Seminar

HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS

Description: 
Students in this seminar will choose their own research topic in the history of feminism. With guidance and support each person will produce a twenty-page paper based on intensive work with primary sources. Our shared readings will focus on the sometimes overlapping and sometimes divergent feminist histories that can be traced in the writings and cultural products of people in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. We’ll take a long view, beginning in the sixteenth century, and use an expansive frame. Our purpose will not be to decide who was or wasn’t ‘a feminist’ but instead to try to understand the social life of ideas that included aspects of what more recent activists mean by the term, while also being attentive to the reasons why actions and concepts from past worlds can’t be imported very easily into our own.
Instructors: 
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Day and Time: 
M 0200PM-0500PM
Room: 

COLLEGE HALL 318

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 

    HIST233 - BRAZIL: LAND OF THE FUTURE?

    Description: 
    “Brazil is the country of tomorrow, and always will be.” This ironic observation—often expressed by the Brazilians themselves—neatly encapsulates the perceived gap between longstanding predictions of Brazil’s rise to great power status and its continuing struggles with social and racial inequalities, economic instability, and authoritarian political practices. This perception has deeply informed the way historians approach the history of Brazil, which has routinely been portrayed as a series of failures or missed opportunities. It has also indirectly influenced how visitors (actual and virtual) perceive Brazil; they revel in its rich popular culture, mixed racial identities, and lush tropical forests, but have no idea that Brazil has one of the largest industrial economies and middle-class populations in the world. Recent trends, however, have prompted observers both within and outside Brazil to suggest that tomorrow has finally arrived—that Brazil has now reached a new, sustainable level of economic development, accompanied by real progress in reducing poverty and expanding political participation by all segments of society. Whether these claims of success at last will stand the test of time remains to be seen, but they will likely motivate historians to rethink the standard narratives of Brazilian history. The historical period that is the focus of this course has witnessed Brazil’s transformation from a colonial, agrarian, slave society to a predominantly urban, industrialized nation, and an aspiring world power. This course will focus on postcolonial Brazil and key topics include racism, slavery, and emancipation as well as urban life, immigration, industrialization, changing gender roles, Carnaval, popular culture, and democratization.
    Instructors: 
    SQUARE, JONATHAN
    Day and Time: 
    T 0130PM-0430PM
    Room: 

    COLLEGE HALL 311A

    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

      HIST233 - Asian Migration and the Making of Modern Asia, 1800 to the present

      Description: 
      The sanctity of national borders and territory has become an increasingly contentious issue between East Asian nation/states in recent years. Chinese, Korean, Japanese and other national claims to maritime territory are often based on historical claims—that territory before the era of imperialism the territory was under the exclusive control of their nation. However this elides a longer history of migration before and during the modern era that helped to shape today’s territorial borders, shared culture, and economic interdependence in East Asia. This course explores the effects of migration on the process of modernization in East Asia in order to reveal a more complicated history of race and identity, cultural exchange, and globalized labor and capital networks connecting Asian nations to each other and the world.
      Instructors: 
      HEGWOOD, ROBERT
      Day and Time: 
      CANCELED
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 
        Syllabus: 
        Registration Notes: 
        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        This is an LPS course. Registration may be limited to LPS students.

        HIST234 - URBANIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS

        Description: 
        Urbanization emerged as the subject of political debate and artistic intervention alongside the formation of a predominantly industrial world-economy in the 19th century. Across Europe, America, and the colonized world, artists, designers, and theorists sought to alter the processes of urbanization and imagine alternatives to metropolitan society. During decolonization and the Cold War, urban discourse and practice increasingly focused on the management of scarce resources, and on the ethics of centralizing urban managerial authority in the hands of a few experts. The contemporary global economy, unlike the antecedent world-economy, is remarkably non-urban: financial and political power is no longer exclusively concentrated in a few metropolitan cities, and initiatives to reshape urbanization are now principally conceived of in terms of eco-systems, historic preservation, or human rights. This seminar examines debates that informed the theory and practice of modern city-making. Readings include Charles Baudelaire, W.E.B. Du Bois, M.K. Gandhi, Siegfried Kracauer, Octavio Paz, Huey P. Newton, Jane Jacobs, Saskia Sassen, and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Artistic works and designs analyzed include Nadar’s Egouts de Paris, garden suburbs in Cape Town, Corbusier’s Chandigarh, Doxiadis in Baghdad, the Ford Foundation plan for Calcutta, self-help housing in Lima, Anand Patwardhan’s Humara Shahar, and HBO’s The Wire.
        Instructors: 
        BANERJI, SHIBEN
        Day and Time: 
        R 0130PM-0430PM
        Room: 

        EDUCATION BUILDING 007

        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 
          Syllabus: 

          HIST247 - MARTIANS IN NEW JERSEY: MEDIA, PERFORMANCE AND AMERICA IN 1938

          Description: 
          In the most famous of Halloween pranks, in 1938, Orson Welles broadcast the annihilation of the world, and in doing so, blurred the bounds between fiction and reality. Told through a series of newscasts, the program, “The War of the Worlds,” led many to believe that Martians had indeed attacked the United States. Aired as radio was becoming a leading source of entertainment and news, this radio play would become one of the new medium’s most recalled, and most controversial, programs. In this course, we will use the story of Welles’s play to open a window into the United States in the Great Depression and on the eve of World War II. That story will help us consider America’s early engagement with radio and the mass media, the possibilities for storytelling on the air, and the connections between media and manipulation. To explore such topics in depth, performance will be a key compenent of the course: Students will develop and deliver a “broadcast” of the play, through which we will consider radio theater and the world of “War of the Worlds.”
          Instructors: 
          MALAGUE, ROSEMARY
          LENTHALL, BRUCE
          Day and Time: 
          TR 0300PM-0430PM
          Room: 

          FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 
            Registration Notes: 
            BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

            HIST230 - TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HIST: NAZI GERMANY: POWER AND IDEOLOGY

            Description: 
            More than seventy years have passed since Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allied Powers on May 8, 1945, but no agreement has emerged on what Nazism was, how Hitler’s regime functioned, how much support it had, why and how they attempted the extermination of the entire Jewish people, whether it was ‘a terror state’ or rested on a broad popular consensus. This course will look at Nazism from several angles, and focus in particular on the power of its ideology and its embodiment and dissemination by the arts. Nazism took the arts very seriously. Hitler always saw himself as an artist and he made certain that the regime expressed the Nazi ‘revolution’ in new and radical forms of art, especially a new culture of the body – strength and beauty combined in a pure, warlike Aryan. The course will investigate the development of the avant-garde arts beyond the first third of the 20th century into the politics of the Nazi regime. We will focus on the relationship between art and politics in the “Age of extremes” (Eric Hobsbawm). The course will also look at the nature of Nazi power and the structure of the Nazi state: how it developed and grew after 1933. The rearmament of Germany and the smashing of the Versailles settlement of 1919, two main aims of Nazi foreign policy, were accomplished by 1936, and the growth of the power of the SS changed the internal politics of the regime. Was ‘terror’ essential to Hitler’s regime and what does the word ‘describe’? Finally the course will consider the war and Hitler’s aims for world conquest, the extermination of the Jews and the final stage of complete destructiveness at home and abroad.
            Instructors: 
            STEINBERG, JONATHAN
            KANT, MARION
            Day and Time: 
            T 0130PM-0430PM
            Room: 

            FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 
              Syllabus: 

              HIST231 - TOPICS IN US HISTORY: EARLY AMERICAN STUDIES

              Description: 
              Nowadays many Early Americanists have turned to cultural history. There have been different reasons for such a shift, which is built on solid empirical foundations laid by demographers and social historians beginning in the early 1960s. One contributing element was surely the history of early American religion, always interested in what sermons and doctrinal reform meant for clergy and laity alike. Another element came from cultural anthropology, with its interest in specific communities and the textual webs of symbolic meaning that tied families to families, and individuals to one another. American art and material culture offered its concern with social aesthetics and questions of exchange value. Still another set of connections came as the walls between early American literature and early American history--disciplinary fences, as it were-- started to crumble. But no matter the perspective taken, these approaches intersect in reconstructing the systems of meaning that held colonial societies together and, on occasion, signaled their transformation. This semester we will be examining key moments in the emergence of the field, works that explore interdisciplinary methods and theoretical approaches as well as offering new models for historical narrative itself. And while most of our readings and discussion will explore changes in early American culture between 1600 and 1785-- or roughly from the period of imperial exploration and initial settlement to the Revolutionary settlement, and native reactions to settlement colonialism-- some aspects of early national and antebellum culture will fall within consideration.
              Instructors: 
              ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
              Day and Time: 
              W 0200PM-0500PM
              Room: 
              COLLEGE HALL 311A
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 
                Syllabus: 

                HIST231 - JAPANESE-AMERICAN INTERNMENT

                Description: 
                This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
                Instructors: 
                AZUMA, EIICHIRO
                Day and Time: 
                T 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 

                COLLEGE HALL 311F

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 
                  Registration Notes: 
                  CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

                  HIST232 - WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE EAST: A MODERN HISTORY

                  Description: 
                  How have women, as subjects, objects, and agents, shaped the history of the modern Middle East? Until relatively recently, the history of women in the Middle East was characterized in a two dimensional way – as objects in need of reform, or victimized subjects in need of saving. This course will examine a wide breadth of work from the past two decades that has worked to show the myriad and diverse ways in which women have impacted the history of this region in the modern era, and ask serious questions about what that means for our contemporary views on the region. Students will be introduced to cutting edge scholarship that mines previously ignored or unheard of sources on women’s history, and will be encouraged themselves to write and reflect on women’s history from many different vantages and lenses. The course will be organized around thematic concepts including labor history, urban history, reproductive politics, fashion and geopolitics.
                  Instructors: 
                  RYAN, JAMES
                  Day and Time: 
                  R 0130PM-0430PM
                  Room: 

                  COLLEGE HALL 311A

                  Activity: 
                  SEM
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Syllabus: 

                    HIST202 - EUROPEAN REVOLUTIONS

                    Description: 
                    This course tells the history of Europe in the long nineteenth century through its revolutions – beginning with France in 1789 and ending with Russia in 1917. For each revolution we will focus on particular themes or aspects: such as, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, economics, gender, arts and literature, violence and warfare, or sociability. In doing so we will also attempt to answer the question, what is a revolution? What makes it different from an uprising, a revolt, or a struggle for independence? What are the shared characteristics of revolutions, and what makes one different from another? And how have historians characterized revolutions? By looking at laws, speeches, diaries, works of art, and other primary sources alongside works of historical scholarship, students will work to develop their own understanding of nineteenth-century European revolutions and the role they played in the development of new ideas, in social change, and in the emergence of modern Europe. Evaluation will be based on class participation, a book review, a presentation, and a final paper based on course readings.
                    Instructors: 
                    DELLA ZAZZERA, ELIZABETH
                    Day and Time: 
                    R 0130PM-0430PM
                    Room: 

                    COLLEGE HALL 311F

                    Activity: 
                    SEM
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Syllabus: 
                      Syndicate content