pre-1800

HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias

Description: 
This course engages scholarship on colonialism and empire in the context of Spanish settlement in North America, in the region stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, known as the Spanish borderlands. We will examine the exploration, colonization, and expansion by Spanish officials and settlers as well as their attempts to impose an imperial vision of race, religion, and law on the lives of Native peoples, African Americans, and other Europeans in East and West Florida, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Alta and Baja California. We will also compare European conquests (Spanish, French, and English) and various independence movements across North America (the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and Mexican Independence) to understand how and why these events succeeded or failed and their connections to the Spanish borderlands. We will conclude by considering the extent to which borderlands histories are essential to the study of early America as they reflect culturally dynamic experiences in areas that would later become part of the United States and its legacy of empire.
Instructors: 
GALLMAN, NANCY
Day and Time: 
R 0300PM-0600PM
Room: 

MEYERSON HALL B7

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

    HIST233 - HIST PRIVATE LIFE CHINA

    Description: 
    Underneath the grandeur of empires, war, revolutions, history eventually is about people’s life. This seminar explores how the boundaries of private life in China intersect with the public arena and how such an intersection has significantly re-shaped Chinese private life between the 16th century and the present. The first half of the seminar will explore how the private realm in late imperial China was defined and construed by Confucian discourses, architectural design, moral regulation, cultural consumption, and social network. Moving into the twentieth century, the remaining part of the seminar will examine how the advent of novel concepts such as modernity and revolution restructured the private realm, particularly in regard to the subtopics outlined above. Organizing questions include: How did female chastity become the center of a public cult which then changed the life paths of countless families? How did the practice of female foot-binding intersect with marriage choices, household economy, and social status? How did print culture create a new space for gentry women to negotiate the boundaries between their inner quarters and the outside world? What was the ideal and reality of married life in late imperial China? How did people’s life change when the collective pursuit for Chinese modernity placed romantic love, freedom to marry and divorce at the center of public debates? How was “Shanghai modern” related to the emerging middle class life style as evidenced in advertisement posters? How has the ideal of gender equality been re-interpreted and realized under the Communist regime? How have the current market reforms reformulated the contours of private life in China?
    Instructors: 
    FEI, SI-YEN
    Day and Time: 
    M 0200PM-0500PM
    Room: 

    CASTER BUILDING A19

    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 

      HIST248 - HAITIAN REVOLUTION

      Description: 
      In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters and plantation overseers, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the legal abolition of racial discrimination, and then the abolition of slavery, throughout the French Empire. Ultimately, when Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence. After defeating the Napoleonic army, these former slaves then declared the world’s first “Black Republic,” the independent state of Haiti, in 1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti’s colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France’s leading role in the intellectual movement called the “Enlightenment” coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and points of connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue. When the Haitian Revolution began in 1791, the French Revolution was already two years old: how did the increasingly radical ideas and widespread violence in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents? And how, in turn, did the revolution in Saint Domingue impact the revolution in France? From a diplomatic perspective, we will also consider relations between the Haitian Revolutionary leadership and French officials, examining their respective goals, which overlapped and diverged at different moments. Finally, we will ask how the revolution in Saint Domingue—and the birth of Haiti--impacted ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic world. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. Students are encouraged to read primary documents in the original French if they are able. A final research paper will be required of all students, drawing on the Kislak Center’s rich collection of revolutionary-era documents.
      Instructors: 
      FABELLA, YVONNE
      Day and Time: 
      W 0200PM-0500PM
      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 315A

      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST307 - LOVE, LUST AND VIOLENCE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

        Description: 
        Medieval Europe was undoubtedly gruff and violent but it also gave birth to courtly culture - raw worries transformed into knights who performed heroic deeds, troubadours wrote epics in their honor and love songs about their ladies, women of the elite carved out a place in public discourse as patrons of the arts, and princely courts were increasingly defined by pageantry from jousting tournaments to royal coronations. This course will trace the development of this courtly culture from the eleventh to the sixteenth century, from its roots in Southern France to its spread to Northern France and then to various kingdoms in Europe.
        Instructors: 
        KUSKOWSKI, ADA
        Day and Time: 
        MW 0200PM-0330PM
        Room: 

        COLLEGE HALL 318

        Activity: 
        LEC
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

          HIST309 - AGE OF REFORMATION

          Description: 
          The Protestant Reformation of the 16th century was a watershed in European history. It marked the culmination of centuries of religious, political and social change and had profound institutional and intellectual consequences. We will examine the central teachings and activities of the Protestant reformers against this broad background. Topics will include: medieval traditions of religious protest and reform; social and political changes in the period of the Reformation; the changing role of the Papacy; and the impact of the new technology of printing. Readings will be both primary texts and secondary sources and discussions will be an integral part of the class.
          Instructors: 
          SAFLEY, THOMAS
          Day and Time: 
          TR 0130PM-0300PM
          Room: 

          COLLEGE HALL 318

          Activity: 
          LEC
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST211 - THE ENLIGHTENMENT

            Instructors: 
            DEJEAN, JOAN
            Day and Time: 
            M 0200PM-0500PM
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Registration Notes: 
              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

              HIST211 - THE MESSIANIC IMPULSE IN JEWISH HISTORY

              Description: 
              Among Judaism’s foundational ideas is the notion of a messiah, a messianic age, and a final denouement of history culminating in a perfect world of harmony and peace. The idea has served both to inspire Jews that despite hardships of their collective past, there was a bright future waiting for them on the horizon. At the same time the messianic idea was also unsettling and destabilizing, assuming a quick and unnatural disruption of their normative Jewish life in Israel and the diaspora. This dual or dialectic function of the messianic idea, as Gershom Scholem once described it,---to restore the previous existence and stability Jews once had but had lost or to establish instead something entirely new, a supernatural utopia unlike anything previously experienced, represents one of the principal foci of this course. The seminar will discuss the history of Jewish messianic ideas and messianism from antiquity until the present through reading primary sources in translation, including how rabbis, philosophers, and kabbalists understood the idea. It will linger on the most important messianic figure of pre-modern times, Shabbetai Zevi, the seventeenth century messianic mystic and his movement. It will also consider the secularized versions of messianism in the modern era as reflected in Reform Judaism, Zionism and socialism; and it will consider the contemporary manifestations of messianic behavior in modern Israel and among diaspora Jewry.
              Instructors: 
              RUDERMAN, DAVID
              Day and Time: 
              W 0330PM-0630PM
              Room: 

              MCNEIL BUILDING 409

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 
                Registration Notes: 
                BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

                HIST230 - FLORENCE IN HISTORY

                Description: 
                Florence is justly famous for its art and learning, especially during the era of the Renaissance. It was also one of the most literate states in Europe during this era; thanks to the city’s 3 abundant records, it is one of the best-studied cities in Europe from the later Middle Ages through the early modern era. Our course readings present a mix of major primary sources, synthetic summaries, and important modern scholarship. Most of our class time will focus on the information and issues they raise.
                Instructors: 
                MOYER, ANN
                Day and Time: 
                T 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 
                MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST168 - HIST OF AMER LAW TO 1877

                  Description: 
                  The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.
                  Instructors: 
                  BERRY, MARY
                  Day and Time: 
                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                  Room: 
                  COLLEGE HALL 314
                  Activity: 
                  LEC
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

                    HIST176 - AFRO AMER HIST

                    Instructors: 
                    WILLIAMS, HEATHER
                    Day and Time: 
                    MW 0200PM-0330PM
                    Room: 
                    MCNEIL BUILDING 285
                    Activity: 
                    LEC
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
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