Seminar

HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS

Instructors: 
VITIELLO, DOMENIC
Day and Time: 
T 0130PM-0430PM
Room: 
MCNEIL BUILDING 110
Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

    HIST211 - THE ENLIGHTENMENT

    Instructors: 
    DEJEAN, JOAN
    Day and Time: 
    W 0200PM-0500PM
    Room: 
    VAN PELT LIBRARY 605
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

      HIST211 - JEWISH HISTORY & MEMORY

      Description: 
      The seminar will consider Jewish reflections on the meaning of the past from the Bible until the present. It will present a survey of the history of Jewish historical writing including Josephus, medieval chronicles written both in the Moslem and Christian worlds, Jewish histories of the Renaissance and Early Modern Europe, and the rise of the academic study of Judaism in the 19th-century. It will conclude with a consideration of modern and contemporary historical trends. The alleged tension between Jewish notions of memory and the modern writing of history, as articulated in Yosef Yerushalmi's well Known book ZACHOR, will be a consistent theme throughout the course. Considerable reading of primary sources. A reading knowledge of Hebrew is helpful but not required.
      Instructors: 
      RUDERMAN, DAVID
      Day and Time: 
      T 0300PM-0600PM
      Room: 

      COLLEGE HALL 315A

      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

        HIST216 - RELIGION & COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA

        Description: 
        This course is designed to introduce students to the religious experiences of Africans and to the politics of culture. We will examine how traditional African religious ideas and practices interacted with Christianity and Islam. We will look specifically at religious expressions among the Yoruba, Southern African independent churches and millenarist movements, and the variety of Muslim organizations that developed during the colonial era. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, to develop in students an awareness of the wide range of meanings of conversion and people's motives in creating and adhering to religious institutions; Second, to examine the political, cultural, and psychological dimensions in the expansion of religious social movements; And third, to investigate the role of religion as counterculture and instrument of resistance to European hegemony. Topics include: Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements in Kenya and Tanzania, Chimurenga in Mozambique, Watchtower churches in Southern Africa, anti-colonial Jihads in Sudan and Somalia and mystical Muslim orders in Senegal.
        Instructors: 
        BABOU, CHEIKH
        Day and Time: 
        R 0130PM-0430PM
        Room: 

        COLLEGE HALL 217

        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Registration Notes: 
          BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

          HIST220 - RUSSIA AND THE WEST

          Instructors: 
          PEENEY, MOLLY
          Day and Time: 
          TR 0300PM-0430PM
          Room: 
          WILLIAMS HALL 421
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Registration Notes: 
            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

            HIST230 - THE CITY OF ROME: FROM CONSTANTINE TO THE BORGIAS

            Description: 
            The great city of Rome outlived its empire and its emperors. What happened to the Eternal City after “the fall of the Roman Empire in the West?” In this course, we will follow the story of this great city, its people, its buildings old and new, and its legacy across Italy, Europe, and beyond. Rome rebuilt and reshaped itself through the Middle Ages: home for popes, destination for pilgrims, power broker for Italy. It became a great Renaissance and early modern city, a center of art and architecture, of religion, and of politics. We will be reading a mix of primary sources and modern scholarship. All required texts are in English, though students who take this course for Italian Studies credit may choose to read some works in Italian.
            Instructors: 
            MOYER, ANN
            Day and Time: 
            T 0130PM-0430PM
            Room: 

            COLLEGE HALL 217

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Syllabus: 

              HIST230 - MACHIAVELLI & MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

              Description: 
              Niccolò Machiavelli, the Renaissance author best known for The Prince, is frequently regarded as a consummate cynic. Yet he has been not only a provocation but an inspiration throughout the subsequent history of political thought. This was true for the entire twentieth century, which witnessed an ever-growing interest in the Florentine thinker among historians and philosophers alike. One of the most surprising dimensions of this modern engagement with Machiavelli is surely his recurring presence as figure and motif within left-wing philosophical discourse. In light of the failure of the twentieth-century’s revolutionary experiments, as well as its own entanglements with those experiments, how could radical theory understand its past and imagine its future? What vision could supplant the dimming of utopia? Such questions have frequently led recent theorists into melancholic resignation, but they have also provoked innovative and rigorous attempts to rethink the project of radical politics as radical democracy. How is it that Machiavelli, a thinker indelibly associated with the cynical and amoral manipulation of politics, could become an inspiration for theorists of a robust democratic life? This course will examine this curious history of influence and transformation. Starting with an examination of key texts by Machiavelli himself, we will then trace his reception in European intellectual history, focusing upon the twentieth century. Among authors we will consider will be Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Hannah Arendt, Leo Strauss, John Pocock, Quentin Skinner, Antonio Gramsci, Louis Althusser, John McCormick, and Antonio Negri.
              Instructors: 
              BRECKMAN, WARREN
              Day and Time: 
              W 0200PM-0500PM
              Room: 

              MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST230 - THE NAZI REVOLUTION: POWER AND IDEOLOGY

                Description: 
                More than seventy years have passed since Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allied Powers on May 8, 1945, but no agreement has emerged on what Nazism was, how Hitler’s regime functioned, how much support it had, why and how it managed the extermination of European Jewry, whether it was ‘a terror state’ or rested on a broad popular consensus. This course will look at Nazism from several angles and focus, in particular, on the power of its ideology and its embodiment and dissemination by the arts. Nazism took the arts very seriously. Hitler always saw himself as an artist and he made certain that the regime expressed the Nazi ‘revolution’ in new and radical forms of art, especially a new culture of the body – strength and beauty combined in a pure, warlike Aryan. The course will investigate the development of the avant-garde arts beyond the first third of the 20th century into the politics of the Nazi regime. We will focus on the relationship between art and politics in the “Age of extremes” (Eric Hobsbawm). The course will also look at the nature of Nazi power and the structure of the Nazi state: how it developed and grew after 1933. The rearmament of Germany and the smashing of the Versailles settlement of 1919, two main aims of Nazi foreign policy, were accomplished by 1936, and the growth of the power of the SS changed the internal politics of the regime. Was ‘terror’ essential to Hitler’s regime and what does the word ‘describe’? Finally, the course will consider the war and Hitler’s aims for world conquest, the extermination of the Jews and the final stage of complete destructiveness at home and abroad. The course will be an active seminar in which students will be expected to read and discuss sources in class. These sources will combine scholarly analyses, works of art and their interpretation, together with political statements and ideological sources. Students will be expected to present one set of literature or class material, connected to one of the themes of the seminar. The course will end with a take-home exam composed of interpretations of selections from the texts we have read and an essay on the issues raised by discussions in class.
                Instructors: 
                STEINBERG, JONATHAN
                KANT, MARION
                Day and Time: 
                T 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 

                MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST230 - London, Paris, Vienna: Life in a Modernizing City a Global Context

                  Description: 
                  Over the course of the nineteenth century, European cities modernized in many significant ways that turned them into the cities we know today – they lit their streets with gas lamps, tore down dark narrow alleyways in favour of building large boulevards, they built up modern police forces to crack down on urban crime and prostitution. But nineteenth-century cities also had features we rarely see in cities today – they built factories, which encouraged urbanization, leading to overcrowding, shanty-towns, and widespread illness, and they sometimes lacked adequate sewage disposal. What was it like to live in a major European city in this time of rapid change and development? This course looks at three cities – London, Paris, and Vienna – and traces how they changed over the nineteenth century, and how those changes affected the people who lived in those cities. We will look at travel guides and travelogues, memoires, and novels to reconstruct the lives of urban-dwellers, and to trace how these cities changed in the wake of industrialization, urbanization, and imperialism. Selected Readings: Carl Schorske, Fin de siècle Vienna; Jerrold Seigel, Bohemian Paris; Amanda Thomas, Lambeth Cholera Outbreak; Aimée Boutin, City of Noise: Sound and Nineteenth-Century Paris; Richard Hopkins, Planning the Greenspaces of nineteenth-century Paris; Augustus Pugin, Paris and its environs.
                  Instructors: 
                  DELLA ZAZZERA, ELIZABETH
                  Day and Time: 
                  CANCELED
                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    This is an LPS course. Registration may be limited to LPS students.

                    HIST231 - PURITANS TO RELIGIOUS RIGHT: RELIGION AND POLITICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

                    Description: 
                    How is it that America came to see itself as "God's country" or a Christian nation? Why did Protestant denominations proliferate in the 19th century after disestablishment? Why were certain groups' religious practices restricted despite religious freedom? When did presidents start ending inaugural addresses with "God Bless the United States of America"? This course traces the intersection of religion and politics in America from the colonial period to the present. We will cover such topics as Puritan theocracy and early experiments with religious freedom in the colonies, the move towards separation of church and state in the new nation, the rise of religious voluntarism, constitutional challenges, civil religion and the presidency, and religious pluralism and the limits of democracy and religious tolerance. *Dr. Hanson recently published an article in Time magazine about religion and Trump's inaugural address: http://time.com/4642696/donald-trump-god-faith/ *
                    Instructors: 
                    HANSON, RICHARD
                    Day and Time: 
                    R 0130PM-0430PM
                    Room: 

                    COLLEGE HALL 311F

                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Syllabus: 
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