pre-1800

HIST411 - THE MEDITERRANEAN AND THE WORLD, 1450-1700

Description: 
Using as our guides the works of Miguel de Cervantes, Michael de Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Baldassare Castiglione, Antonio de Sosa, Elias al-Musili, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Aḥmad ibn Qāsim Ibn al-Ḥajarī, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, and many others, this seminar will analyze the social mutations, religious confrontations, political conflicts, cultural productions and circulation of books and ideas that characterized the Mediterranean world during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Based on a close reading of the authors mentioned above, this seminar will focus on the study of the central transformations – political, religious, cultural, and literary – in the early modern Mediterranean world. Students will also be introduced to original materials belonging to the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collections of the Library: early modern editions of some of the books read in the class, printed ephemera, or manuscript documents belonging to the Lea Collection. Students are expected to be active participants in this class; class attendance, participation, and oral presentations will be required. Students will write a final paper, around 15 pages. Students majoring in History can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.
Instructors: 
FEROS, ANTONIO
CHARTIER, ROGER
POLLACK, JOHN
Day and Time: 
M 0200PM-0500PM
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 

    HIST276 - JAPAN:AGE OF THE SAMURAI

    Instructors: 
    SPAFFORD, DAVID
    Day and Time: 
    MW 0330PM-0500PM
    Room: 
    WILLIAMS HALL 202
    Activity: 
    LEC
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

      HIST306 - GUNPOWDER, ART, & DIPLOMACY: ISLAMIC EMPIRES IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

      Description: 
      In the sixteenth century, the political landscape of the Middle East, Central Asia, and India changed with the expansion and consolidation of new Islamic empires. Gunpowder had transformed the modes of warfare. Diplomacy followed new rules and forms of legitimation. The widespread use of Persian, Arabic and Turkish languages across the region allowed for an interconnected world of scholars, merchants, and diplomats. And each imperial court, those of the Ottomans, the Safavids, and the Mughals, found innovative and original forms of expression in art and literature. The expansion of these Islamic empires, each of them military giants and behemoths of bureaucracy, marked a new phase in world history.
      Instructors: 
      AGUIRRE MANDUJANO, OSCAR
      Day and Time: 
      MW 0330PM-0500PM
      Activity: 
      LEC
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

        HIST308 - RENAISSANCE EUROPE

        Description: 
        This course will examine the cultural and intellectual movement known as the Renaissance, from its origins in fourteenth-century Italy to its diffusion into the rest of Europe in the sixteenth century. We will trace the great changes in the world of learning and letters, the visual arts, and music,along with those taking place in politics, economics, and social organization. We will be reading primary sources as well as modern works.
        Instructors: 
        MOYER, ANN
        Day and Time: 
        TR 1030AM-1200PM
        Activity: 
        LEC
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST312 - BRITAIN'S CENTURY OF REV

          Description: 
          England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland experienced revolutions in the first half of the seventeenth century that abolished monarchy and hereditary aristocracy, and carried out the first judicial execution of a monarch in European history. England was re-constructed as a republic, then with Scotland became the United Commonwealth of Great Britain, then declined into a military dictatorship, and finally invited the king back. In 1688, however, the Glorious Revolution deposed that king and declared Britain a strictly constitutional monarchy. This course will explore what motivated ordinarily obedient British subjects to take up arms against their rulers. The works of Milton and Marvell, Cromwell, Hobbes and Locke, and many lesser-known writers of diaries, autobiographies, sermons, statutes, and letters will illuminate the issues. The focus will be on how law, politics and religion interacted in the onset of war and defining of settlement, but with an eye to the larger social and cultural setting in which revolutions happened: this is also an era of both witchcraze and scientific revolution, puritanism and the slave trade, the near-destruction of London by fire and plague and its re-birth as the capital of a commercial empire.
          Instructors: 
          TODD, MARGO
          Day and Time: 
          TR 0300PM-0430PM
          Activity: 
          LEC
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST313 - THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND THE ORIGINS OF MODERN POLITICS

            Description: 
            This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and especially political history of France and its Empire from the end of the Old Regime through the Napoleonic period. The origins, development, and outcome of the French Revolution, followed by the Haitian Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, will be our main focus. Particular attention will be paid to the global legacy of these late 18th and early 19th century revolutions in terms of such key modern political concepts as human rights, nationalism, social welfare, feminism, democracy, terrorism, abolitionism, capitalism, and revolution itself. Throughout the course, we will also emphasize the different and often conflicting ways in which historians have interpreted the meaning and consequences of this critical moment of upheaval. Readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine lecture and discussion. Requirements will be one mid-term examination (15%), one short paper (15%), one final paper (30%), and one final examination (30%), as well as class participation (10%).
            Instructors: 
            ROSENFELD, SOPHIA
            Day and Time: 
            TR 1030AM-1200PM
            Activity: 
            LEC
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST233 - CORRUPTION, COLLUSION, AND COMMMERCE IN EARLY AMERICA AND THE CARRIBEAN

              Description: 
              Corruption in politics and economics has become a significant issue in the modern world. This course introduces students to the study of corruption and collusion from the perspective of early America and the Caribbean from 1500 through 1820. By examining the historical evolution of corruption, the course addresses questions such as: What is corruption and, by contrast, what is good governance? Who creates law and when is it enforced? Can societies be corrupt or only institutions? And, does economic corruption help or hurt financial development? Our readings and discussion will examine the intersection of politics, culture, gender, and economics. We will reflect on how early Americans understood corruption and collusion and what that can tell us about similar modern issues. In the end, the course focuses on the concept of corruption as a complex social function through the lens of bribery, piracy, sex crimes, and other forms of social deviancy.
              Instructors: 
              SCHMITT, CASEY
              Day and Time: 
              M 0330PM-0630PM
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST234 - THE HORSE IN WORLD HIST

                Description: 
                Around 8000 years ago, communities in the western part of the Eurasian steppe began to breed and ride horses. This process of domestication made horses central participants in human history. The domestication of the horse transformed military tactics, human mobility and communication, agriculture, and entertainment. Humans have transformed the horse as well, producing about 200 breeds with unique characteristics matched to human goals. This course traces the history of equine-human relations across the globe, using the horse as a focal point to think about animal-human relations in societies ranging from prehistoric Europe to the Spanish conquests of Latin America. Our inquiry will address not only the place of horses in these particular phases of world history, but also by extension the debates about human-animal relations in our society today. The Major or Minor geographic requirement fulfilled by this course will be determined by an individual student’s research paper topic
                Instructors: 

                AGUIRRE MANDUJANO, OSCAR

                Day and Time: 

                T 0130PM-0430PM

                Activity: 
                SEM

                HIST234 - The Catholic World, Medieval to Modern

                Description: 
                Rebuild my Church – this was the divine message that Francis of Assisi believed he heard at the dawn of the thirteenth century. It became the basis of his mission to reform Catholicism and, over 800 years later, his reformation was embraced symbolically when Jorge Bergoglio assumed the name of Pope Francis I. What exactly was the species of Catholicism that they encountered and in what new directions did they lead it? Just after the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Reformation was celebrated around the world last year, this moment is a singular opportunity to study the longer term evolutions and reformations in the history of Catholicism in which the Protestant reformations are situated. This course introduces students to the global history of Catholicism over the last millennium. It will trace the development of this religion as an institution and set of doctrines interacting with concrete historical circumstances. It also will investigate what it was like to live Catholicism in different eras and different places, moving across Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa between the High Middle Ages and the modern globalized world. No prior knowledge is required. Students will evaluate our knowledge about this subject through close examination of primary texts, material artifacts, audio-visual sources, and modern historical scholarship, posting regular discussion questions for the benefit of the seminar. The course will feature a midterm exam and a final essay of 8-12 pages (or final exam in lieu of a final essay). This course may be taken to fulfill the following requirements for Penn History Majors and Minors: Pre-1800, SEM, and one of the following geographic areas, depending on the topic of the student's research paper: Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, U.S.
                Instructors: 
                CHEELY, DANIEL
                Day and Time: 
                M 0600PM-0900PM
                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST251 - MARRIAGE AND THE NOVEL

                  Instructors: 
                  DEJEAN, JOAN
                  Day and Time: 
                  M 0200PM-0500PM
                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS
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