HIST233 - KOREA IN AGE OF EMPIRES

Description: 
This seminar examines Korea’s historical relations with various imperial powers from the early modern period to the present. Korean states faced off the Mongol invasions in the 1250s, maintained largely peaceable, if delicate relations with the Ming and Qing empires in China from the fourteenth to eighteenth centuries, and balanced competing Western imperial powers, but succumbed to Japanese colonization after 1910. After Korea’s liberation in 1945, rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States led to Korea’s present division between North and South. What explains the differences and similarities between these epochs? How did Korean polities negotiate their political autonomy and cultural identity over this period? What informed the choices of individual Korean actors to resist, appropriate, or collaborate with empire? How do the legacies of this history inform North and South Korea in the international system of today? This course will also interrogate the relationship between international relations and human agency, by thinking about “empire” not only as an imposition by a foreign powers, but also the institutions and ideologies of empire were employed by Korean actors. It will therefore also explore Korean use of the ideologies these empires espoused, such as Confucianism, Modernism, Nationalism, and Communism, in addition to how they were contested among Koreans themselves. It will therefore also pay particular attention to the perspectives of individuals whose lives were intertwined or impacted by these histories. Fulfills History major and minor’s East/South Asia, research (R), and seminar requirements as well as counting as a Diplomatic History Concentration course.
Instructors: 
WANG, SIXIANG
Day and Time: 
M 0330PM-0630PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 318

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • EALC141403
Syllabus: 
Registration Notes: 
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS