US

HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias

Description: 
This course engages scholarship on colonialism and empire in the context of Spanish settlement in North America, in the region stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, known as the Spanish borderlands. We will examine the exploration, colonization, and expansion by Spanish officials and settlers as well as their attempts to impose an imperial vision of race, religion, and law on the lives of Native peoples, African Americans, and other Europeans in East and West Florida, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Alta and Baja California. We will also compare European conquests (Spanish, French, and English) and various independence movements across North America (the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and Mexican Independence) to understand how and why these events succeeded or failed and their connections to the Spanish borderlands. We will conclude by considering the extent to which borderlands histories are essential to the study of early America as they reflect culturally dynamic experiences in areas that would later become part of the United States and its legacy of empire.
Instructors: 
GALLMAN, NANCY
Day and Time: 
R 0300PM-0600PM
Room: 

MEYERSON HALL B7

Activity: 
SEM
Cross Listings: 
    Registration Notes: 
    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

    HIST356 - AGE OF REAGAN: U.S. POLITICS AND SOCIETY, 1960-2001

    Description: 
    This course explores significant political and social developments that shaped the final decades of twentieth century U.S. history, an era notable for declining faith in political institutions, ideological and partisan polarization, and a variety of new rights claims by marginalized citizens. Until very recently, scholars have characterized this period as one of conservative political resurgence spurred by its most towering figure, Ronald Reagan, the nation’s 40th president. While Reagan is an essential actor in this class, the course will consider a variety of perspectives, developments, and movements across the political spectrum as well as others that defy easy ideological or partisan categorization. In addition to tracing the transformation of the major political parties and ideologies, topics may include the evolution of the post-1960s civil rights movement and the rise of the incarceration crisis; the rise and transformation of the religious right; the AIDS crisis and the LGBTQ movement; and the emergence of the concept of the “free market” as an idealized way of reordering not just social and political commitments but society itself.
    Instructors: 

    CEBUL, RANDALL

    Day and Time: 
    TR 1200PM-0130PM
    Room: 
    MEYERSON HALL B13
    Activity: 
    LEC
    Cross Listings: 
      • Major Concentrations: American
      • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US

      HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

      Instructors: 
      FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
      Day and Time: 
      W 0530PM-0830PM
      Room: 
      MCNEIL BUILDING 285
      Activity: 
      SEM
      Cross Listings: 
        Registration Notes: 
        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.

        HIST231 - PATRIOTS, PARTIES AND PROGRESSIVES: THE U.S. 1776-1906

        Description: 
        This course examines the history of the “long” nineteenth century in the United States. We will begin with the formation of the republic in the aftermath of the American Revolution and end in the Progressive Era. Particular emphasis will be placed on political and social history. Topics include: the formation and destruction of political party systems, reform movements, religious revivalism and identity, Indian removal, continental expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, labor movements, immigration, and transformations in transportation, communication, and consumption.
        Instructors: 
        GRONNINGSATER, SARAH
        Day and Time: 
        R 0130PM-0430PM
        Room: 

        MEYERSON HALL B5

        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST231 - LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE

          Description: 
          This is a course in the history of law and social change. Discussion of assigned readings and papers will focus on the role law, lawyers, judges, other public officials and policy advocates and social movements and networks have played in proposing solutions to specific problems. The course will focus on evaluating the importance or lack thereof of historical perspective and legal expertise in making social change. Assigned readings will be discussed in class. Each student will submit a paper based on primary and secondary material on a topic of her choosing within the overall subject matter of the course. Paper drafts will be discussed in class. The Final Paper is due at the beginning of the final examination period.
          Instructors: 
          BERRY, MARY
          Day and Time: 
          T 0130PM-0430PM
          Room: 

          COLLEGE HALL 315A

          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST231 - CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

            Description: 
            This course traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement from its earliest stirrings in the 1st half of the twentieth-century to the boycotts, sit-ins, school desegregation struggles, freedom rides and marches of the 1950s and 1960s, and beyond. Among the question we will consider are: What inspired the Civil Rights movement, when does it begin and end, and how did it change American life? Readings will include both historical works and first-hand accounts of the movement by participants.
            Instructors: 
            BAY, MIA
            Day and Time: 
            W 0330PM-0630PM
            Room: 

            VAN PELT LIBRARY 305

            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST234 - ABOLITIONISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY

              Description: 
              This class develops a transnational and global approach to the rise of abolitionism in the nineteenth century. In a comparative framework, the class traces the rise of abolitionism in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia, examining the suppression of the transatlantic slave trade, the rise of colonialism in Africa, and the growth of forced labor in the wake of transatlantic slave trade. We will deal with key debates in the literature of African, Atlantic and Global histories, including the causes and motivations of abolitionism, the relationship between the suppression of the slave trade and the growth of forced labor in Africa, the historical ties between abolitionism and the early stages of colonialism in Africa, the flow of indentured laborers from Asia to the Americas in the wake of the slave trade. This class is primarily geared towards the production of a research paper. *Depending on the research paper topic, History Majors and Minors can use this course to fulfill the US, Europe, Latin America or Africa requirement.*
              Day and Time: 
              M 0200PM-0500PM
              Room: 

              VAN PELT LIBRARY 305

              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST241 - PERFORMING HISTORY

                Description: 
                This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view.
                Instructors: 
                ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
                Day and Time: 
                R 0130PM-0430PM
                Room: 

                COLLEGE HALL 311A

                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST331 - AM DIPLO HIST SINCE 1776

                  Description: 
                  U.S. Diplomatic History since 1776 is a survey course examining the evolution of American foreign policy from the birth of our nation to the end of the Cold War. The lectures, textbook, and supplementary readings trace the origins and effects of the 8 great traditions in U.S. foreign policy over America's two century transformation from struggling new nation to world power. Two essay assignments plus a bluebook final exam.
                  Instructors: 
                  MCDOUGALL, WALTER
                  Day and Time: 
                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                  Room: 
                  COLLEGE HALL 200
                  Activity: 
                  LEC
                  Cross Listings: 

                    HIST168 - HIST OF AMER LAW TO 1877

                    Description: 
                    The course surveys the development of law in the U.S. to 1877, including such subjects as: the evolution of the legal profession, the transformation of English law during the American Revolution, the making and implementation of the Constitution, and issues concerning business and economic development, the law of slavery, the status of women, and civil rights.
                    Instructors: 
                    BERRY, MARY
                    Day and Time: 
                    TR 1030AM-1200PM
                    Room: 
                    COLLEGE HALL 314
                    Activity: 
                    LEC
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US
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