pre-1800

HIST308 - RENAISSANCE EUROPE

Description: 
This course will examine the cultural and intellectual movement known as the Renaissance, from its origins in fourteenth-century Italy to its diffusion into the rest of Europe in the sixteenth century. We will trace the great changes in the world of learning and letters, the visual arts, and music,along with those taking place in politics, economics, and social organization. We will be reading primary sources as well as modern works.
Instructors: 
MOYER, ANN
Day and Time: 
CANCELED
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 

    HIST276 - JAPAN:AGE OF THE SAMURAI

    Instructors: 
    SPAFFORD, DAVID
    Day and Time: 
    MW 0330PM-0500PM
    Room: 

    WILLIAMS HALL 202

    Activity: 
    LEC
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

      HIST308 - RENAISSANCE EUROPE

      Instructors: 

      MOYER, ANN

      Day and Time: 

      TR 1030AM-1200PM

      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 318

      Activity: 
      LEC

      HIST313 - FRENCH REVOLUTION AND THE ORIGINS OF MODERN POLITICS

      Description: 
      This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and especially political history of France and its overseas (especially Caribbean) empire from the end of the Old Regime through the Napoleonic period. The origins, development, and outcome of the French Revolution, followed by the Haitian Revolution, will be our main focus. Particular attention will be paid to the global legacy of these two late 18th-century revolutions in terms of such key modern political concepts as human rights, nationalism, social welfare, feminism, democracy, terrorism, and revolution itself. Throughout the course, we will also emphasize the different and often conflicting ways in which historians have interpreted the meaning and consequences of this critical moment of upheaval. Readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine lecture and discussion. Requirements will be one mid-term examination (15%), one short paper of 4 pages (15%), one final paper of 8-9 pages (30%), and one final examination (30%), as well as class participation (10%).
      Instructors: 
      ROSENFELD, SOPHIA
      Day and Time: 
      TR 0130PM-0300PM
      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 314

      Activity: 
      LEC
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST411 - INTRO TO PRINT CULTURE

        Instructors: 
        STALLYBRASS, PETER
        CHARTIER, ROGER
        Day and Time: 
        M 0200PM-0500PM
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO

          HIST230 - WAR AND CONQUEST IN THE MIDDLE AGES

          Description: 
          This course will focus on wars of conquest in the medieval period. The code of chivalry demanded that knights not only display great prowess in battle, but also adhere to Christian virtue. How did these square in practice? What constitutes acceptable violence and military intervention? We will seek to understand the medieval mentality of warfare in order to think about the place of war in society, how war was justified, why war was fought, and how it was fought. War, however, cannot be separated from its goals. We will thus go beyond the battlefield to look at how conquest of territories was cemented with the establishment and enforcement of a new order. Themes will include the rise of knighthood, ideas of just war, crusade, laws of war, territorial control and colonization. The course will also include two fabulous field trips to visit Penn’s manuscript collection and the arms and armor collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
          Instructors: 
          KUSKOWSKI, ADA
          Day and Time: 
          T 0130PM-0430PM
          Room: 

          COLLEGE HALL 311F

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST231 - CONFLICT, LAW AND JUSTICE IN EARLY AMERICA: CROSS-CULTURAL APPROACHES

            Description: 
            This course provides a comparative study of law and legal pluralism in the early North American borderlands. From the sixteenth century through the early nineteenth century, Europeans, Native peoples, African descended peoples, and mixed race peoples committed acts of violence throughout the borderlands. People trespassed on land, killed other people and livestock, and stole property–non-human and human. In the resolution of intercultural conflicts, European and Native systems of law clashed. When a Menominee named Achiganaga allegedly killed two French traders in 1682, or when a Georgian official shot a Chehaw prisoner during an alleged escape attempt in 1802, or when Spanish officials accused Lower Creeks Juan and Jorge Galphin of raiding plantations on the Florida–Georgia border and taking seven slaves, eleven horses, and ninety heads of cattle in 1793–whose law governed the outcome? How and under what authority did Europeans prosecute indigenous people for murder? How did Native law impose justice when Europeans killed indigenous people? How did free and enslaved African Americans exercise legal power in both European and Native legal regimes? In other words, how and why did people from different cultures make their understandings of law intelligible to one another in violent contests over land, property, and freedom? Finally, how did these plural legal orders change over time? In this seminar, we will explore these questions to uncover the nature of legal pluralism and the ways it shaped the multiple meanings of law, justice, sovereignty, empire, and slavery in early North America. Drawing on a mix of primary and secondary sources, we will discuss competing ideologies and jurisdictional disputes in the constitution of law. We will also examine conceptual approaches to analyze how legal pluralism defined relations between Native peoples, African Americans, and settlers in early North America. Ultimately, we will consider how the legal complexity of the early modern era informs our understanding of the meanings of law and justice in the present day.
            Instructors: 
            GALLMAN, NANCY
            Day and Time: 
            R 0300PM-0600PM
            Room: 

            COLLEGE HALL 311F

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST231 - TOPICS IN US HISTORY: EARLY AMERICAN STUDIES

              Description: 
              Nowadays many Early Americanists have turned to cultural history. There have been different reasons for such a shift, which is built on solid empirical foundations laid by demographers and social historians beginning in the early 1960s. One contributing element was surely the history of early American religion, always interested in what sermons and doctrinal reform meant for clergy and laity alike. Another element came from cultural anthropology, with its interest in specific communities and the textual webs of symbolic meaning that tied families to families, and individuals to one another. American art and material culture offered its concern with social aesthetics and questions of exchange value. Still another set of connections came as the walls between early American literature and early American history--disciplinary fences, as it were-- started to crumble. But no matter the perspective taken, these approaches intersect in reconstructing the systems of meaning that held colonial societies together and, on occasion, signaled their transformation. This semester we will be examining key moments in the emergence of the field, works that explore interdisciplinary methods and theoretical approaches as well as offering new models for historical narrative itself. And while most of our readings and discussion will explore changes in early American culture between 1600 and 1785-- or roughly from the period of imperial exploration and initial settlement to the Revolutionary settlement, and native reactions to settlement colonialism-- some aspects of early national and antebellum culture will fall within consideration.
              Instructors: 
              ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
              Day and Time: 
              R 0130PM-0430PM
              Room: 

              COLLEGE HALL 311A

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP

                Description: 
                This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."
                Instructors: 
                FEROS, ANTONIO
                Day and Time: 
                MW 1000AM-1100AM
                Room: 

                ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111

                Activity: 
                LEC
                Cross Listings: 
                  Registration Notes: 
                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

                  HIST139 - JEWS & JUDAISM IN ANTQTY

                  Description: 
                  A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings to the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
                  Instructors: 
                  DOHRMANN, NATALIE
                  Day and Time: 
                  TR 0300PM-0430PM
                  Room: 

                  MCNEIL BUILDING 309

                  Activity: 
                  LEC
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
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