HIST175 - SOCIETY & CULT IN BRAZIL

Description: 
With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy?" What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil? To answer these and other questions, our course takes a long and expansive view of Brazilian history. We begin with an exploration of Brazil’s early formation as a Portuguese colony in the sixteenth century before moving on to tracing its development as one of the largest and longest-lasting slaveholding societies in the world. >From there we will examine the gradual process of abolition in the region, the transition to an independent republic in the nineteenth century, as well as the nation-building projects and political crises of the twentieth century. We will conclude with an analysis of the major issues shaping modern Brazilian society and culture.
Instructors: 
WALKER, TAMARA
Day and Time: 
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Room: 
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
  • AFRC175401
  • LALS175401
Registration Notes: 
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS