American

HIST463 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUC

Description: 
This course will examine the growth and development of American schools, from the colonial era into the present. By 1850, the United States sent a greater fraction of its children to school than any other nation on earth. Why? What did young people learn there? And, most of all, how did these institutions both reflect and shape our evolving conceptions of “America” itself? In an irreducibly diverse society, the answers were never simple. Americans have always defined their nation in a myriad of contrasting and often contradictory ways. So they have also clashed vehemently over their schools, which remain our central public vehicle for deliberating and disseminating the values that we wish to transmit to our young. Our course will pay close attention to these education-related debates, especially in the realms of race, class, and religion. When immigrants came here from other shores, would they have to relinquish their old cultures and languages? When African-Americans won their freedom from bondage, what status would they assume? And as different religious denominations fanned out across the country, how would they balance the uncompromising demands of faith with the pluralistic imperatives of democracy? All of these questions came into relief at school, where the answers changed dramatically over time. Early American teachers blithely assumed that newcomers would abandon their old-world habits and tongues; today, “multicultural education” seeks to preserve or even to celebrate these distinctive patterns. Post-emancipation white philanthropists designed vocational curricula for freed African-Americans, imagining blacks as loyal serfs; but blacks themselves demanded a more academic education, which would set them on the road to equality. Protestants and Catholics both used the public schools to teach their faith systems until the early 1960s, when the courts barred them from doing so; but religious controversies continue to hound the schools, especially on matters like evolution and sex education. How should our public schools address such dilemmas? How can the schools provide a “common” education, as Horace Mann called it, melding us into an integrated whole while still respecting our inevitable differences?
Instructors: 
ZIMMERMAN, JONATHAN
Day and Time: 
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Room: 
EDUCATION BUILDING 203
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US
    • Major Concentrations: American
    • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US

    HIST451 - US AND THE WORLD SINCE 1898

    Description: 
    This class examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power since 1898, and considers both the international and domestic consequences of U.S. foreign relations. In one respect, the twentieth century was a strange time to become a global empire: it was the period when colonial systems centered in Europe, Russia, Japan, and Turkey collapsed, and new nations emerged throughout Africa and Asia. This class explores the changing strategies of military, economic, and political intervention that the U.S. pursued as colonization lost legitimacy. Within that framework, the class invites students to think about several questions: How did the idea and practice of empire change over the twentieth century? How did the United States relate to new visions of independence emerging in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How did global interactions both inform and reflect racial ideology in the United States? Finally, how did international affairs transform U.S. politics and social movements?
    Instructors: 
    OFFNER, AMY
    Day and Time: 
    TR 1200PM-0130PM
    Room: 
    ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111
    Activity: 
    LEC
    Cross Listings: 
      Syllabus: 

      HIST349 - HIST OF SEXUALITY IN US

      Description: 
      This course explores the history of sexuality in the U.S. Centrally, it explores the past to consider why sexuality has become so central American identities, culture, and politics. Using both primary and secondary sources, we will explore the relationship between expression, regulation, ideology, and resistance; trace the emergence of distinct sexual cultures and identities; and interrogate the relationship between sexuality and other forms of social difference such as gender, class and race. We will also explore the relationship between sexuality and state building, both domestically and transnationally. Topics include reproduction, censorship, sexual violence, gay and lesbian identities, slavery, and the politics of sexually transmitted disease.
      Instructors: 
      LAKHANI, ZAIN
      Day and Time: 
      MW 0200PM-0330PM
      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 314

      Activity: 
      LEC
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

        HIST367 - PHILADELPHIA 1700-2000

        Description: 
        This course will trace and explore the important history and role of Philadelphia in the founding of the United States from the pre-colonial era to the present. It will not be simply a celebration of elite figures and historical events and sites around the city, but an in-depth examination of the social, cultural, and political events that shaped a city and a nation as well as an evaluation of how we view this history today. While the course focuses on Philadelphia, we will also make connections to the larger history of Pennsylvania, the Delaware Valley, and the Middle Atlantic region in general.
        Instructors: 
        HANSON, RICHARD
        Day and Time: 
        T 0600PM-0900PM
        Room: 

        WILLIAMS HALL 219

        Activity: 
        LEC
        Cross Listings: 
          This is an LPS course. Registration may be limited to LPS students.
          • Major Concentrations: American
          • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US

          HIST411 - INTRO TO PRINT CULTURE

          Instructors: 
          STALLYBRASS, PETER
          CHARTIER, ROGER
          Day and Time: 
          M 0200PM-0500PM
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Registration Notes: 
            CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO

            HIST231 - CONFLICT, LAW AND JUSTICE IN EARLY AMERICA: CROSS-CULTURAL APPROACHES

            Description: 
            This course provides a comparative study of law and legal pluralism in the early North American borderlands. From the sixteenth century through the early nineteenth century, Europeans, Native peoples, African descended peoples, and mixed race peoples committed acts of violence throughout the borderlands. People trespassed on land, killed other people and livestock, and stole property–non-human and human. In the resolution of intercultural conflicts, European and Native systems of law clashed. When a Menominee named Achiganaga allegedly killed two French traders in 1682, or when a Georgian official shot a Chehaw prisoner during an alleged escape attempt in 1802, or when Spanish officials accused Lower Creeks Juan and Jorge Galphin of raiding plantations on the Florida–Georgia border and taking seven slaves, eleven horses, and ninety heads of cattle in 1793–whose law governed the outcome? How and under what authority did Europeans prosecute indigenous people for murder? How did Native law impose justice when Europeans killed indigenous people? How did free and enslaved African Americans exercise legal power in both European and Native legal regimes? In other words, how and why did people from different cultures make their understandings of law intelligible to one another in violent contests over land, property, and freedom? Finally, how did these plural legal orders change over time? In this seminar, we will explore these questions to uncover the nature of legal pluralism and the ways it shaped the multiple meanings of law, justice, sovereignty, empire, and slavery in early North America. Drawing on a mix of primary and secondary sources, we will discuss competing ideologies and jurisdictional disputes in the constitution of law. We will also examine conceptual approaches to analyze how legal pluralism defined relations between Native peoples, African Americans, and settlers in early North America. Ultimately, we will consider how the legal complexity of the early modern era informs our understanding of the meanings of law and justice in the present day.
            Instructors: 
            GALLMAN, NANCY
            Day and Time: 
            R 0300PM-0600PM
            Room: 

            COLLEGE HALL 311F

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST231 - AMERICAN CULTURE WARS: SOCIETY, MORALITY, AND POLITICS

              Description: 
              Should statues of Confederate soldiers be taken down? Is it appropriate for football players to kneel during the national anthem? How should the United States treat refugees from predominantly Muslim nations? These questions are only the latest battlefields in the “culture wars,” the long-running conversation—or, more often, shouting match—about what the United States ought to stand for and how Americans ought to live. This seminar will explore how Americans have wrestled with questions of morality and national identity since the country’s founding. Two questions will drive our discussion. First, why do certain issues become the subject of fierce cultural conflict in American life? Second, do these conflicts enrich or undermine American democracy? We will focus on four moments in the history of the culture wars: the disestablishment of churches in the early United States; opposition to immigration, particularly of Jews and Catholics, in the late nineteenth century; campaigns to prohibit alcohol, culminating in the Eighteenth Amendment; and recent clashes over the expansion of gay rights. In each case we will explore the worldviews and experiences of Americans engaged in these conflicts, drawing on primary sources that will range from presidential debates and congressional speeches to cartoons and popular songs. At the semester’s end, students will write a lecture or research paper on a “culture war” topic of their choosing. Potential subjects include juvenile delinquency, the teaching of evolution, affirmative action, or gun control. **RESEARCH REQUIREMENT OPTIONAL**
              Instructors: 
              SCHULTZ, WILLIAM
              Day and Time: 
              W 0330PM-0630PM
              Room: 

              COLLEGE HALL 217

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST231 - TOPICS IN US HISTORY: EARLY AMERICAN STUDIES

                Description: 
                Nowadays many Early Americanists have turned to cultural history. There have been different reasons for such a shift, which is built on solid empirical foundations laid by demographers and social historians beginning in the early 1960s. One contributing element was surely the history of early American religion, always interested in what sermons and doctrinal reform meant for clergy and laity alike. Another element came from cultural anthropology, with its interest in specific communities and the textual webs of symbolic meaning that tied families to families, and individuals to one another. American art and material culture offered its concern with social aesthetics and questions of exchange value. Still another set of connections came as the walls between early American literature and early American history--disciplinary fences, as it were-- started to crumble. But no matter the perspective taken, these approaches intersect in reconstructing the systems of meaning that held colonial societies together and, on occasion, signaled their transformation. This semester we will be examining key moments in the emergence of the field, works that explore interdisciplinary methods and theoretical approaches as well as offering new models for historical narrative itself. And while most of our readings and discussion will explore changes in early American culture between 1600 and 1785-- or roughly from the period of imperial exploration and initial settlement to the Revolutionary settlement, and native reactions to settlement colonialism-- some aspects of early national and antebellum culture will fall within consideration.
                Instructors: 
                ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
                Day and Time: 
                R 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 

                COLLEGE HALL 311A

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST231 - JAPANESE-AMERICAN INTERNMENT

                  Description: 
                  This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
                  Instructors: 
                  AZUMA, EIICHIRO
                  Day and Time: 
                  T 0130PM-0430PM
                  Room: 
                  COLLEGE HALL 217
                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

                    HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS

                    Description: 
                    Students in this seminar will choose their own research topic in the history of feminism. With guidance and support each person will produce a twenty-page paper based on intensive work with primary sources. Our shared readings will focus on the sometimes overlapping and sometimes divergent feminist histories that can be traced in the writings and cultural products of people in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. We’ll take a long view, beginning in the sixteenth century, and use an expansive frame. Our purpose will not be to decide who was or wasn’t ‘a feminist’ but instead to try to understand the social life of ideas that included aspects of what more recent activists mean by the term, while also being attentive to the reasons why actions and concepts from past worlds can’t be imported very easily into our own.
                    Instructors: 
                    FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
                    Day and Time: 
                    M 0200PM-0500PM
                    Room: 
                    COLLEGE HALL 318
                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
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