Economic

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST107302
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FOR HUNTSMAN STUDENTS ONLY; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST372 - THE HISTORY OF FOREIGN AID IN AFRICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST372 - THE HISTORY OF FOREIGN AID IN AFRICA
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST372401
Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
CASSANELLI, LEE
Description
This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.
Course number only
372
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST124 - ECON HIST,1600-PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST124 - ECON HIST,1600-PRESENT
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST124001
Meeting times
TR 0900AM-1030AM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Economic affairs dominate much of our daily lives and an appreciation of how our economic world evolved is essential for an intelligent understanding of today's society. This course will survey the world's economic history from 1600 to the present. It will consider the evolution of government policies, the growth of trade, business and industry, the economic inter-relationship between regions, governments and business, and, of course, their effect on ordinary people's economic lives.
Course number only
124
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST447 - HISTORIES OF THE INFORMATION ECONOMY

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST447 - HISTORIES OF THE INFORMATION ECONOMY
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST447001
Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 421
Instructors
FLANDREAU, MARC
Description
This course provides a perspective on the role of information as a historical actor. Moving beyond common narratives of the progress of the information economy driven by technological factors, the course underscores the significance of what may be called the political economies of information. We will approach major works, dealing with the historical importance of information (Foucault, Cohn, Habermas) and simultaneously engages with the history of institutions to store and circulate information. We will emphasize the importance of value (social, political, economic) which is at the heart of information gathering and producing. In particular, we will discuss the rise and fall of institutions to store and circulate information. We will study the importance of information in historical processes such as imperialism and colonization, state building, propaganda, the Enlightenment, as well as the informational aspects of the rise of global NGOs and international organization, police and spying. Information may be accumulated or lost; it can be safeguarded or debased; it can confer power or undermine it. In the age of fake news, these are issues worthy of a closer interest.
Course number only
447
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 1
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST130 - Globalization in Historical Perspective

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST130 - Globalization in Historical Perspective
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST130601
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
W 0600PM-0900PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 723
Instructors
SCHAD, GEOFFREY
Description
Globalization seems the essence of modernity, but it is not a new phenomena. The world has already witnessed several eras of globalization, each of which transformed and changed the world in often similar but sometime unique fashions. This course will look at continuing trends towards globalization and consider its rich history and the contentious arguments that it has always provoked. Although the focus of the course will be on globalization during the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also consider earlier episodes of globalization, to fully appreciate its evolution and importance.
Course number only
130
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST206 - THINKING ABT CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - THINKING ABT CAPITALISM
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST206302
Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 311A
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST131 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN, PAST AND PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST131 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN, PAST AND PRESENT
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST131401
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
STITELER HALL B26
Instructors
FLANDREAU, MARC
Description
Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.
Course number only
131
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST209401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 110
Instructors
SIDORICK, DANIEL
Description
Although most U.S. cities are no longer thought of as "industrial cities," metropolitan areas today are all products of industrial economies, technologies, and social systems. This course explores the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization have shaped North American cities over the past two centuries. Major themes include economic geography, ecology, labor and production, suburbanization, outsourcing, energy, and cities' place in the world economy. The class will take regular walking tours of Philadelphia neighborhoods.
Course number only
209
Cross listings
URBS103401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 116
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST440401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT

Meeting times
M 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4C4
Instructors
FISCHER-HOFFMAN, CORY
Description
Orientation to the profession, tracing the evolution of city and regional planning from its late nineteenth century roots to its twentieth century expression. Field trips included.
Course number only
440
Cross listings
SOCI420401 URBS420401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST175 - HISTORY OF BRAZIL

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST175 - HISTORY OF BRAZIL
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
TEIXEIRA, MELISSA
Course number only
175
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST209401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 110
Instructors
VITIELLO, DOMENIC
Description
Although most U.S. cities are no longer thought of as "industrial cities," metropolitan areas today are all products of industrial economies, technologies, and social systems. This course explores the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization have shaped North American cities over the past two centuries. Major themes include economic geography, ecology, labor and production, suburbanization, outsourcing, energy, and cities' place in the world economy. The class will take regular walking tours of Philadelphia neighborhoods.
Course number only
209
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST455 - RISK AND SOCIETY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST455 - RISK AND SOCIETY
Term
2015C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST455402
Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
MEYERSON HALL B4
Instructors
WIGGINS, BENJAMIN
Course number only
455
Cross listings
PPE 475402
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST255 - THINKING ABOUT CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST255 - THINKING ABOUT CAPITALISM
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST255401
Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 402
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Course number only
255
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST412 - The Middle East in the World Economy

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST412 - The Middle East in the World Economy
Term
2015C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST412601
Meeting times
T 0600PM-0900PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 305
Instructors
SCHAD, GEOFFREY
Course number only
412
Use local description
No
LPS Course
true
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST440401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
W 0530PM-0830PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 285
Instructors
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Description
Orientation to the profession, tracing the evolution of city and regional planning from its late nineteenth century roots to its twentieth century expression. Field trips included.
Course number only
440
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST107001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
EDUCATION BUILDING 200
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST131 - Financial Meltdown, Past and Present

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Financial Meltdown, Past and Present
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST131401
Course number integer
131
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Marc Flandreau
Description
Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.
Course number only
131
Cross listings
ECON028401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST119001
Meeting times
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Meeting location
ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Over the last two centuries, the modern corporation has emerged as the dominant form of doing business throughout the world. As such, it not only effects people's daily lives, but also influences government policies and larger trends in society. This course looks at the history of the international corporation from the industrial revolution to the present, to consider how corporations have evolved and the varying ways in which they have influenced the history of our times. We will consider the fundamental debates surrounding the responsibility between shareholders, managers, workers, customers, and most importantly, society as a whole. Much of the course will involve an examination of case studies of individual companies, industries or issues, to understand how corporations have functioned in specific instances.
Course number only
119
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST153 - Transformations of Urban America: Making the Unequal Metropolis, 1945-Today

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Transformations of Urban America: Making the Unequal Metropolis, 1945-Today
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST153401
Course number integer
153
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Randall B. Cebul
Description
The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization and stark inequality of cities in recent years.
Course number only
153
Cross listings
URBS104401
Fulfills
Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC
Term
2016A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST372401
Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
CASSANELLI, LEE
Description
This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.
Course number only
372
Cross listings
AFST372401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST107001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST174 - Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Course number integer
174
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Amy C. Offner
Description
From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, socialism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How did US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Fulfills
History & Tradition Sector
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST156 - HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST156 - HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST156401
Meeting times
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 215
Instructors
CHAUDHRY, FAISAL
Description
A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings until the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism,Christianity, and Islam.
Course number only
156
Cross listings
SAST166401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST119001
Meeting times
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Over the last two centuries, the modern corporation has emerged as the dominant form of doing business throughout the world. As such, it not only effects people's daily lives, but also influences government policies and larger trends in society. This course looks at the history of the international corporation from the industrial revolution to the present, to consider how corporations have evolved and the varying ways in which they have influenced the history of our times. We will consider the fundamental debates surrounding the responsibility between shareholders, managers, workers, customers, and most importantly, society as a whole. Much of the course will involve an examination of case studies of individual companies, industries or issues, to understand how corporations have functioned in specific instances.
Course number only
119
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST175 - History of Brazil

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
History of Brazil
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Course number integer
175
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Melissa Teixeira
Description
In the past decade, Brazil has emerged a leading global power. As the world's fifth-largest country, by size and population, and the ninth-largest by GDP, Brazil exerts tremendous influence on international politics and the global economy, seen in its position as an emerging BRIC nation and a regional heavyweight in South America. Brazil is often in the news for its strides in social welfare, leading investments in the Global South, as host of the World Cup and Olympics, and, most recently, for its political instability. It is also a nation of deep contradictions, in which myth of racial democracy -- the longstanding creed that Brazilian society has escaped racial discrimination -- functions alongside pervasive social inequality, state violence, political corruption, and an unforgiving penal system. This course examines six centuries of Brazilian history. It highlights the interplay between global events -- colonialism, slavery and emancipation, capitalism, and democratization -- and the local geographies, popular cultures, and social movements that have shaped this multi-ethnic and expansive nation. In particular, the readings will highlight Brazil's place in Latin America and the Lusophone World, as well as the ways in which Brazil stands as a counterpoint to the United States, especially in terms of the legacy of slavery and race relation. In this lecture, we will also follow the current political and economic crises unfolding in Brazil, at a moment when it has become all the more important to evaluate just how South America's largest nation has shaped and been shaped by global events.
Course number only
175
Cross listings
LALS175401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM
Term
2016C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST161401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0100PM-0200PM
Meeting location
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402
Instructors
LICHT, WALTER
Description
A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: colonial trade patterns, the growth of the market economy, the political economy of slavery, industrial expansion, segmentation in the labor force and changes in work, technological and organizational innovations, business cycles, the rise of the corporate welfare state, the growth of monopoly capitalism, and current economic problems in historical perspective.
Course number only
161
Cross listings
ECON014401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST153401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
STITELER HALL B26
Instructors
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Description
The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization of cities in recent years.
Course number only
153
Cross listings
URBS104401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST234 - Decades of Extremes: Protectionism, Fascism, Imperialism, 1917-1945

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Decades of Extremes: Protectionism, Fascism, Imperialism, 1917-1945
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST234301
Course number integer
234
Meeting times
M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Melissa Teixeira
Description
The rise of Fascism in Italy, the Russian Revolution, anti-colonial struggles in India, the New Deal in the United States, the Spanish Civil War, and the emergence of populist Juan Perón in Argentina. These events – as distinct as they are – all responded to the crisis of the global economy following World War I. These were decades of ideological extremes: liberal democracy pitted against fascism, socialism versus capitalism, imperialist expansion in some parts of the world and struggles for self-determination in others. What did the world look like in 1917, and why did it give rise to such revolutionary politics? This course studies the ideological conflicts and economic crises of the interwar decades (1917-1945) through firsthand accounts produced by intellectuals, economists, dictators, and ordinary citizens. We will read from the 1917 Soviet Constitution, George Orwell’s personal account of the Spanish Civil War, and Mussolini’s writings to understand the revolutionary visions at stake. We will debate alongside John M. Keynes and Friedrich Hayek to engage one of the driving questions to arise in these years: what is the role of the state in economic life? We explore the policy experimentation that arose in response to this crippling economic situation, from the New Deal in the United States to the rise of populism in Latin America. Finally, we consider how these interwar struggles explain the outbreak of World War II, an extreme experience of totalitarianism, destruction, and genocide. The key concepts we explore – fascism, imperialism, protectionism, capitalism, socialism, authoritarianism, liberalism – are of enduring relevance. What lessons – if any – can we learn from these interwar decades of extremes?
Course number only
234
Use local description
Yes
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST202 - MAJOR SEM EUR POST-1800: CLASSICAL ECONOMISTS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST202 - MAJOR SEM EUR POST-1800: CLASSICAL ECONOMISTS
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST202301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
STEINBERG, JONATHAN
Course number only
202
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM
Term
2014A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST161401
Registration notes

SOCIETY SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5
Instructors
LICHT, WALTER
Description
A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: colonial trade patterns, the growth of the market economy, the political economy of slavery, industrial expansion, segmentation in the labor force and changes in work, technological and organizational innovations, business cycles, the rise of the corporate welfare state, the growth of monopoly capitalism, and current economic problems in historical perspective.
Course number only
161
Cross listings
ECON014401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST440 - Perspectives On Urban Poverty

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Perspectives On Urban Poverty
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST440401
Course number integer
440
Meeting times
W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Robert P Fairbanks
Description
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions.
Course number only
440
Cross listings
SOCI420401, URBS420401
Fulfills
College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Cultural Diversity in the US
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST206 - MAJ SEM WORLD AFT 1800: HISTORY OF TRADE

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - MAJ SEM WORLD AFT 1800: HISTORY OF TRADE
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST206301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
R 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 311A
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST204 - MAJOR SEM AMER POST-1800: WORK& WORKERS IN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST204 - MAJOR SEM AMER POST-1800: WORK& WORKERS IN AMERICA
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST204301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
Instructors
LICHT, WALTER
Course number only
204
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST209401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 110
Instructors
VITIELLO, DOMENIC
Description
Although most U.S. cities are no longer thought of as "industrial cities," metropolitan areas today are all products of industrial economies, technologies, and social systems. This course explores the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization have shaped North American cities over the past two centuries. Major themes include economic geography, ecology, labor and production, suburbanization, outsourcing, energy, and cities' place in the world economy. The class will take regular walking tours of Philadelphia neighborhoods.
Course number only
209
Cross listings
URBS103401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST212 - CLASSICAL LIBERAL THGHT

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST212 - CLASSICAL LIBERAL THGHT
Term
2014A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST212301
Registration notes

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

Meeting times
T 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 452
Instructors
KORS, ALAN
Course number only
212
Use local description
No
Section Type
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST412 - The Middle East in the World Economy

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST412 - The Middle East in the World Economy
Term
2016C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST412601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
T 0600PM-0900PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 305
Instructors
SCHAD, GEOFFREY
Course number only
412
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC

Status
X
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST372401
Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
CASSANELLI, LEE
Description
This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.
Course number only
372
Cross listings
AFST372401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST440401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
W 0530PM-0830PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
Instructors
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Description
Orientation to the profession, tracing the evolution of city and regional planning from its late nineteenth century roots to its twentieth century expression. Field trips included.
Course number only
440
Cross listings
SOCI420401 URBS420401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST123 - ECONOMIC HIST OF EURO I

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST123 - ECONOMIC HIST OF EURO I
Term
2014C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST123001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111
Instructors
SAFLEY, THOMAS
Description
This course concentrates on the economy of Europe in the Early Modern Period, 1450-1750. It was a time of great transition. Europe developed from an agriculturally-based to an industrially-based economy, with attendant changes in society and culture. From subsistence-level productivity, the European economy expanded to create great surfeits of goods, with attendant changes in consumption and expectation. Europe grew from a regional economic system to become part--some would say the heart--of a global economy, with attendant changes in worldview and identity. Economic intensification, expansion, globalization, and industrialization are our topics, therefore. Beginning with economic organizations and practices, we will consider how these changed over time and influenced society and culture. The course takes as its point of departure the experience of individual, working men and women: peasants and artisans, merchants and landlords, entrepeneurs and financiers. Yet, it argues outward: from the particular to the general, from the individual to the social, from the local to the global. It will suggest ways in which the economy influenced developments or changes that were not in themselves economic, shaped, and deflected economic life and practice.
Course number only
123
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST107001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
EDUCATION BUILDING 203
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS
Term
2014C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST130 - HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST130 - HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST130001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Globalization seems the essence of modernity, but it is not a new phenomena. The world has already witnessed several eras of globalization, each of which transformed and changed the world in often similar but sometime unique fashions. This course will look at continuing trends towards globalization and consider its rich history and the contentious arguments that it has always provoked. Although the focus of the course will be on globalization during the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also consider earlier episodes of globalization, to fully appreciate its evolution and importance.
Course number only
130
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST206 - CAPITALIST ENTERPRISE IN MODERN JAPAN

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - CAPITALIST ENTERPRISE IN MODERN JAPAN
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST206301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
CHOI, JAMYUNG
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST153401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 286-7
Instructors
GILLETTE, HOWARD
Description
The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization of cities in recent years.
Course number only
153
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST209 - INDUSTRIAL METROPOLIS
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST209401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 110
Instructors
VITIELLO, DOMENIC
Description
Although most U.S. cities are no longer thought of as "industrial cities," metropolitan areas today are all products of industrial economies, technologies, and social systems. This course explores the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization have shaped North American cities over the past two centuries. Major themes include economic geography, ecology, labor and production, suburbanization, outsourcing, energy, and cities' place in the world economy. The class will take regular walking tours of Philadelphia neighborhoods.
Course number only
209
Cross listings
URBS103401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST204 - WORK& WORKERS IN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST204 - WORK& WORKERS IN AMERICA
Term
2017A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST204301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
LICHT, WALTER
Course number only
204
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST212 - CLASSICAL LIBERAL THGHT

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST212 - CLASSICAL LIBERAL THGHT
Term
2014C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST212301
Registration notes

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

Meeting times
T 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 302
Instructors
KORS, ALAN
Course number only
212
Use local description
No
Section Type
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST131 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN, PAST AND PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST131 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN, PAST AND PRESENT
Term
2017C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST131401
Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
STITELER HALL B21
Instructors
FLANDREAU, MARC
Description
Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.
Course number only
131
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST206 - TRADE,TRAVEL&EXPLORATION

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - TRADE,TRAVEL&EXPLORATION
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST206302
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
R 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 302
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 116
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST107001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
TR 0300PM-0430PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST206 - MAJ SEM WORLD AFT 1800: HISTORY OF TRADE

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - MAJ SEM WORLD AFT 1800: HISTORY OF TRADE
Term
2017C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST206301
Registration notes

MAJORS ONLY

Meeting times
T 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST130 - HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST130 - HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST130001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Globalization seems the essence of modernity, but it is not a new phenomena. The world has already witnessed several eras of globalization, each of which transformed and changed the world in often similar but sometime unique fashions. This course will look at continuing trends towards globalization and consider its rich history and the contentious arguments that it has always provoked. Although the focus of the course will be on globalization during the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also consider earlier episodes of globalization, to fully appreciate its evolution and importance.
Course number only
130
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST206 - TRAVEL, TRADE AND WAR IN THE MODERN MEDITERRANEAN

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - TRAVEL, TRADE AND WAR IN THE MODERN MEDITERRANEAN
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST206302
Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4N30
Instructors
CHASE-LEVENSON, ALEXANDER
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST153 - THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN AMERICA
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST153401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Description
The course traces the economic, social, and political history of American cities after World War II. It focuses on how the economic problems of the industrial city were compounded by the racial conflicts of the 1950s and 1960s and the fiscal crises of the 1970s. The last part of the course examines the forces that have led to the revitalization of cities in recent years.
Course number only
153
Cross listings
URBS104401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST206 - THINKING ABT CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST206 - THINKING ABT CAPITALISM
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
303
Section ID
HIST206303
Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Course number only
206
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST161 - AMERICAN CAPITALISM
Term
2015A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST161401
Registration notes

SOCIETY SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419
Instructors
LICHT, WALTER
Description
A broad overview of American economic history will be provided by focusing on the following topics: colonial trade patterns, the growth of the market economy, the political economy of slavery, industrial expansion, segmentation in the labor force and changes in work, technological and organizational innovations, business cycles, the rise of the corporate welfare state, the growth of monopoly capitalism, and current economic problems in historical perspective.
Course number only
161
Cross listings
ECON014401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST440 - PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN POVERTY
Term
2017C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST440401
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR

Meeting times
W 0530PM-0830PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 285
Instructors
FAIRBANKS, ROBERT
Description
Orientation to the profession, tracing the evolution of city and regional planning from its late nineteenth century roots to its twentieth century expression. Field trips included.
Course number only
440
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST212 - CLASSICAL ECONOMISTS FROM SMITH TO KEYNES

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST212 - CLASSICAL ECONOMISTS FROM SMITH TO KEYNES
Term
2015A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST212302
Registration notes

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
STEINBERG, JONATHAN
Course number only
212
Use local description
No
Section Type
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR;
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST130 - History of Globalization: The Origins of the State and Economy

Status
X
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST130 - History of Globalization: The Origins of the State and Economy
Term
2017C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST130601
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
FEYGIN, YAKOV
Description
Globalization seems the essence of modernity, but it is not a new phenomena. The world has already witnessed several eras of globalization, each of which transformed and changed the world in often similar but sometime unique fashions. This course will look at continuing trends towards globalization and consider its rich history and the contentious arguments that it has always provoked. Although the focus of the course will be on globalization during the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also consider earlier episodes of globalization, to fully appreciate its evolution and importance.
Course number only
130
Use local description
No
LPS Course
true
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST270 - AGRARIAN QUEST IN ASIA: The Agrarian Question in Asia: A Chapter in the History of Economic Thought

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST270 - AGRARIAN QUEST IN ASIA: The Agrarian Question in Asia: A Chapter in the History of Economic Thought
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST270401
Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 201
Instructors
CHAUDHRY, FAISAL
Description
In this course we will look at how the emerging relationship between "modern" industry, agriculture, and economic change has been understood and acted upon in the context of the two major agrarian empire zones of Asia that now comprise the countries of China and India. Today, it is in connection to recent processes of economic liberalization, globalization, and the post-Cold War "triumph of capitalism" that the vast changes transpiring in these areas of the world are most typically discussed. However, the anticipation of the imminent "great transformation" of these parts of the world has a much longer history. As such, it has proven both constitutive of the processes of actual transformation that have been unfolding in these parts of the world since (at least) the second half of the nineteenth century and representative of the multifarious idioms that have historically gone into the making of knowledge about the economic. To Asian subalterns and to the West's high theoretical exponents of classical political economy, to metropolitan romantics and to incipient "third world" nationalists, to the early 20th-century's increasingly "scientific" economicsts and to its revolutionaries--to one and all the agrarian question in Asia was crucial. For us, it will be the entry point into thinking about the making of economics and the economy in a time before a Post-War era in which each would increasingly become the reflection of the other through a seemingly self-evident relation between object and inquiry and between diagnosing underdevelopment and desireing growth.
Course number only
270
Cross listings
HIST570401 SAST270401 SAST570401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST107001
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
EDUCATION BUILDING 203
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST372 - HIST FOREIGN AID IN AFRC
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST372401
Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 318
Instructors
CASSANELLI, LEE
Description
This course examines the history, politics, and significance of foreign aid to Africa since the late 19th century. While we do not typically think about the European colonial period in Africa in terms of 'foreign aid,' that era introduced ideas and institutions which formed the foundations for modern aid policies and practices. So we start there and move forward into more contemporary times. In addition to examining the objectives behind foreign assistance and the intentions of donors and recipients, we will look at some of the consequences (intended or unintended) of various forms of foreign aid to Africa over the past century. While not designed to be a comprehensive history of development theory, of African economics, or of international aid organizations, the course will touch on all of these topics. Previous course work on Africa is strongly advised.
Course number only
372
Cross listings
AFST372401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST119 - HIST OF MOD BUS. CORP
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
001
Section ID
HIST119001
Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 285
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
Over the last two centuries, the modern corporation has emerged as the dominant form of doing business throughout the world. As such, it not only effects people's daily lives, but also influences government policies and larger trends in society. This course looks at the history of the international corporation from the industrial revolution to the present, to consider how corporations have evolved and the varying ways in which they have influenced the history of our times. We will consider the fundamental debates surrounding the responsibility between shareholders, managers, workers, customers, and most importantly, society as a whole. Much of the course will involve an examination of case studies of individual companies, industries or issues, to understand how corporations have functioned in specific instances.
Course number only
119
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST107 - COMP CAPITALIST SYSTEMS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST107301
Registration notes

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FOR HUNTSMAN STUDENTS ONLY; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO

Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201
Instructors
DREW, JERRY
Description
The course follows the evolution of industrial capitalism since the beginning of the English industrial revolution in the late 18th century. It ranges from the problems of the industrial revolution in England to problems of building a market economy in eastern Europe today. In particular, it examines industrialization and explores the sources of sustained economic growth from a comparative perspective. Most of the world, especially in so-called emerging economies, is still confronted with the challenge, and often pain, of creating a modern industrial capitalist society. The course attempts to build a conceptual apparatus for understanding models of industrialization and is built around issues such as law, anti-trust, corporate forms, banking institutions, industrial relations, etc. By definition, the course tends to concentrate on successful industrializers around the world, but questions regarding continuing underdevelopment will be addressed.
Course number only
107
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations

HIST234 - CAPITALISM AND HUMANITARIANISM

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST234 - CAPITALISM AND HUMANITARIANISM
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST234301
Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
Instructors
FLANDREAU, MARC
Course number only
234
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled