Seminar

HIST370 - N.AFRICA:HIST,CULTR,SOC

Description: 
This interdisciplinary seminar examines the colonial and postcolonial experiences of North Africa in the context of the region’s close connections to Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. Readings will cover Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya as well as their relationships to the history of French, Italian and Spanish colonialism. While the period of sustained European imperial control over North Africa began as early as 1830 in Algeria and as late as 1911-12 in Libya and Morocco, decolonization was almost complete in the region by the early 1960s. Throughout the semester, we will test the thesis that this “colonial moment” had far-reaching implications not only for postcolonial North African societies, but also for the European countries that imposed colonial rule. We will also explore the interconnectedness of economic, political, and cultural phenomena in North African history, e.g., the implications of labor migration for musical culture, and the interplay of religion and language in the construction of national identities. Finally, we will consider the ways in which portrayals of history and culture have been politically charged and hotly contested in both colonial and postcolonial contexts. Note: This seminar is intended for students who already have a background in modern Middle Eastern or African history.
Instructors: 
SHARKEY, HEATHER
Day and Time: 
T 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 

WILLIAMS HALL 219

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

    HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

    Instructors: 
    TODD, MARGO
    Day and Time: 
    M 0200PM-0500PM
    Room: 
    MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
      • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

      HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

      Instructors: 
      NATHANS, BENJAMIN
      Day and Time: 
      CANCELED
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
        • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

        HIST411 - INTRO TO PRINT CULTURE

        Instructors: 
        STALLYBRASS, PETER
        CHARTIER, ROGER
        Day and Time: 
        M 0200PM-0500PM
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO

          HIST414 - HUMAN RIGHTS AND HISTORY

          Description: 
          The idea of universal, inalienable rights--once dismissed by the philosopher Jeremy Bentham as "nonsense upon stilts"--has become the dominant moral language of our time, the self-evident truth par excellence of our age. Human rights have become a source of inspiration to oppressed individuals and groups across the world, the rallying cry for a global civil society, and not least, a controversial source of legitimation for American foreign policy. This seminar asks: how did all this come to be? We will investigate human rights not only as theories embodied in texts, but as practices embedded in specific historical contexts. Are human rights the product of a peculiarly European heritage, of the Enlightenment and protestantism? How did Americans reconcile inalienable rights with the reality of slavery? Did human rights serve as a "civilizing" mask for colonialism? Can universal rights be reconciled with genuine cultural diversity? Through case studies and close readings, the seminar will work toward a genealogy of human rights.
          Instructors: 
          NATHANS, BENJAMIN
          Day and Time: 
          R 0130PM-0430PM
          Room: 

          COLLEGE HALL 315A

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Syllabus: 

            HIST418 - EURO INTELLCT SINCE 1945

            Description: 
            This course concentrates on French intellectual history after 1945, with some excursions into Germany. We will explore changing conceptions of the intellectual, from Sartre's concenpt of the 'engagement' to Foucault's idea of the 'specific intellectual'; the rise and fall of existentialism; structuralism and poststructuralism; and the debate over 'postmodernity.'
            Instructors: 
            BRECKMAN, WARREN
            Day and Time: 
            W 0200PM-0500PM
            Room: 

            COLLEGE HALL 315A

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Registration Notes: 
              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

              HIST231 - JAPANESE-AMERICAN INTERNMENT

              Description: 
              This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
              Instructors: 
              AZUMA, EIICHIRO
              Day and Time: 
              T 0130PM-0430PM
              Room: 
              COLLEGE HALL 217
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 
                Registration Notes: 
                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

                HIST232 - AFRICAN URBAN HISTORY

                Description: 
                African cities in the past contributed to dynamic and prosperous civilizations. African cities in the present demonstrate the failure of models of development and ideals of industrialization. What happened? This course examines Africans’ aspirations for modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film and current scholarship in several disciplines. Each class will explore two temporalities—the precolonial history of African cities, and the colonial and postcolonial histories of economic, social and political progress which goes by the name of development. Grounded in the case studies of both ancient and modern cities, this course explores the emergence and decline of trading centers, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and politics.
                Instructors: 
                DYER, ELIZABETH
                Day and Time: 
                R 0300PM-0600PM
                Room: 

                DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2C4

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 
                  Registration Notes: 
                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

                  HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS

                  Description: 
                  Students in this seminar will choose their own research topic in the history of feminism. With guidance and support each person will produce a twenty-page paper based on intensive work with primary sources. Our shared readings will focus on the sometimes overlapping and sometimes divergent feminist histories that can be traced in the writings and cultural products of people in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. We’ll take a long view, beginning in the sixteenth century, and use an expansive frame. Our purpose will not be to decide who was or wasn’t ‘a feminist’ but instead to try to understand the social life of ideas that included aspects of what more recent activists mean by the term, while also being attentive to the reasons why actions and concepts from past worlds can’t be imported very easily into our own.
                  Instructors: 
                  FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
                  Day and Time: 
                  M 0200PM-0500PM
                  Room: 
                  COLLEGE HALL 318
                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 

                    HIST234 - CAPITALISM AND HUMANITARIANISM

                    Description: 
                    Reviewing David Brion Davis’ Problem of Slavery in Western Culture for the New York Review of Books in 1967, the great ancient historian Moses Finley concluded that Davis’s book was “one of the most important to have been published on the subject of slavery in modern times.” Yet he found the book inconclusive on the “decisive question” of why slavery was finally abolished in the West. “Nothing is more difficult perhaps than to explain how and why, or why not, a new moral perception becomes effective in action,” Finley wrote. Almost 50 years after this statement was made, the complicated processes that are being played out at the heart of capitalism, mobilizing both ethical issues and the pursuit of profit are still imperfectly understood, yet more fascinating than ever. This course’s working hypothesis is that, from a better understanding of the entanglements of capitalism and humanitarianism a better understanding of the nature of the “material civilization” can be achieved. For this purpose, the course does provide a multi-pronged approach including sessions discussing analytical arguments about the reasons for the entanglements of capitalism and humanitarianism, sessions devoted to historical turning points and sessions devoted to case studies and the exploration of specific mechanisms whereby capitalism and humanitarianism connect with one another. I wish in particular to try and make students aware of the problem of “quality” and its social construction, which is found at the heart of both capitalism and humanitarianism. By awakening them to this question, I also hope to provide an engaging way to understand the importance of economics in cultural history. Last, while the course will make verbal references to work on more recent periods, the focus is on a time frame that ends with World War I. This seems warranted given that the purpose is to unpack the entanglements of finance and humanitarianism “as they got intertwined.” Nota Bene, some a few non-mandatory readings in French.
                    Instructors: 
                    FLANDREAU, MARC
                    Day and Time: 
                    R 0130PM-0430PM
                    Room: 
                    MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
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