HIST233 - MODERN MEXICAN SOCIETY

Description: 
This course is an introduction to the social, economic, and political development of modern Mexico. We start with an analysis of the effect that colonial patterns of domination had on Mexican society after independence in the early 19th century. Thereafter, two centuries of state and nation formation are examined. Throughout this period, the course explores issues such as class structure, race, gender, national identity, the role of the church, foreign influences, modernization, social movements, authoritarianism, revolution, economic cycles, and the development of civil society. One of the central themes that runs troughout all of Mexico’s history is the challenge for the Mexican government to enforce and for Mexican society to abide by the law: from colonial times when the viceroys "obeyed, but did not comply" with the King's orders, to the golden years of the PRI regime, when the law was usually understood as "negotiable," to the present time, when drug trafficking organizations overpower or co-opt law enforcement institutions, the weakness in the rule of law is analyzed as one of the greatest impediments for Mexican prosperity and social development. By the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of the complexity of Mexican society and of the current issues facing the country’s leaders, including how to approach globalization, how to constructively integrate its economy with that of the U.S. through NAFTA, how to assess the impact of migration of undocumented workers, and how to confront drug violence.
Instructors: 
LOMBERA, JUAN
Day and Time: 
MW 0630PM-0800PM
Room: 
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • LALS431601
  • SOCI431601
Registration Notes: 
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS