US

HIST451 - US AND THE WORLD SINCE 1898

Description: 
This class examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power since 1898, and considers both the international and domestic consequences of U.S. foreign relations. In one respect, the twentieth century was a strange time to become a global empire: it was the period when colonial systems centered in Europe, Russia, Japan, and Turkey collapsed, and new nations emerged throughout Africa and Asia. This class explores the changing strategies of military, economic, and political intervention that the U.S. pursued as colonization lost legitimacy. Within that framework, the class invites students to think about several questions: How did the idea and practice of empire change over the twentieth century? How did the United States relate to new visions of independence emerging in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How did global interactions both inform and reflect racial ideology in the United States? Finally, how did international affairs transform U.S. politics and social movements?
Instructors: 
OFFNER, AMY
Day and Time: 
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 

    HIST463 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION

    Description: 
    This course will examine the growth and development of American schools, from the birth of the republic into the present. By 1850, the United States sent a greater fraction of its children to school than any other nation on earth. Why? What did young people learn there? And, most of all, how did these institutions both reflect and shape our evolving conceptions of "America" itself?
    Instructors: 
    ZIMMERMAN, JONATHAN
    Day and Time: 
    MW 0200PM-0330PM
    Room: 
    EDUCATION BUILDING 203
    Activity: 
    SEM
    Cross Listings: 
      Registration Notes: 
      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US
      • Major Concentrations: American
      • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US

      HIST367 - PHILADELPHIA 1700-2000

      Instructors: 
      HANSON, RICHARD
      Day and Time: 
      T 0600PM-0900PM
      Room: 
      WILLIAMS HALL 219
      Activity: 
      LEC
      Cross Listings: 
        • Major Concentrations: American
        • Major/Minor requirements fulfilled: US

        HIST231 - WARTIME INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE AMERICANS

        Description: 
        This research seminar will consist of a review of representative studies on the Japanese American internment, and a discussion of how social scientists and historians have attempted to explain its complex backgrounds and causes. Through the careful reading of academic works, primary source materials, and visualized narratives (film productions), students will learn the basic historiography of internment studies, research methodologies, and the politics of interpretation pertaining to this particular historical subject. Students will also examine how Japanese Americans and others have attempted to reclaim a history of the wartime internment from the realm of “detached” academia in the interest of their lives in the “real” world, and for a goal of “social justice” in general. The class will critically probe the political use of history and memories of selected pasts in both Asian American community and contemporary American society through the controversial issue of the Japanese American internment.
        Instructors: 
        AZUMA, EIICHIRO
        Day and Time: 
        T 0130PM-0430PM
        Activity: 
        SEM
        Cross Listings: 

          HIST233 - CORRUPTION, COLLUSION, AND COMMMERCE IN EARLY AMERICA AND THE CARRIBEAN

          Description: 
          Corruption in politics and economics has become a significant issue in the modern world. This course introduces students to the study of corruption and collusion from the perspective of early America and the Caribbean from 1500 through 1820. By examining the historical evolution of corruption, the course addresses questions such as: What is corruption and, by contrast, what is good governance? Who creates law and when is it enforced? Can societies be corrupt or only institutions? And, does economic corruption help or hurt financial development? Our readings and discussion will examine the intersection of politics, culture, gender, and economics. We will reflect on how early Americans understood corruption and collusion and what that can tell us about similar modern issues. In the end, the course focuses on the concept of corruption as a complex social function through the lens of bribery, piracy, sex crimes, and other forms of social deviancy.
          Instructors: 
          SCHMITT, CASEY
          Day and Time: 
          M 0330PM-0630PM
          Activity: 
          SEM
          Cross Listings: 

            HIST234 - THE HORSE IN WORLD HIST

            Description: 
            Around 8000 years ago, communities in the western part of the Eurasian steppe began to breed and ride horses. This process of domestication made horses central participants in human history. The domestication of the horse transformed military tactics, human mobility and communication, agriculture, and entertainment. Humans have transformed the horse as well, producing about 200 breeds with unique characteristics matched to human goals. This course traces the history of equine-human relations across the globe, using the horse as a focal point to think about animal-human relations in societies ranging from prehistoric Europe to the Spanish conquests of Latin America. Our inquiry will address not only the place of horses in these particular phases of world history, but also by extension the debates about human-animal relations in our society today. The Major or Minor geographic requirement fulfilled by this course will be determined by an individual student’s research paper topic
            Instructors: 
            AGUIRRE MANDUJANO, OSCAR
            Day and Time: 
            T 0130PM-0430PM
            Activity: 
            SEM
            Cross Listings: 

              HIST234 - The Catholic World, Medieval to Modern

              Description: 
              Rebuild my Church – this was the divine message that Francis of Assisi believed he heard at the dawn of the thirteenth century. It became the basis of his mission to reform Catholicism and, over 800 years later, his reformation was embraced symbolically when Jorge Bergoglio assumed the name of Pope Francis I. What exactly was the species of Catholicism that they encountered and in what new directions did they lead it? Just after the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Reformation was celebrated around the world last year, this moment is a singular opportunity to study the longer term evolutions and reformations in the history of Catholicism in which the Protestant reformations are situated. This course introduces students to the global history of Catholicism over the last millennium. It will trace the development of this religion as an institution and set of doctrines interacting with concrete historical circumstances. It also will investigate what it was like to live Catholicism in different eras and different places, moving across Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa between the High Middle Ages and the modern globalized world. No prior knowledge is required. Students will evaluate our knowledge about this subject through close examination of primary texts, material artifacts, audio-visual sources, and modern historical scholarship, posting regular discussion questions for the benefit of the seminar. The course will feature a midterm exam and a final essay of 8-12 pages (or final exam in lieu of a final essay). This course may be taken to fulfill the following requirements for Penn History Majors and Minors: Pre-1800, SEM, and one of the following geographic areas, depending on the topic of the student's research paper: Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, U.S.
              Instructors: 
              CHEELY, DANIEL
              Day and Time: 
              M 0600PM-0900PM
              Activity: 
              SEM
              Cross Listings: 

                HIST243 - THE AMERICAN WOMEN'S MOVEMENT AND LGBT LIBERATION, 1960S-1980S

                Description: 
                This seminar explores the history of the feminist and LGBT movements from the mid-1960s to mid-1980s in Philadelphia. Although there will be some attention to national organizations, we will focus on social and political activism as it was made in local groups and spaces. We will explore the social and cultural web that fostered activism, for example, in gay and lesbian coffee houses, campus women's centers, bookstores, and radio shows. We will also pay attention to groups and actions that may not have been self-consciously defined as "feminist" or "gay liberationist," but had important effects on social change related to gender and sexuality; these include African American, Latino/a, and working-class organizations. This is a hands-on research seminar, with students exploring local archives and special collections to document and analyze these complex movements. Each student will conduct an oral history, analyze a set of published and printed sources, and write a paper based on archival research.
                Instructors: 
                PEISS, KATHY
                Day and Time: 
                T 0130PM-0430PM
                Activity: 
                SEM
                Cross Listings: 

                  HIST346 - BODIES, RACE AND RIGHTS: SEX AND CITIZENSHIP IN MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY

                  Description: 
                  What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens.
                  Instructors: 
                  BROWN, KATHLEEN
                  Day and Time: 
                  MW 1200PM-0100PM
                  Activity: 
                  LEC
                  Cross Listings: 
                    Registration Notes: 
                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

                    HIST155 - INTRO TO ASIAN AMER HIST

                    Description: 
                    This course will provide an introduction to the history of Asian Pacific Americans, focusing on the wide diversity of migrant experiences, as well as the continuing legacies of Orientalism on American-born APA's. Issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality will also be examined.
                    Instructors: 
                    AZUMA, EIICHIRO
                    Day and Time: 
                    MW 0330PM-0500PM
                    Room: 
                    ARTS, RSRCH & CULTR - 3601 LO 208
                    Activity: 
                    LEC
                    Cross Listings: 
                      Registration Notes: 
                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                      Syndicate content