the nation’s dominant cultural, political, and economic region. American Seminar, US
HIST 231-303 Capitalism, Slavery and the Transformation of Indigenous Life Amy C Offner M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar explores the relationship between indigenous societies and the development of both slave and capitalist economies of the United States since the late eighteenth century. Readings will explore the experience of Native people as bound laborers and slaveowners; conflicts over the use and control of land and natural resources; the role of Native dispossession in the expansion of slavery and capitalism; twentieth-century Native economic life on reservations and in US cities; Native Americans in the Great Depression and the New Deal; and debates among Native people about capitalist development in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. American, Economic Seminar, US
HIST 231-401 Japanese-American Internment Eiichiro Azuma W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment. ASAM203401 American, Diplomatic Research, Seminar, US
HIST 231-402 History of Law and Social Change Mary Frances Berry R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This is a course in the history of law and social change. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will focus on the role law, lawyers, judges, other public officials and policy advocates and social movements and networks have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will focus on evaluating the importance or lack thereof of historical perspective and legal expertise in making social change. Assigned readings will be discussed in class. Each student will submit a paper based on primary and secondary material on a topic of her choosing within the overall subject matter of the course. Paper drafts will be discussed in class. The Final Paper is due at the beginning of the final examination period. AFRC229402 American Research, Seminar, US
HIST 233-401 Us-China Relations: From Open Door To Trade War Amy E Gadsden TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The list of issues shaping the US-China relationship is extensive. Trade and investment, the status and future of Taiwan, China’s expansion into the South China Sea and its relationships with East and Southeast Asian neighbors, human rights, technology transfer, intellectual property and cyberespionage, the status of people-to-people engagement in fields like education, health and cultural exchange and many others are ongoing points of discussion between the two great powers. Understanding these issues requires exploring the decades of interaction between the United States and China and how these issues have evolved over time. How does America’s open door policy of the late 19th century inform its position on trade with China today? What are the prospects for Taiwan policy given the complicated diplomatic history surrounding the recognition of the People’s Republic in the 1970s? When and why did human rights come to be a defining issue in the US-China relationship and how has it evolved over time? How have people-to-people exchanges been understood to undergird the relationship? This course will look at a series of issues that are at the center of the US-China relationship through an historical lens, providing students with insight into the forces that have shaped positions on both sides. Students will develop an understanding of key issues in the relationship; course assignments will include readings, leading discussion sessions, a longer seminar paper that explores an aspect of the US-China relationship from an historical perspective, and a policy memo that asks students to summarize the historical context and its relevance for policy-makers today. EALC141401 Diplomatic, World East/South Asia, Seminar
HIST 233-601 People and Power in Modern Mexico Juan Manuel Lombera MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Topics Vary LALS233601 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST233601 World Latin America/Caribbean, Seminar
HIST 237-401 Berlin: Hist Pol Culture Liliane Weissberg TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin. All readings and lectures in English. URBS237401, ARTH237401, GRMN237401, COML237401 Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
European Europe
HIST 242-401 Life Stories in America, 1730-1830 Robert St.George T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This seminar explores the social and cultural history of America by focusing on the lives of specific individuals, ranging from Jesuit priests in early Quebec to Philadelphia politicians to Saramaka slaves to Maine midwives. One of the people in Philadelphia who we will discuss is Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founding father. As we examine biography and autobiography as two of history's most powerful narrative frames, we will concentrate on the spaces and places in the social landscape that shaped individual understandings of work, sense of self, gender, beliefs, and political power. ENGL242401 American pre-1800, Seminar, US
HIST 245-401 Petrosylvania: Reckoning with Fossil Fuel Jared Farmer W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Fossil fuel powered the making--now the unmaking--of the modern world. As the first fossil fuel state, Pennsylvania led the United States toward an energy-intensive economy, a technological pathway with planetary consequences. The purpose of this seminar is to perform a historical accounting--and an ethical reckoning--of coal, oil, and natural gas. Specifically, students will investigate the histories and legacies of fossil fuel in connection to three entities: the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the City of Philadelphia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Under instructor guidance, students will do original research, some of it online, much the rest of it in archives, on and off campus, in and around Philadelphia. Philly-based research may also involve fieldwork. While based in historical sources and methods, this course intersects with business, finance, policy, environmental science, environmental engineering, urban and regional planning, public health, and social justice. Student projects may take multiple forms, individual and collaborative, from traditional papers to data visualizations prepared with assistance from the Price Lab for Digital Humanities. Through their research, students will contribute to a multi-year project that will ultimately be made available to the public. ENVS245401 American Seminar, US
HIST 258-401 Extreme Heat: White Nationalism in the Age of Climate Change Anne K Berg M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The Amazon is burning. The glaciers are melting. Heat waves, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, wildfires, and droughts devastate ever larger swaths of the earth, producing crop failures, air pollution, soil erosion, famine and terrifying individual hardship. At the same, time the so-called Western World is literally walling itself off from the millions who are fleeing from disaster and war with what little they can carry. White militants chant "blood and soil" and "Jews will not replace us," social media spreads memes and talking points about "white genocide" and "white replacement" and online ideologues fantasize about building white ethnostates. Are these developments connected? Is there a causal relationship? Or are these conditions purely coincidental? Increasingly, arguments about limits to growth, sustainability, development and climate change have come to stand in competitive tension with arguments for social and racial equality. Why is that case? What are the claims and underlying anxieties that polarize western societies? How do white nationalist movements relate to populist and fascist movements in the first half of the 20th century? What is new and different about them now? What is the relationship between environmentalism, rightwing populism and the climate crisis? And how have societies responded to the climate crisis, wealth inequality, finite resources and the threat posed by self-radicalizing white nationalist groups? ENVS258401 American, European Europe, Seminar, US
HIST 261-401 People's History of Pakistan CANCELED This course asks what Pakistan's history would look like when told from the perspective of the most marginalized groups in the country. Such an approach would demand that we jettison state-centered narratives and geopolitical frameworks. Instead, the course prioritizes the ethical imperative to tell the history of a place by including the voices and experiences of its people. It explores questions about how the state might appear differently in such narratives, as also about the impact of colonialism on the nation-state and its oppressed. Over the semester, we will investigate the responses, resistances, and revolts of marginalized groups that are facing intensified and intersecting oppression in a global and national context of surveillance, militarization, and capitalist exploitation. This course explores these urgent questions about the forces shaping the global present through the histories of the region, women, peasants, displaced persons, labor, and students in Pakistan. SAST261401 Gender, World East/South Asia, Seminar
HIST 273-401 Penn Slavery Project Res CANCELED This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge in to doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will be opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project. AFRC277401
HIST 275-401 Faces of Jihad in African Islam Cheikh Ante MBAcke Babou TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to provide the students with a broad understanding of the history of Islam in Africa. The focus will be mostly on West Africa, but we will also look at developments in other regions of the continent. We will explore Islam not only as religious practice but also as ideology and an instrument of social change. We will examine the process of islamization in Africa and the different uses of Jihad. Topics include prophetic jihad, jihad of the pen and the different varieties of jihad of the sword throughout the history in Islam in sub-Saharan Africa. AFRC274401 Cross Cultural Analysis Intellectual, World Africa/Middle East
HIST 276-401 Japan:Age of the Samurai David Spafford MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course deals with the samurai in Japanese history and culture and will focus on the period of samurai political dominance from 1185 to 1868, but it will in fact range over the whole of Japanese history from the development of early forms of warfare to the disappearance of the samurai after the Meiji Restoration of the 19th century. The course will conclude with a discussion of the legacy of the samurai in modern Japanese culture and the image of the samurai in foreign perceptions of Japan. EALC176401, EALC576401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST276401 World East/South Asia, pre-1800
HIST 314-001 Victorian Britain: Spaces, Places, and Pests Alex Chase-Levenson TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM In this course, we will examine the nooks and crannies of Victorian society. It was a period of squalor, but also innovation, devastating diseases, and crucial advances in public health and medical science. Its cities featured depressing slums and lurid crimes, but also new kinds of spectacles, entertainments, and commodities. It was, in many ways, as one of its greatest authors wrote, "the best of times, and the worst of times." Units under study will include "The Docks," "The Germs," "The Empire," "The Church," and "the Museum." We'll investigate killer diseases like cholera and typhus, dazzling buildings like the Crystal Palace, imperial wars and crises, and new scientific movements like Darwinism and mesmerism. Along the way, we will encounter proper and eminent Victorians as well as scandalous and marginalized ones. The aim will be to understand Victorian mentalities and ideas by looking at a diverse array of institutions and inventions. Readings will include novels, stories, pamphlets, essays, and cartoons as well as secondary literature. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and no previous experience in British history is necessary. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST314001 European Europe
HIST 322-401 American Slavery and the Law Heather A Williams W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM In this course, we will work both chronologically and thematically to examine laws, constitutional provisions, and local and federal court decisions that established, regulated, and perpetuated slavery in the American colonies and states. We will concern ourselves both with change over time in the construction and application of the law, and the persistence of the desire to control and sublimate enslaved people. Our work will include engagement with secondary sources as well as immersion in the actual legal documents. Students will spend some time working with murder cases from the 19th century South. They will decipher and transcribe handwritten trial transcripts, and will historicize and analyze the cases with attention to procedural due process as well as what the testimony can tell us about the social history of the counties in which the murders occurred. Students will have the opportunity to choose a topic and conduct original research using both primary and secondary sources, resulting in a 20-page research paper. We will spend a good deal of time throughout the semester learning how to research, write, and re-write a paper of this length. At the end of the semester students will present the highlights of their research to the class. AFRC322401 American US
HIST 343-401 19th Cent Eur Intel Hist Warren G. Breckman TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Starting with the dual challenges of Enlightenment and Revolution at the close of the eighteenth century, this course examines the emergence of modern European thought and culture in the century from Kant to Nietzsche. Themes to be considered include Romanticism, Utopian Socialism, early Feminism, Marxism, Liberalism, and Aestheticism. Readings include Kant, Hegel, Burke, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, Darwin, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche. COML343401 European, Intellectual Europe
HIST 360-401 The Enlightenment Joan Elizabeth Dejean CANCELED Topics vary. For current course description, please see the department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc Prerequisite: Two 200-level French courses taken at Penn or equivalent. FREN360401 Cross Cultural Analysis Benjamin Franklin Seminars European, Intellectual Europe, pre-1800
HIST 395-401 East Asian Diplomacy Frederick R. Dickinson MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. EALC505401, EALC105401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) Diplomatic, World East/South Asia
HIST 400-301 Senior Honors Warren G. Breckman M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Open to senior honors candidates in history who will begin writing their honors thesis during this seminar. Permission Needed From Department Research, Seminar
HIST 411-401 Tpcs History of the Book: American Books/Books in America James N Green
John Pollack
CANCELED What is the history of the book in the Americas? Over the past several decades, book history-more broadly, studies of the materialities of writing, printing, and reading-has been one of the most productive fields in American studies. This seminar aims to introduce students to topics in this field, focusing on the colonial era through the late 19th century. We will ground our studies in the rich collection holdings of the Library Company of Philadelphia and of the Kislak Center at the Penn Libraries. We will also read and discuss key works of scholarship in the field, while examining the sources those works use.
Topics we will investigate include:
• Colonial print cultures, the spread of printing, and the uses of writing and print in early America
• Print genres, including almanacs, primers, and broadsides
• Indigenous literacies
• The book trade, including manufacture, production, distribution, and consumption
• The rise of reading "publics" and of a "public sphere" formed by print in the 18th century
• Imported and domestic b0ok circulation
• African American print cultures
• Printing and the American Revolution
• Newspaper writing, reading, and circulation in the 18th and 19th centuries
• Book markets and the mechanization of printing in the 19th century
• Authorship and the making of "American" authors

While focusing primarily on the book histories of North America, we will also address related topics in Central and South America, and we welcome students from all fields. No advance training in bibliography is required, and we will all learn how to look closely at "old books." Sessions will meet either in the Kislak Center (6th floor, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library) or at The Library Company of Philadelphia (1314 Locust Street).
ENGL234401 American, Intellectual pre-1800, US
HIST 420-001 European Ir 1648 - 1914 Walter A Mcdougall TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will examine the international politics of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries, up to the outbreak of World War I. During these centuries, the European great powers experienced significant internal transformations and also a revolution in their relations, both of which reinforced and accelerated each other. In the process, Europe asserted a dominant position in world politics, but also sowed the seed for the terrible castrophes of the 20th Century. The course will address this transformation of European diplomacy with special attention to the rivalries between the great powers, the impact of nationalism and emerging mass politics, the interplay between military and economic power, and the relationship between the European powers and the rest of the world. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST420001 Diplomatic, European Europe
HIST 440-401 Perspectives On Urban Poverty Robert P Fairbanks W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions. SOCI420401, URBS420401 Cultural Diversity in the US American, Economic US
HIST 620-301 Topics in European Hist: Brit & Fren Imperialism Alex Chase-Levenson W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in European History.
HIST 620-302 Topics in European Hist: Readings in Soviet Hist Benjamin Nathans M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Reading and Discussion course on selected topics in European History.
HIST 630-301 Topics in Asian History: Late Imperia & Mod China Si-Yen Fei T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Asian History. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HIST630301
HIST 660-301 Topis in Lat Am/Carrib: Law&Econ: Lat Am& Beyond Melissa Teixeira T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Latin American and Caribbean history
HIST 668-301 Hist of Law & Soc Policy Mary Frances Berry W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This is a course in the history of law and policy-making with respect to selected social problems. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will elaborate the role law, lawyers, judges, other public official and policy advocates have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will permit theevaluation of the importance of historical perspective and legal expertise in policy debates.
HIST 670-301 Topics:Transregional His: 10 Ways of Doing Econ Hi Marc R Flandreau R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History
HIST 700-301 Prosem in History: the Study of History Daniel K Richter R 10:00 AM-01:00 PM Weekly readings, discussions, and writing assignments to develop a global perspective within which to study human events in various regional/cultural milieus, c. 1400 to the present. Permission Needed From Department
HIST 710-301 Research Sem: Amer Hist: American & Afro-Amer His Mia E Bay T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Research seminar on selected topics in American history.