HIST630 - TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY: CHINA'S WARS SINCE 1894-1895

Description: 
The Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) ended in war; the two Chinese states that succeeded it were also almost constantly fighting, both internally and with external foes. Today war once again threatens East, Southeast, and South Asia. This course provides a solid narrative of more than a century of war-fighting in these regions. It looks at the causes, courses, and strategies both of direct engagement and of indirect assistance. It also compares the imperatives of internal struggles with external. Beginning with Japan’s first defeat of the Qing in 1894-95, it examines ethnic hostilities in the subsequent Chinese overthrow of the Manchus, and then the dynamics of intra-Chinese political fighting for control of government. Substantial attention is paid to the pivotal war against the Japanese invasion of 1937-1945. The conflicts of the People’s Republic of China are also examined, right up to the present Asian face-off over the South China Sea. Although neither fiction nor art is specifically assigned, students in this course are encouraged to look not only at the military aspects of conflicts, but also at their economic and social effects, as well as the ways that they were understood by participants and represented in the arts including visual and literature. The instructor welcomes novel approaches taken by students, after consultation. Requirements: Attendance at Seminar; Research Paper (15-40 pages; 60%); Seminar presentation of one of the assigned readings (40%)
Instructors: 
WALDRON, ARTHUR
Day and Time: 
T 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 
COLLEGE HALL 311F
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
  • EALC726401
Syllabus: