Seminar

HIST231 - HIST BEHIND THE HEADLINES: COMTEMP US POLITICS&POLICY IN HIST PERSPECTIVE

Description: 
History Behind the Headlines offers students the opportunity to explore the historical roots and development of current, pressing questions of U.S. politics and public policy. Drawing upon historical methodologies and scholarship as well recent work in political science and sociology, this reading seminar offers deep context for understanding some of the most important contemporary issues in American public life. Topics will likely include political polarization, the incarceration crisis, immigration, lobbying (that is, the role of money in democracy), and, perhaps, impeachment. In addition to a number of short response and op-ed style writing assignments, students will write and present a final project on a contemporary political or policy issue of their choosing. These final projects might take a variety of forms, including traditional historical research essays, policy white papers, long form investigative journalism, or projects using digital media.
Instructors: 
CEBUL, RANDALL
Day and Time: 
R 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 315A

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 

    HIST231 - ASYLUM FOR MANKIND: U.S.REFUGEE HISTORY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

    Description: 
    This course examines the history of refugee resettlement in the United States. In 1776, before the United States was an independent nation, political thinker Thomas Paine heralded the country as an “asylum for mankind,” a place where any individual might find refuge from oppression. More recently, the US has adopted a decidedly less welcoming view on whether refugees and asylum seekers should be able to enter the country. Students in this course will examine how and why the United States has struggled to live up to its national mythology as a safe haven on the world stage in the past and in the present. Readings will explore how concepts of refuge in law, politics, culture, and moral philosophy have changed over time and place, and how those concepts shape refugee policy today. Our aim will be to better understand the role of the United States in a global system of refugee regulation in which governments have historically welcomed, excluded, and created refugees. Examples of topics covered include: the ancient Greek concept of asulia, where refugees sought shelter in sacred temples across the Mediterranean world; the use of churches as sanctuaries in Europe during the Middle Ages; Indigenous nations in North America giving refuge to runaway slaves; the rise of an international regime for refugee resettlement after World War II; and today’s global sanctuary cities movement.
    Instructors: 
    TAPARATA, EVAN
    Day and Time: 
    TR 1200PM-0130PM
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 

      HIST273 - PENN SLAVERY PROJECT RES

      Description: 
      This research seminar provides students with instruction in basic historical methods and an opportunity to conduct collaborative primary source research into the University of Pennsylvania's historic connections to slavery. After an initial orientation to archival research, students will plunge into doing actual research at the Kislak Center, the University Archives, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the American Philosophical Society, the Library Company, and various online sources. During the final month of the semester, students will begin drafting research reports and preparing for a public presentation of the work. During the semester, there will b opportunities to collaborate with a certified genealogist, a data management and website expert, a consultant on public programming, and a Penn graduate whose research has been integral to the Penn Slavery Project.
      Instructors: 
      BROWN, KATHLEEN
      NEUMANN, ALEXIS
      Day and Time: 
      F 0800AM-1100AM
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias

        Description: 
        This course engages scholarship on colonialism and empire in the context of Spanish settlement in North America, in the region stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, known as the Spanish borderlands. We will examine the exploration, colonization, and expansion by Spanish officials and settlers as well as their attempts to impose an imperial vision of race, religion, and law on the lives of Native peoples, African Americans, and other Europeans in East and West Florida, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Alta and Baja California. We will also compare European conquests (Spanish, French, and English) and various independence movements across North America (the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and Mexican Independence) to understand how and why these events succeeded or failed and their connections to the Spanish borderlands. We will conclude by considering the extent to which borderlands histories are essential to the study of early America as they reflect culturally dynamic experiences in areas that would later become part of the United States and its legacy of empire.
        Instructors: 
        GALLMAN, NANCY
        Day and Time: 
        R 0300PM-0600PM
        Room: 

        MEYERSON HALL B7

        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

          HIST202 - MODERN SPAIN FROM CIVIL WAR TO DEMOCRACY, 1930-1977

          Description: 
          This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political history of Spain from the 1890s loss of the colonial empire through the end of the Francoist regime (1970s). The history of 20th-century Spain offers the opportunity to study events, processes and ideologies that were and are central to the history of the West in the modern period: imperialism, the rise of communism and fascism, civil war, dictatorship, post-war reconstruction, and wars over cultural memory to control how societies remember their pasts. This course is divided into four parts. Introduction: the loss of the last colonies (1898) and the effect in Spain, and on Spain’s participation in the scramble for Africa. First Part: the Spanish Republic and Civil War (1931-1939), focuses on the rise of a democratic system and its demise after three years of violent civil war. Second Part: Post-war Reconstruction (1939-1975), focuses on the reconstruction of Spain led by an authoritarian and anti-democratic dictator, General Franco, the winner of the Civil War. Third Part: Memory Wars, focuses on the period after 1975 with the restoration of a democratic system. In this section, we will study the different and often conflicting ways Spaniards remembered the origins and causes of the Civil War, the victims of the Civil War, and the characteristics of Franco’s regime. Course readings will be a mixture of primary and secondary sources, and classes will combine short lectures by the instructor and discussion. Requirements: weekly short papers (reactions to weekly readings), oral presentations, and a final paper of 15 pages. Students can opt to write a research paper (20 pages) using original primary sources, to fulfill the department research requirement.
          Instructors: 
          FEROS, ANTONIO
          Day and Time: 
          MW 1230PM-0200PM
          Room: 

          VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST412 - CHINESE FOREIGN POLICY

            Description: 
            An examination of China’s policies since 1950 not so much in general terms, but rather by looking at policies toward specific countries, such as Korea 1950-53, Taiwan 1958, India 1962, Japan 1963, USSR 1969, US recognition 1971-79 and failure of Kissinger policies. Vietnam both wars: i.e. we cover the ongoing conflict that began in 1979 as well as the war that ended in 1975, toward Cambodia, and not least the South China Sea and the whole world today. We will also examine China’s immense military build up (for what purpose?) the concept that China is rising, the US declining, and Beijing is foreordained lord of the East. The goal is to start from empirical information then build some sense of whether policy has continuity, common features etc. or not, and to what extent it is domestically driven or not. Lots of political background but little theory or grand generalization. A serious research paper will be required.
            Instructors: 
            WALDRON, ARTHUR
            Day and Time: 
            T 0130PM-0430PM
            Room: 

            COLLEGE HALL 217

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST412 - People and Power in Modern Mexico

              Instructors: 
              LOMBERA, JUAN
              Day and Time: 
              TR 0530PM-0700PM
              Room: 

              JAFFE BUILDING 113

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 
                Registration Notes: 
                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

                HIST400 - SENIOR HONORS

                Instructors: 
                TODD, MARGO
                Day and Time: 
                M 0200PM-0500PM
                Room: 
                MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 
                  Registration Notes: 
                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT

                  HIST231 - PATRIOTS, PARTIES AND PROGRESSIVES: THE U.S. 1776-1906

                  Description: 
                  This course examines the history of the “long” nineteenth century in the United States. We will begin with the formation of the republic in the aftermath of the American Revolution and end in the Progressive Era. Particular emphasis will be placed on political and social history. Topics include: the formation and destruction of political party systems, reform movements, religious revivalism and identity, Indian removal, continental expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, labor movements, immigration, and transformations in transportation, communication, and consumption.
                  Instructors: 
                  GRONNINGSATER, SARAH
                  Day and Time: 
                  R 0130PM-0430PM
                  Room: 

                  MEYERSON HALL B5

                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 

                    HIST231 - LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE

                    Description: 
                    This is a course in the history of law and social change. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will focus on the role law, lawyers, judges, other public officials and policy advocates and social movements and networks have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will focus on evaluating the importance or lack thereof of historical perspective and legal expertise in making social change. Assigned readings will be discussed in class. Each student will submit a paper based on primary and secondary material on a topic of her choosing within the overall subject matter of the course. Paper drafts will be discussed in class. The Final Paper is due at the beginning of the final examination period.
                    Instructors: 
                    BERRY, MARY
                    Day and Time: 
                    T 0130PM-0430PM
                    Room: 

                    COLLEGE HALL 216E

                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
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