Research

Fulfills Research Requirement

HIST202 - MODERN SPAIN FROM CIVIL WAR TO DEMOCRACY, 1930-1977

Description: 
This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political history of Spain from the 1890s loss of the colonial empire through the end of the Francoist regime (1970s). The history of 20th-century Spain offers the opportunity to study events, processes and ideologies that were and are central to the history of the West in the modern period: imperialism, the rise of communism and fascism, civil war, dictatorship, post-war reconstruction, and wars over cultural memory to control how societies remember their pasts. This course is divided into four parts. Introduction: the loss of the last colonies (1898) and the effect in Spain, and on Spain’s participation in the scramble for Africa. First Part: the Spanish Republic and Civil War (1931-1939), focuses on the rise of a democratic system and its demise after three years of violent civil war. Second Part: Post-war Reconstruction (1939-1975), focuses on the reconstruction of Spain led by an authoritarian and anti-democratic dictator, General Franco, the winner of the Civil War. Third Part: Memory Wars, focuses on the period after 1975 with the restoration of a democratic system. In this section, we will study the different and often conflicting ways Spaniards remembered the origins and causes of the Civil War, the victims of the Civil War, and the characteristics of Franco’s regime. Course readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine short lectures by the instructor and discussion. Requirements: weekly short papers (reactions to weekly readings), oral presentations, and a final paper of 15 pages. Students can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.
Instructors: 
FEROS, ANTONIO
Day and Time: 
MW 1230PM-0200PM
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 

    HIST400 - SENIOR HONORS

    Instructors: 
    TODD, MARGO
    Day and Time: 
    M 0200PM-0500PM
    Room: 
    COLLEGE HALL 315A
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT

      HIST412 - CHINESE FOREIGN POLICY

      Description: 
      An examination of China’s policies since 1950 not so much in general terms, but rather by looking at policies toward specific countries, such as Korea 1950-53, Taiwan 1958, India 1962, Japan 1963, USSR 1969, US recognition 1971-79 and failure of Kissinger policies. Vietnam both wars: i.e. we cover the ongoing conflict that began in 1979 as well as the war that ended in 1975, toward Cambodia, and not least the South China Sea and the whole world today. We will also examine China’s immense military build up (for what purpose?) the concept that China is rising, the US declining, and Beijing is foreordained lord of the East. The goal is to start from empirical information then build some sense of whether policy has continuity, common features etc. or not, and to what extent it is domestically driven or not. Lots of political background but little theory or grand generalization. A serious research paper will be required.
      Instructors: 
      WALDRON, ARTHUR
      Day and Time: 
      T 0130PM-0430PM
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST231 - PATRIOTS, PARTIES AND PROGRESSIVES: THE U.S. 1776-1906

        Description: 
        This course examines the history of the “long” nineteenth century in the United States. We will begin with the formation of the republic in the aftermath of the American Revolution and end in the Progressive Era. Particular emphasis will be placed on political and social history. Topics include: the formation and destruction of political party systems, reform movements, religious revivalism and identity, Indian removal, continental expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, labor movements, immigration, and transformations in transportation, communication, and consumption.
        Instructors: 
        GRONNINGSATER, SARAH
        Day and Time: 
        R 0130PM-0430PM
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST231 - LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE

          Description: 
          This is a course in the history of law and social change. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will focus on the role law, lawyers, judges, other public officials and policy advocates and social movements and networks have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will focus on evaluating the importance or lack thereof of historical perspective and legal expertise in making social change. Assigned readings will be discussed in class. Each student will submit a paper based on primary and secondary material on a topic of her choosing within the overall subject matter of the course. Paper drafts will be discussed in class. The Final Paper is due at the beginning of the final examination period.
          Instructors: 
          BERRY, MARY
          Day and Time: 
          T 0130PM-0430PM
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST234 - ABOLITIONISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY

            Description: 
            This class develops a transnational and global approach to the rise of abolitionism in the nineteenth century. In a comparative framework, the class traces the rise of abolitionism in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia, examining the suppression of the transatlantic slave trade, the rise of colonialism in Africa, and the growth of forced labor in the wake of transatlantic slave trade. We will deal with key debates in the literature of African, Atlantic and Global histories, including the causes and motivations of abolitionism, the relationship between the suppression of the slave trade and the growth of forced labor in Africa, the historical ties between abolitionism and the early stages of colonialism in Africa, the flow of indentured laborers from Asia to the Americas in the wake of the slave trade. This class is primarily geared towards the production of a research paper. *Depending on the research paper topic, History Majors and Minors can use this course to fulfill the US, Europe, Latin America or Africa requirement.*
            Day and Time: 
            M 0200PM-0500PM
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST241 - PERFORMING HISTORY

              Description: 
              This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view.
              Instructors: 
              ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
              Day and Time: 
              R 0130PM-0430PM
              Room: 

              COLLEGE HALL 311A

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST212 - GREAT WAR IN MEMOIR AND MEMORY

                Description: 
                World War One was the primordial catastrophe of twentieth-century history. For all who passed through it, the Great War was transformative, presenting a profound rupture in personal experience. It was a war that unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of memoirs and poetic and fictional accounts written by participants. In its wake, it also produced new forms of public commemoration and memorialization – tombs to the unknown soldier, great monuments, soldiers’ cemeteries, solemn days of remembrance, and the like. On the centenary of World War One’s outbreak, this course will explore the war through the intersection of these processes of personal and public memory. The first ten weeks will be devoted to shared readings on these themes. In the remaining weeks, students will pursue independent research projects investigating the literature of the Great War or aspects of public or private commemoration. Please note: This is not a seminar in military or diplomatic history, but rather an exploration of personal experiences of the War, representations of experience, and the cultural and political dimensions of memory.
                Instructors: 
                BRECKMAN, WARREN
                Day and Time: 
                W 0200PM-0500PM
                Room: 

                VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 
                  Registration Notes: 
                  BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

                  HIST216 - RELIGION & COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA

                  Description: 
                  This course is designed to introduce students to the religious experiences of Africans and to the politics of culture. We will examine how traditional African religious ideas and practices interacted with Christianity and Islam. We will look specifically at religious expressions among the Yoruba, Southern African independent churches and millenarist movements, and the variety of Muslim organizations that developed during the colonial era. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, to develop in students an awareness of the wide range of meanings of conversion and people's motives in creating and adhering to religious institutions; Second, to examine the political, cultural, and psychological dimensions in the expansion of religious social movements; And third, to investigate the role of religion as counterculture and instrument of resistance to European hegemony. Topics include: Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements in Kenya and Tanzania, Chimurenga in Mozambique, Watchtower churches in Southern Africa, anti-colonial Jihads in Sudan and Somalia and mystical Muslim orders in Senegal.
                  Instructors: 
                  BABOU, CHEIKH
                  Day and Time: 
                  R 0130PM-0430PM
                  Room: 
                  COLLEGE HALL 217
                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

                    HIST216 - JEWS AND THE CITY

                    Description: 
                    Jews have always been an extraordinarily urban people. This seminar explores various aspects of the Jewish encounter with the city, examining the ways that Jewish culture has been shaped by and has helped to shape urban culture. We will examine European and American cities as well as some in Palestine/Israel, covering an expansive view of urban culture. We will consider Jewish involvement in political and cultural life, the various neighborhoods in which Jews have lived, relations with other ethnic groups, as well as many other topics. We will read some classic works in the field along with contemporary scholarship. No prior background in Jewish history is required. *This course may be applied toward the US, European, or Middle East requirements for the History Major or Minor, depending upon the research paper topic. Students must consult with the instructor to determine which geographic requirement will be fulfilled.*
                    Instructors: 
                    WENGER, BETH
                    Day and Time: 
                    R 0130PM-0430PM
                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS
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