HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias

Description: 
This course engages scholarship on colonialism and empire in the context of Spanish settlement in North America, in the region stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, known as the Spanish borderlands. We will examine the exploration, colonization, and expansion by Spanish officials and settlers as well as their attempts to impose an imperial vision of race, religion, and law on the lives of Native peoples, African Americans, and other Europeans in East and West Florida, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Alta and Baja California. We will also compare European conquests (Spanish, French, and English) and various independence movements across North America (the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and Mexican Independence) to understand how and why these events succeeded or failed and their connections to the Spanish borderlands. We will conclude by considering the extent to which borderlands histories are essential to the study of early America as they reflect culturally dynamic experiences in areas that would later become part of the United States and its legacy of empire.
Instructors: 
GALLMAN, NANCY
Day and Time: 
R 0300PM-0600PM
Room: 

MEYERSON HALL B7

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US