HIST231 - DOES AMERICAN JEWISH THOUGHT HAVE A HISTORY?

Description: 
When we think of Modern Jewish Thought we often think of western and eastern European Jewish philosophers and theologians while much of the study of American Judaism has been relegated to social and cultural history. This suggests that American Judaism does not have its own “thought” and simply borrows theological categories from European thinkers. This course will be based on a question “Does American Jewish thought have a history?” We will explore this question by looking at the writings of a series of American Jewish intellectuals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to examine the distinctive nature of their thinking about Judaism in an American context. Topics such as race (and slavery in particular), democracy, assimilation, pragmatism, communism/socialism, Zionism and dual allegiance, the melting pot, cultural pluralism, religious pluralism, multiculturalism, feminism, and New Age religion, will be examined through a series of Jewish thinkers in America whose “thought,” while drawing from European paradigms (e.g. idealism, existentialism, Marxism, etc.) are distinctly “American” because they are responding to trends and challenges distinctive to the American Jewish experience.
Instructors: 
MAGID, SHAUL
Day and Time: 
W 0330PM-0630PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 318

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • JWST215403
Registration Notes: 
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US