Latin America/Caribbean

HIST436 - Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST436401
Course number integer
436
Meeting times
M 09:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Grace L. Sanders Johnson
Description
On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for
Course number only
436
Cross listings
AFRC436401, GSWS436401, LALS437401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - UNOFFICIAL HISTORIES OF THE COLONIAL CARIBBEAN

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - UNOFFICIAL HISTORIES OF THE COLONIAL CARIBBEAN
Term
2016C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 302
Instructors
FABELLA, YVONNE
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
AFRC234401 LALS233401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - MODERN MEXICAN SOCIETY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - MODERN MEXICAN SOCIETY
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST233601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
MW 0630PM-0800PM
Meeting location
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203
Instructors
LOMBERA, JUAN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS431601 SOCI431601
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST071401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0900AM-1030AM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.
Course number only
071
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1791-PRES

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1791-PRES
Term
2014A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST071401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 1000AM-1100AM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A2
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.
Course number only
071
Cross listings
LALS071401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Meeting times
M 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 318
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - BRAZIL: LAND OF THE FUTURE?

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - BRAZIL: LAND OF THE FUTURE?
Term
2017A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 311A
Instructors
SQUARE, JONATHAN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST175 - SOCIETY & CULT IN BRAZIL

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST175 - SOCIETY & CULT IN BRAZIL
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Instructors
WALKER, TAMARA
Course number only
175
Cross listings
AFRC175401 LALS175401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Term
2017C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0900AM-1030AM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
This course provides an introduction to the broad litwerature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?
Course number only
070
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA
Term
2014A
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 217
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 116
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - Colonialism and Revolt in Cuba

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - Colonialism and Revolt in Cuba
Term
2014A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST233601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
W 0500PM-0800PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 318
Instructors
GILLINGHAM, PAUL
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233601
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - ORAL HISTORY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - ORAL HISTORY
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Meeting times
F 0100PM-0400PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Term
2014C
Syllabus
walker.pdf49.25 KB
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 1200PM-0100PM
Meeting location
STITELER HALL B26
Instructors
WALKER, TAMARA
Description
This course provides an introduction to the broad litwerature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?
Course number only
070
Cross listings
AFRC070401 LALS070401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - UNOFFICIAL HISTORIES OF THE COLONIAL CARIBBEAN

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - UNOFFICIAL HISTORIES OF THE COLONIAL CARIBBEAN
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 302
Instructors
FABELLA, YVONNE
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS
Term
2014C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Meeting times
MW 0200PM-0330PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - DEATH IN THE AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - DEATH IN THE AMERICAS
Term
2017C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
403
Section ID
HIST233403
Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
EDUCATION BUILDING 008
Instructors
HEANEY, CHRISTOPHER
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST179401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
FEROS, ANTONIO
Description
This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."
Course number only
179
Cross listings
LALS179401 ROML250401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST071401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING 111
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.
Course number only
071
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST179401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 1000AM-1100AM
Meeting location
ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111
Instructors
FEROS, ANTONIO
Description
This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."
Course number only
179
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FRENCH & HAITIAN REVOLUTIONS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FRENCH & HAITIAN REVOLUTIONS
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 402
Instructors
FABELLA, YVONNE
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233402
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FEMINISM IN THE AMERICAS
Term
2018A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Meeting times
M 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - CARTOONS & POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - CARTOONS & POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
403
Section ID
HIST233403
Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
GILLINGHAM, PAUL
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233403
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - People and Power in Modern Mexico

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - People and Power in Modern Mexico
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST233601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
MW 0630PM-0800PM
Meeting location
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203
Instructors
LOMBERA, JUAN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
SOCI431601
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
true
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0100PM-0200PM
Meeting location
STITELER HALL B21
Instructors
NORTON, MARCY
Description
This course provides an introduction to the broad litwerature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?
Course number only
070
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST353 - SLAVERY,RACE &REVOLUTION

Status
X
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST353 - SLAVERY,RACE &REVOLUTION
Term
2014C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST353401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED

Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
HAHN, STEVEN
Description
This course will explore the role of peoples of African descent in the making and transformation of the Atlantic world between the revolutionary era of the late 18th century, which saw the establishment of the first black republic in the Western Hemisphere, and the early decades of the 20th century, when a new pan-African consciousness emerged. We will look at the roles that slavery and the slave trade played in marking the boundaries of a black Atlantic, and we will pay special attention to the part that people of African descent played both in struggles against slavery in the Americas and in the struggles to define the meanings of freedom and peoplehood there and elsewhere.
Course number only
353
Cross listings
AFRC353401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST072401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 0900AM-1030AM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 318
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.
Course number only
072
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1791-PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1791-PRESENT
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST071401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
ARTS, RSRCH & CULTR - 3601 LO 208
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.
Course number only
071
Cross listings
LALS071401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST106 - COCA AND COCAINE

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST106 - COCA AND COCAINE
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST106401
Registration notes

FRESHMAN SEMINAR

Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 217
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Course number only
106
Use local description
No
Section Type
FRESHMAN SEMINAR;
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST175 - SOCIETY & CULT IN BRAZIL

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST175 - SOCIETY & CULT IN BRAZIL
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231
Instructors
WALKER, TAMARA
Course number only
175
Cross listings
AFRC175401 LALS175401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, & CRISIS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAS
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 116
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FASHION & IMAGE IN THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FASHION & IMAGE IN THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
Term
2015A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
Instructors
WALKER, TAMARA
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
AFRC234401 LALS233401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST175 - HISTORY OF BRAZIL

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST175 - HISTORY OF BRAZIL
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 0130PM-0300PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 314
Instructors
TEIXEIRA, MELISSA
Course number only
175
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0100PM-0200PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401
Instructors
FORDE, JAMIE
Description
This course provides an introduction to the broad litwerature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?
Course number only
070
Cross listings
AFRC070401 LALS070401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST234 - ABOLITIONISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST234 - ABOLITIONISM: A GLOBAL HISTORY
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST234401
Meeting times
M 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 305
Instructors
FERREIRA, ROQUINALDO
Course number only
234
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST072401
Meeting times
TR 0900AM-1030AM
Meeting location
MCNEIL BUILDING 409
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.
Course number only
072
Cross listings
LALS072401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST248 - HAITIAN REVOLUTION

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST248 - HAITIAN REVOLUTION
Term
2018C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST248401
Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
FABELLA, YVONNE
Description
In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the abolition of racial discrimination and slavery throughout the French Empire. When Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence, declaring Haiti the world's first "Black Republic" in 1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and points of connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue: how did increasingly radical ideas in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents and their leaders? And how, in turn, did revolution in the Caribbean impact the revolution in France? Finally, we will ask how the Haitian Revolution influenced ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic World. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. A final research paper will be required of all students.
Course number only
248
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST106 - LATIN AMERICA IN THE ARTISTIC IMAGINATION

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST106 - LATIN AMERICA IN THE ARTISTIC IMAGINATION
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST106401
Registration notes

FRESHMAN SEMINAR

Meeting times
CANCELED
Instructors
WALKER, TAMARA
Course number only
106
Cross listings
LALS107401
Use local description
No
Section Type
FRESHMAN SEMINAR;
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST412 - People and Power in Modern Mexico

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST412 - People and Power in Modern Mexico
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST412601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
TR 0530PM-0700PM
Meeting location
JAFFE BUILDING 113
Instructors
LOMBERA, JUAN
Course number only
412
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST174 - REFORM & REV IN AMERICAS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0330PM-0500PM
Meeting location
WILLIAMS HALL 1
Instructors
OFFNER, AMY
Description
The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the postwar period. This course examines efforts in the United States, Guatemala, Cuba, and Brazil to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class invites students to explore central themes of both regions' histories as parts of global processes. We will explore exchanges between social movements in the US, Cuba and Africa, for instance, ask how ideas about poverty traversed national borders, and examine the global rise of human rights consciousness. The class, in other words, not only compares national histories but analyzes the relationships between national upheavals and the global significance of events in the hemisphere.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST436 - LOVE,ANGER,MADNESS: Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST436 - LOVE,ANGER,MADNESS: Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST436401
Meeting times
R 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141
Instructors
JOHNSON, GRACE
Description
On the stage of modern world history, Haiti plays the unique role as both the exceptionally victorious and tragic character. This course interrogates archival documents, oral histories, historical texts, and prose created within the nation and her diaspora in order to establish a nuanced image of the projection of Haiti's modern history. Using two classic Haitian texts, Marie Vieux-Chauvet's Love, Anger, Madness (1968) and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (1995),this course examines how, why,and to what end Haiti's history and popular narratives about the country have served to construct and dismantle global movements, popular culture, and meanings of race, gender, and citizenship in the Americas. In our historical examination, we will question some of the iconic representations of Haiti through literature that deepen the affective historical profile of Haiti with interrogations of culture, sexuality, political, and media performance. Students will become familiar with the post -colonial history of Haiti and the region, meanings of race, and the production of history. The course is a research and historical methods seminar. Students will conduct archival research and write narratives from primary source material. This course qualifies as a "methods" course for
Course number only
436
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST179401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
FEROS, ANTONIO
Description
This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."
Course number only
179
Cross listings
LALS179401 ROML250401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - Colonial Spanish Borderlands, from the Floridas to the Californias
Term
2018C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Registration notes

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US

Meeting times
R 0300PM-0600PM
Meeting location
MEYERSON HALL B7
Instructors
GALLMAN, NANCY
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Use local description
No
Section Type
CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FRENCH & HAITIAN REVOLUTIONS

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FRENCH & HAITIAN REVOLUTIONS
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
W 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
VAN PELT LIBRARY 402
Instructors
FABELLA, YVONNE
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
AFRC234402 LALS233402
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - Colonial Latin America

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Colonial Latin America
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Course number integer
70
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Meeting times
MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Marcy Norton
Description
The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships.
Course number only
070
Cross listings
LALS070401
Fulfills
History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - FROM COCA TO COCAINE

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - FROM COCA TO COCAINE
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
403
Section ID
HIST233403
Meeting times
T 0130PM-0430PM
Meeting location
MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233403
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST072 - Intro Lat Am & Latino St

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Intro Lat Am & Latino St
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST072401
Course number integer
72
Meeting times
MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear
Description
Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.
Course number only
072
Cross listings
LALS072401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - MODERN MEXICAN SOCIETY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - MODERN MEXICAN SOCIETY
Term
2015C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
601
Section ID
HIST233601
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

Meeting times
MW 0630PM-0800PM
Meeting location
CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203
Instructors
LOMBERA, JUAN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
SOCI431601
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
true
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST174 - Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST174401
Course number integer
174
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Amy C. Offner
Description
From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, socialism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How did US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required.
Course number only
174
Cross listings
LALS174401
Fulfills
History & Tradition Sector
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1782-PRESENT
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST071401
Registration notes

CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history from the Haitian Revolution of 1791 to the present. We will examine the legacy of Spanish colonialism and slavery, movements for national and cultural independence, twentieth-century radicalism, and the politics of race in contemporary Latin America. Readings include fictional as well as analytical representations, and a film series will accompany the course.
Course number only
071
Cross listings
LALS071401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST175 - History of Brazil

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
History of Brazil
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST175401
Course number integer
175
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Melissa Teixeira
Description
In the past decade, Brazil has emerged a leading global power. As the world's fifth-largest country, by size and population, and the ninth-largest by GDP, Brazil exerts tremendous influence on international politics and the global economy, seen in its position as an emerging BRIC nation and a regional heavyweight in South America. Brazil is often in the news for its strides in social welfare, leading investments in the Global South, as host of the World Cup and Olympics, and, most recently, for its political instability. It is also a nation of deep contradictions, in which myth of racial democracy -- the longstanding creed that Brazilian society has escaped racial discrimination -- functions alongside pervasive social inequality, state violence, political corruption, and an unforgiving penal system. This course examines six centuries of Brazilian history. It highlights the interplay between global events -- colonialism, slavery and emancipation, capitalism, and democratization -- and the local geographies, popular cultures, and social movements that have shaped this multi-ethnic and expansive nation. In particular, the readings will highlight Brazil's place in Latin America and the Lusophone World, as well as the ways in which Brazil stands as a counterpoint to the United States, especially in terms of the legacy of slavery and race relation. In this lecture, we will also follow the current political and economic crises unfolding in Brazil, at a moment when it has become all the more important to evaluate just how South America's largest nation has shaped and been shaped by global events.
Course number only
175
Cross listings
LALS175401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST178 - EARLY MOD ATLANTIC WORLD

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST178 - EARLY MOD ATLANTIC WORLD
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST178401
Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
FEROS, ANTONIO
Description
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of Atlantic history during the early modern period (XV-XVIII centuries). Through readings of primary and secondary texts we will discuss the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic developments of Europe, Africa, and the Americas, as well as the connections, struggles, and mutual influences between the peoples of these three continents. Throughout the semester we will study several important topics: medieval precedents of early modern expansion; theories of empire; ideologies and systems of conquest and colonialization; the relevance of race and slavery to the understanding of the early modern Atlantic world; how different peoples perceived others and themselves; how European imperialism and colonialization affected the internal development of Africa and America; the role played by religion in the Atlantic world; persistence and continuity of Native cultures and beliefs during an age of expansion; the creation of new identities; the role played by African nations in the creation of the Atlantic world; and the creation of an Atlantic economy.
Course number only
178
Cross listings
LALS178401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - Feminism in the Americas

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Feminism in the Americas
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST233401
Course number integer
233
Meeting times
R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear
Description
Students in this seminar will choose their own research topic in the history of feminism. With guidance and support each person will produce a twenty-page paper based on intensive work with primary sources. Readings will range across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. We’ll take a long view, beginning in the sixteenth century, and use an expansive frame. Our purpose will not be to decide who was or wasn’t ‘a feminist’ but instead to try to understand actors within their contexts. Readings include scholarship on Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Sojourner Truth, the struggle for voting rights across national lines, opposition to dictatorship, and organizing against racism and homophobia. *For History Majors and Minors: Geographic requirement fulfilled by this seminar is dependent on research paper topic.
Course number only
233
Cross listings
AFRC234401, GSWS233401, LALS233401
Use local description
Yes
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - ORAL HISTORY

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Title (text only)
HIST233 - ORAL HISTORY
Term
2016A
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
404
Section ID
HIST233404
Meeting times
M 0200PM-0500PM
Meeting location
COLLEGE HALL 315A
Instructors
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Description
Topics Vary
Course number only
233
Cross listings
GSWS233404 LALS233404
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - Indigenous History of Mexico From the Aztecs To Present

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
402
Title (text only)
Indigenous History of Mexico From the Aztecs To Present
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST233402
Course number integer
233
Meeting times
W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Marcy Norton
Description
This course will explore the history of indigenous peoples of Mexico from roughly 1400 to the present. Mesoamerica – the cultural region that encompassed what is today Mexico and much of Central America – in the fifteenth century saw the ascendance of the Aztec Empire in central Mexico (and beyond) and the continued independence of numerous Mayan communities. We will begin by looking at a diverse range of sources produced by the linguistically diverse people in these areas, particularly focusing on the “codices,” as the painted deer hide books that recorded history and ritual knowledge are known. Reading sources (in translation) by both European and indigenous languages (primarily Spanish, Nahuatl, and Maya), we will look at the divergent ways that Native communities and individuals responded to Spanish wars of conquest and how they responded to colonialism. The final part of the will look at the impact of Mexican independence and Revolution in the nineteenth century through the present, as well as the ongoing indigenous Mesoamerican diaspora to locales throughout the United States. In addition to written primary and secondary sources, we will consider a diverse array of visual sources – taking advantage of the spectacular holdings of the Penn museum – and contemporary cinema.
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233402
Fulfills
Cultural Diversity in the US
Use local description
Yes
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST070 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST070401
Registration notes

SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
MW 0100PM-0200PM
Meeting location
MUSIC BUILDING 101
Instructors
SQUARE, JONATHAN
Description
This course provides an introduction to the broad litwerature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy?
Course number only
070
Cross listings
AFRC070401 LALS070401
Use local description
No
Section Type
CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST233 - Piracy and the Law in the Atlantic World, 1560-1850

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
403
Title (text only)
Piracy and the Law in the Atlantic World, 1560-1850
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
403
Section ID
HIST233403
Course number integer
233
Meeting times
T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Casey Schmitt
Description
From Jack Sparrow to Captain Morgan, pirates are a celebrated part of American popular culture. But, before Hollywood romanticized peg legs, eye patches, and rum, early modern mariners lived short and often brutal lives struggling against the changing crosswinds of prevailing European power structures. Despite popular conceptions of pirates, defining who constituted a pirate and what acts could be considered piratical was complicated and shifted over time. This course uses piracy as a lens onto the construction of power, the law, and the early modern state from 1450 through 1800. We will explore the concept of piracy as both a complex social function and as a political statement among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans. Our readings will address topics such as the creation of legal and illegal maritime activity, piracy and the development of international law, the challenges posed by piracy to gender norms, the use of race as a method of inclusion and exclusion among pirate crews, and how public memory of piracy shapes current debates about global economics.
Course number only
233
Cross listings
LALS233403
Use local description
Yes
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST072 - INTRO LAT AM & LATINO ST
Term
2016C
Syllabus
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST072401
Meeting times
TR 1200PM-0130PM
Meeting location
MEYERSON HALL B4
Instructors
HEANEY, CHRISTOPHER
Description
Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation.
Course number only
072
Cross listings
LALS072401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST248 - Haitian Revolution

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Haitian Revolution
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST248401
Course number integer
248
Meeting times
R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Yvonne Fabella
Description
In August 1791, enslaved Africans on the northern plain of Saint Domingue (colonial Haiti) rose up in a coordinated attack against their French colonial masters, launching the initial revolt in what would come to be known as the Haitian Revolution. In the years that followed, their actions forced the abolition of racial discrimination and slavery throughout the French Empire. When Napoleon Bonaparte threatened to return slavery to Saint Domingue, they waged a war for independence, declaring Haiti the world's first "Black Republic" in 1804. This seminar will examine some of the major themes and debates surrounding Haiti's colonial and revolutionary history. We will begin by considering the colonial paradox: France's leading role in the intellectual movement called the "Enlightenment" coincided with its ascent as a slaveholding colonial power. The seminar will also explore parallels and points of connection between the revolutionary movements in France and Saint Domingue: how did increasingly radical ideas in France shape events in the Caribbean? Likewise, how did west African traditions and political ideologies influence insurgents and their leaders? And how, in turn, did revolution in the Caribbean impact the revolution in France? Finally, we will ask how the Haitian Revolution influenced ideas about liberty, sovereignty and freedom throughout the Atlantic World. We will read a combination of primary and secondary materials each week. A final research paper will be required of all students.
Course number only
248
Cross listings
LALS248401, AFRC248401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Title (text only)
HIST179 - RISE&FALL OF SPANISH EMP
Term
2016C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST179401
Registration notes

HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR

Meeting times
TR 1030AM-1200PM
Meeting location
CHEMISTRY BUILDING B13
Instructors
FEROS, ANTONIO
Description
This course will provide students with a solid knowledge of the history of early modern Spain (1450-1700). Through readings of primary and secondary texts that offer a complex vision of the cultural, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts and processes, students will be able to appreciate the intricacies of Spain's historical evolution. The course focuses on the rise and decline of the Spanish monarchy: the conditions that enabled Spain to become the most powerful monarchy in early modern times, and the conditions that led to its decline. This course also touches upon other important aspects critical to understanding early modern Spain: relationships among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula; the conquest and colonization of the New World; and early modern debates about Spain's rights to occupy America and the so-called "destruction of the Indies."
Course number only
179
Cross listings
LALS179401 ROML250401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled