Seminar

HIST216 - JEWS AND THE CITY

Description: 
Jews have always been an extraordinarily urban people. This seminar explores various aspects of the Jewish encounter with the city, examining the ways that Jewish culture has been shaped by and has helped to shape urban culture. We will examine European and American cities as well as some in Palestine/Israel, covering an expansive view of urban culture. We will consider Jewish involvement in political and cultural life, the various neighborhoods in which Jews have lived, relations with other ethnic groups, as well as many other topics. We will read some classic works in the field along with contemporary scholarship. No prior background in Jewish history is required. *This course may be applied toward the US, European, or Middle East requirements for the History Major or Minor, depending upon the research paper topic. Students must consult with the instructor to determine which geographic requirement will be fulfilled.*
Instructors: 
WENGER, BETH
Day and Time: 
R 0130PM-0430PM
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

    HIST230 - FLORENCE IN HISTORY

    Description: 
    Florence is justly famous for its art and learning, especially during the era of the Renaissance. It was also one of the most literate states in Europe during this era; thanks to the city’s 3 abundant records, it is one of the best-studied cities in Europe from the later Middle Ages through the early modern era. Our course readings present a mix of major primary sources, synthetic summaries, and important modern scholarship. Most of our class time will focus on the information and issues they raise.
    Instructors: 
    MOYER, ANN
    Day and Time: 
    T 0130PM-0430PM
    Room: 
    COLLEGE HALL 217
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 

      HIST231 - HISTORY OF BASEBALL, 1840-PRESENT

      Description: 
      This is course explores the history of baseball in the United States. It covers, among other topics, the first amateur clubs in the urban North, the professionalization and nationalization of the sport during and after the Civil War era, the rise of fandom, baseball’s relationship to anxieties about manhood and democracy, tensions between labor and management, the Negro Leagues, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, Nisei baseball during World War Two, Jackie Robinson and desegregation, and the Latinization of baseball. The history of baseball is, in many respects, the history of the United States writ large as well as the history of the myths that Americans tell about themselves.
      Instructors: 
      GRONNINGSATER, SARAH
      Day and Time: 
      W 0200PM-0500PM
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 

        HIST370 - N.AFRICA:HIST,CULTR,SOC

        Description: 
        This interdisciplinary seminar examines the colonial and postcolonial experiences of North Africa in the context of the region’s close connections to Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. Readings will cover Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya as well as their relationships to the history of French, Italian and Spanish colonialism. While the period of sustained European imperial control over North Africa began as early as 1830 in Algeria and as late as 1911-12 in Libya and Morocco, decolonization was almost complete in the region by the early 1960s. Throughout the semester, we will test the thesis that this “colonial moment” had far-reaching implications not only for postcolonial North African societies, but also for the European countries that imposed colonial rule. We will also explore the interconnectedness of economic, political, and cultural phenomena in North African history, e.g., the implications of labor migration for musical culture, and the interplay of religion and language in the construction of national identities. Finally, we will consider the ways in which portrayals of history and culture have been politically charged and hotly contested in both colonial and postcolonial contexts. Note: This seminar is intended for students who already have a background in modern Middle Eastern or African history.
        Instructors: 
        SHARKEY, HEATHER
        Day and Time: 
        T 0130PM-0430PM
        Room: 

        WILLIAMS HALL 219

        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

          HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

          Instructors: 
          TODD, MARGO
          Day and Time: 
          M 0200PM-0500PM
          Room: 
          MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Registration Notes: 
            MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
            • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

            HIST398 - JUNIOR HONORS IN HISTORY

            Instructors: 
            NATHANS, BENJAMIN
            Day and Time: 
            CANCELED
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Registration Notes: 
              MAJORS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
              • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: Seminar

              HIST411 - INTRO TO PRINT CULTURE

              Instructors: 
              STALLYBRASS, PETER
              CHARTIER, ROGER
              Day and Time: 
              M 0200PM-0500PM
              Room: 

              VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST414 - HUMAN RIGHTS AND HISTORY

                Description: 
                The idea of universal, inalienable rights--once dismissed by the philosopher Jeremy Bentham as "nonsense upon stilts"--has become the dominant moral language of our time, the self-evident truth par excellence of our age. Human rights have become a source of inspiration to oppressed individuals and groups across the world, the rallying cry for a global civil society, and not least, a controversial source of legitimation for American foreign policy. This seminar asks: how did all this come to be? We will investigate human rights not only as theories embodied in texts, but as practices embedded in specific historical contexts. Are human rights the product of a peculiarly European heritage, of the Enlightenment and protestantism? How did Americans reconcile inalienable rights with the reality of slavery? Did human rights serve as a "civilizing" mask for colonialism? Can universal rights be reconciled with genuine cultural diversity? Through case studies and close readings, the seminar will work toward a genealogy of human rights.
                Instructors: 
                NATHANS, BENJAMIN
                Day and Time: 
                R 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 

                VAN PELT LIBRARY 627

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 
                  Syllabus: 

                  HIST418 - EURO INTELLCT SINCE 1945

                  Description: 
                  This course concentrates on French intellectual history after 1945, with some excursions into Germany. We will explore changing conceptions of the intellectual, from Sartre's concenpt of the 'engagement' to Foucault's idea of the 'specific intellectual'; the rise and fall of existentialism; structuralism and poststructuralism; and the debate over 'postmodernity.'
                  Instructors: 
                  BRECKMAN, WARREN
                  Day and Time: 
                  W 0200PM-0500PM
                  Room: 

                  COLLEGE HALL 315A

                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

                    HIST230 - WAR AND CONQUEST IN THE MIDDLE AGES

                    Description: 
                    This course will focus on wars of conquest in the medieval period. The code of chivalry demanded that knights not only display great prowess in battle, but also adhere to Christian virtue. How did these square in practice? What constitutes acceptable violence and military intervention? We will seek to understand the medieval mentality of warfare in order to think about the place of war in society, how war was justified, why war was fought, and how it was fought. War, however, cannot be separated from its goals. We will thus go beyond the battlefield to look at how conquest of territories was cemented with the establishment and enforcement of a new order. Themes will include the rise of knighthood, ideas of just war, crusade, laws of war, territorial control and colonization. The course will also include two fabulous field trips to visit Penn’s manuscript collection and the arms and armor collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
                    Instructors: 
                    KUSKOWSKI, ADA
                    Day and Time: 
                    T 0130PM-0430PM
                    Room: 

                    COLLEGE HALL 311F

                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
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