Research

Fulfills Research Requirement

HIST273 - PENN SLAVERY PROJECT RES

Instructors: 
BROWN, KATHLEEN
NEUMANN, ALEXIS
Day and Time: 

F 0900AM-1200PM

Room: 

MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105

Activity: 
FLD
Cross Listings: 

    HIST411 - THE MEDITERRANEAN AND THE WORLD, 1450-1700

    Description: 
    Using as our guides the works of Miguel de Cervantes, Michael de Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Baldassare Castiglione, Antonio de Sosa, Elias al-Musili, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Aḥmad ibn Qāsim Ibn al-Ḥajarī, Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, and many others, this seminar will analyze the social mutations, religious confrontations, political conflicts, cultural productions and circulation of books and ideas that characterized the Mediterranean world during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Based on a close reading of the authors mentioned above, this seminar will focus on the study of the central transformations – political, religious, cultural, and literary – in the early modern Mediterranean world. Students will also be introduced to original materials belonging to the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collections of the Library: early modern editions of some of the books read in the class, printed ephemera, or manuscript documents belonging to the Lea Collection. Students are expected to be active participants in this class; class attendance, participation, and oral presentations will be required. Students will write a final paper, around 15 pages. Students majoring in History can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.
    Instructors: 
    FEROS, ANTONIO
    CHARTIER, ROGER
    POLLACK, JOHN
    Day and Time: 
    M 0200PM-0500PM
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 

      HIST231 - WARTIME INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE AMERICANS

      Description: 
      This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
      Instructors: 
      AZUMA, EIICHIRO
      Day and Time: 
      T 0130PM-0430PM
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST232 - MIGRATION AND REFUGEES IN AFRICAN HISTORY

        Description: 
        This seminar will examine the experiences of recent African emigrants and refugees within and from the continent Africa from a historical and comparative perspective. We will look at the relations of overseas Africans with both their home and host societies, drawing on some of the extensive comparative literature on immigration, ethnic diasporas, and transnationalism. Other topics include reasons for leaving Africa, patterns of economic and educational adaptation abroad, changes in gender and generational roles, issues of cultural, religious, and political identity, and the impact of international immigration policies. Students will have the opportunity to conduct focused research on specific African communities in Philadelphia or elsewhere in North America, Europe, or the Middle East. We will employ a variety of sources and methodologies from different disciplines--including newspapers, government and NGOs, literature and film, and diaspora internet sites--to explore the lives, aspirations, and perceptions of Africans abroad. History Majors may complete the research requirement if their paper is based on primary sources. Students not seeking credit for the research requirement may write papers drawing on secondary sources exclusively. Class meets Mondays from 2:00-5:00 and will consist of a combination of lectures (including several by invited guests), discussions, video screenings, and presentations by students of their research in progress.
        Instructors: 
        BABOU, CHEIKH
        Day and Time: 
        M 0200PM-0500PM
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST233 - TAKING OFF: HOW SOME ECONOMIES GET RICH

          Description: 
          What makes an economy grow? This question has been asked – and answered – many times over in the modern era. From Adam Smith’s classic Wealth of Nations (1776) to today’s political leaders, many have debated the ingredients necessary for a nation to prosper, or policies to promote growth. Some point to the need for fiscal responsibility, others an educated labor force, or to tariffs, natural resources, and the right laws. This seminar explores the deep history of this problem of economic growth. Students will read works by economists, social scientists, and historians that present different theories for why some nations develop faster than others. With case studies from across the globe, we will tackle topics like why Europe industrialized first, or the paradox of why the abundance of natural resources does not necessarily contribute to long-lasting economic development. This course also asks students to think critically about the metrics used to measure “success” and “failure” across nations, as well as how such comparisons between societies have been mobilized to legitimize imperial expansion, human exploitation, environmental destruction, or political repression. By discussing how governments, corporate interests, and individual actors have implemented strategies to increase national wealth, students will also be asked to grapple with some of the consequences of economic growth for the environment, human welfare, and social inequality. *Students may fulfill one geographic requirement for the History major or minor with this course. The specific requirement fulfilled will be determined by the topic of the research paper.
          Instructors: 
          TEIXEIRA, MELISSA
          Day and Time: 
          W 0330PM-0630PM
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Syllabus: 

            HIST234 - THE HORSE IN WORLD HIST

            Description: 
            Around 8000 years ago, communities in the western part of the Eurasian steppe began to breed and ride horses. This process of domestication made horses central participants in human history. The domestication of the horse transformed military tactics, human mobility and communication, agriculture, and entertainment. Humans have transformed the horse as well, producing about 200 breeds with unique characteristics matched to human goals. This course traces the history of equine-human relations across the globe, using the horse as a focal point to think about animal-human relations in societies ranging from prehistoric Europe to the Spanish conquests of Latin America. Our inquiry will address not only the place of horses in these particular phases of world history, but also by extension the debates about human-animal relations in our society today. The Major or Minor geographic requirement fulfilled by this course will be determined by an individual student’s research paper topic
            Instructors: 
            AGUIRRE MANDUJANO, OSCAR
            Day and Time: 
            T 0130PM-0430PM
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST243 - THE AMERICAN WOMEN'S MOVEMENT AND LGBT LIBERATION, 1960S-1980S

              Description: 
              This seminar explores the history of the feminist and LGBT movements from the mid-1960s to mid-1980s in Philadelphia. Although there will be some attention to national organizations, we will focus on social and political activism as it was made in local groups and spaces. We will explore the social and cultural web that fostered activism, for example, in gay and lesbian coffee houses, campus women's centers, bookstores, and radio shows. We will also pay attention to groups and actions that may not have been self-consciously defined as "feminist" or "gay liberationist," but had important effects on social change related to gender and sexuality; these include African American, Latino/a, and working-class organizations. This is a hands-on research seminar, with students exploring local archives and special collections to document and analyze these complex movements. Each student will conduct an oral history, analyze a set of published and printed sources, and write a paper based on archival research.
              Instructors: 
              PEISS, KATHY
              Day and Time: 
              T 0130PM-0430PM
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST273 - PENN SLAVERY PROJECT RES

                Description: 
                This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge into doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will b opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project.
                Instructors: 
                BROWN, KATHLEEN
                NEUMANN, ALEXIS
                Day and Time: 
                F 0800AM-1100AM
                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST202 - MODERN SPAIN FROM CIVIL WAR TO DEMOCRACY, 1930-1977

                  Description: 
                  This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political history of Spain from the 1890s loss of the colonial empire through the end of the Francoist regime (1970s). The history of 20th-century Spain offers the opportunity to study events, processes and ideologies that were and are central to the history of the West in the modern period: imperialism, the rise of communism and fascism, civil war, dictatorship, post-war reconstruction, and wars over cultural memory to control how societies remember their pasts. This course is divided into four parts. Introduction: the loss of the last colonies (1898) and the effect in Spain, and on Spain’s participation in the scramble for Africa. First Part: the Spanish Republic and Civil War (1931-1939), focuses on the rise of a democratic system and its demise after three years of violent civil war. Second Part: Post-war Reconstruction (1939-1975), focuses on the reconstruction of Spain led by an authoritarian and anti-democratic dictator, General Franco, the winner of the Civil War. Third Part: Memory Wars, focuses on the period after 1975 with the restoration of a democratic system. In this section, we will study the different and often conflicting ways Spaniards remembered the origins and causes of the Civil War, the victims of the Civil War, and the characteristics of Franco’s regime. Course readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine short lectures by the instructor and discussion. Requirements: weekly short papers (reactions to weekly readings), oral presentations, and a final paper of 15 pages. Students can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.
                  Instructors: 
                  FEROS, ANTONIO
                  Day and Time: 
                  MW 1230PM-0200PM
                  Room: 

                  VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 

                    HIST400 - SENIOR HONORS

                    Instructors: 
                    TODD, MARGO
                    Day and Time: 
                    M 0200PM-0500PM
                    Room: 
                    MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                      Syndicate content