HIST670 - Topics:Transregional His: State Formatn & Pol Econ

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
303
Title (text only)
Topics:Transregional His: State Formatn & Pol Econ
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
303
Section ID
HIST670303
Course number integer
670
Meeting times
R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Amy C. Offner
Description
Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History
Course number only
670
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false

HIST106 - Of Horses, Bows, & Fermented Milk: the Turkish Empires in 15 Objects

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
302
Title (text only)
Of Horses, Bows, & Fermented Milk: the Turkish Empires in 15 Objects
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
302
Section ID
HIST106302
Course number integer
106
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Oscar Aguirre Mandujano
Course number only
106
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST106 - Africa in World History

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Africa in World History
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST106301
Course number integer
106
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
Meeting times
MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Lee V Cassanelli
Course number only
106
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST104 - Why College?

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Why College?
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
301
Section ID
HIST104301
Course number integer
104
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
Meeting times
MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jonathan Lurie Zimmerman
Course number only
104
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST134 - Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
404
Title (text only)
Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
404
Section ID
HIST134404
Course number integer
134
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
Course number only
134
Cross listings
GRMN134404
Use local description
No

HIST134 - Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
403
Title (text only)
Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
403
Section ID
HIST134403
Course number integer
134
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
Course number only
134
Cross listings
GRMN134403
Use local description
No

HIST134 - Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
402
Title (text only)
Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide
Term
2019C
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
402
Section ID
HIST134402
Course number integer
134
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
Course number only
134
Cross listings
GRMN134402
Use local description
No

HIST134 - Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide
Term
2019C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
401
Section ID
HIST134401
Course number integer
134
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Meeting times
MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Anne K Berg
Description
Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
Course number only
134
Cross listings
GRMN134401
Use local description
No
LPS Course
false
Major Concentrations
Major/Minor Requirements Fulfilled

HIST560 - Mla History Seminar: Religion and Politics in America

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
941
Title (text only)
Mla History Seminar: Religion and Politics in America
Term session
1
Term
2019B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
941
Section ID
HIST560941
Course number integer
560
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
Richard Scott Hanson
Course number only
560
Use local description
No

HIST117 - Science & Literature

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
Science & Literature
Term session
1
Term
2019B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
HIST
Section number only
910
Section ID
HIST117910
Course number integer
117
Meeting times
TR 01:15 PM-05:05 PM
Meeting location
COHN 237
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Alexis Rider
Description
Science fiction has become the mythology of modern technological civilization, providing vivid means for imagining (and proclaiming) the shape of things to come. This interdisciplinary seminar will consider SF in multiple manifestations -- literature, film and TV shows, visual art and architecture. We will debate how the genre has shaped ideas about scientific knowledge, the position of humans in the universe, and our possible futures by examining themes including time travel, robots and androids, alien encounters, extraterrestrial journeys, and the nature of intelligent life. This seminar will consider SF from the perspective of the history of science and technology: critically and comparatively, with a primary focus on social and cultural contexts in addition to literary aspects.
Course number only
117
Cross listings
ENGL075910, STSC110910, HSOC110910
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No