HIST610 - TOPICS IN AMERICAN HIST: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HIST

Description: 
This seminar is designed to acquaint graduate students with broad issues and debates in the history of American religious life. The field of religious history is vibrant and rigorous, so there is plenty to work with. While the chronological span of the course is long, there are distinct and sometimes overlapping sub-themes to this course, and members of the seminar are encouraged to focus on one or more of these in their written work and oral presentations. These themes include: 1. Theology, doctrine and religious institutions; 2. Politics, political parties, constitutional law (state as well as federal); 3. War, diplomacy, empire, and transnational influences; 4. Race, slavery, and equality; 5. Evangelizing, missions and missionaries, and migration; 6. Violence, conquest and empire; 7. Dissent, schism, and pluralism; 8. Education, poor relief, and reform. The course will proceed (roughly) chronologically, but will have additional and recommended readings. We will spend much of our time reading recent work, with a few enduring classics tossed in both to our additional sources, and occasionally in core reading for each week. In addition, although this is designed to be an Americanist reading course, we will integrate some texts that address wider Atlantic, Pacific, and perhaps even hemispheric themes. Reading runs from about 200 – 350 pages per week, almost always drawn from two or more sources. It is important to think about these sources in dialogue with each other, as well as with the broader historiography of their subfields. The course concludes with several readings from cognate disciplines, probing their sense of how the category “religion” should be understood.
Instructors: 
GORDON, SARAH
Day and Time: 
M 0200PM-0500PM
Room: 

VAN PELT LIBRARY 402

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: