Seminar

HIST212 - GREAT WAR IN MEMOIR AND MEMORY

Description: 
World War One was the primordial catastrophe of twentieth-century history. For all who passed through it, the Great War was transformative, presenting a profound rupture in personal experience. It was a war that unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of memoirs and poetic and fictional accounts written by participants. In its wake, it also produced new forms of public commemoration and memorialization – tombs to the unknown soldier, great monuments, soldiers’ cemeteries, solemn days of remembrance, and the like. On the centenary of World War One’s outbreak, this course will explore the war through the intersection of these processes of personal and public memory. The first ten weeks will be devoted to shared readings on these themes. In the remaining weeks, students will pursue independent research projects investigating the literature of the Great War or aspects of public or private commemoration. Please note: This is not a seminar in military or diplomatic history, but rather an exploration of personal experiences of the War, representations of experience, and the cultural and political dimensions of memory.
Instructors: 
BRECKMAN, WARREN
Day and Time: 
W 0200PM-0500PM
Room: 

VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

    HIST216 - RELIGION & COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA

    Description: 
    This course is designed to introduce students to the religious experiences of Africans and to the politics of culture. We will examine how traditional African religious ideas and practices interacted with Christianity and Islam. We will look specifically at religious expressions among the Yoruba, Southern African independent churches and millenarist movements, and the variety of Muslim organizations that developed during the colonial era. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, to develop in students an awareness of the wide range of meanings of conversion and people's motives in creating and adhering to religious institutions; Second, to examine the political, cultural, and psychological dimensions in the expansion of religious social movements; And third, to investigate the role of religion as counterculture and instrument of resistance to European hegemony. Topics include: Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements in Kenya and Tanzania, Chimurenga in Mozambique, Watchtower churches in Southern Africa, anti-colonial Jihads in Sudan and Somalia and mystical Muslim orders in Senegal.
    Instructors: 
    BABOU, CHEIKH
    Day and Time: 
    R 0130PM-0430PM
    Room: 
    VAN PELT LIBRARY 305
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

      HIST216 - JEWS AND THE CITY

      Description: 
      Jews have always been an extraordinarily urban people. This seminar explores various aspects of the Jewish encounter with the city, examining the ways that Jewish culture has been shaped by and has helped to shape urban culture. We will examine European and American cities as well as some in Palestine/Israel, covering an expansive view of urban culture. We will consider Jewish involvement in political and cultural life, the various neighborhoods in which Jews have lived, relations with other ethnic groups, as well as many other topics. We will read some classic works in the field along with contemporary scholarship. No prior background in Jewish history is required. *This course may be applied toward the US, European, or Middle East requirements for the History Major or Minor, depending upon the research paper topic. Students must consult with the instructor to determine which geographic requirement will be fulfilled.*
      Instructors: 
      WENGER, BETH
      Day and Time: 
      R 0130PM-0430PM
      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 315A

      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

        HIST230 - FLORENCE IN HISTORY

        Description: 
        Florence is justly famous for its art and learning, especially during the era of the Renaissance. It was also one of the most literate states in Europe during this era; thanks to the city’s 3 abundant records, it is one of the best-studied cities in Europe from the later Middle Ages through the early modern era. Our course readings present a mix of major primary sources, synthetic summaries, and important modern scholarship. Most of our class time will focus on the information and issues they raise.
        Instructors: 
        MOYER, ANN
        Day and Time: 
        T 0130PM-0430PM
        Room: 
        COLLEGE HALL 315A
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST370 - N.AFRICA:HIST,CULTR,SOC

          Description: 
          This interdisciplinary seminar examines the colonial and postcolonial experiences of North Africa in the context of the region’s close connections to Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. Readings will cover Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya as well as their relationships to the history of French, Italian and Spanish colonialism. While the period of sustained European imperial control over North Africa began as early as 1830 in Algeria and as late as 1911-12 in Libya and Morocco, decolonization was almost complete in the region by the early 1960s. Throughout the semester, we will test the thesis that this “colonial moment” had far-reaching implications not only for postcolonial North African societies, but also for the European countries that imposed colonial rule. We will also explore the interconnectedness of economic, political, and cultural phenomena in North African history, e.g., the implications of labor migration for musical culture, and the interplay of religion and language in the construction of national identities. Finally, we will consider the ways in which portrayals of history and culture have been politically charged and hotly contested in both colonial and postcolonial contexts. Note: This seminar is intended for students who already have a background in modern Middle Eastern or African history.
          Instructors: 
          SHARKEY, HEATHER
          Day and Time: 
          T 0130PM-0430PM
          Room: 

          WILLIAMS HALL 219

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Registration Notes: 
            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

            HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

            Instructors: 
            TODD, MARGO
            Day and Time: 
            M 0200PM-0500PM
            Room: 
            MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Registration Notes: 
              MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
              • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

              HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

              Instructors: 
              NATHANS, BENJAMIN
              Day and Time: 
              CANCELED
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 
                Registration Notes: 
                MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

                HIST411 - INTRO TO PRINT CULTURE

                Instructors: 
                STALLYBRASS, PETER
                CHARTIER, ROGER
                Day and Time: 
                M 0200PM-0500PM
                Room: 

                VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST414 - HUMAN RIGHTS AND HISTORY

                  Description: 
                  The idea of universal, inalienable rights--once dismissed by the philosopher Jeremy Bentham as "nonsense upon stilts"--has become the dominant moral language of our time, the self-evident truth par excellence of our age. Human rights have become a source of inspiration to oppressed individuals and groups across the world, the rallying cry for a global civil society, and not least, a controversial source of legitimation for American foreign policy. This seminar asks: how did all this come to be? We will investigate human rights not only as theories embodied in texts, but as practices embedded in specific historical contexts. Are human rights the product of a peculiarly European heritage, of the Enlightenment and protestantism? How did Americans reconcile inalienable rights with the reality of slavery? Did human rights serve as a "civilizing" mask for colonialism? Can universal rights be reconciled with genuine cultural diversity? Through case studies and close readings, the seminar will work toward a genealogy of human rights.
                  Instructors: 
                  NATHANS, BENJAMIN
                  Day and Time: 
                  R 0130PM-0430PM
                  Room: 

                  VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Syllabus: 

                    HIST418 - EURO INTELLCT SINCE 1945

                    Description: 
                    This course concentrates on French intellectual history after 1945, with some excursions into Germany. We will explore changing conceptions of the intellectual, from Sartre's concenpt of the 'engagement' to Foucault's idea of the 'specific intellectual'; the rise and fall of existentialism; structuralism and poststructuralism; and the debate over 'postmodernity.'
                    Instructors: 
                    BRECKMAN, WARREN
                    Day and Time: 
                    W 0200PM-0500PM
                    Room: 

                    COLLEGE HALL 315A

                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                      Syndicate content