HIST071 - LATIN AMER 1791-PRES

Description: 
What has nationhood meant in 19th and 20th century Latin America? Colombians and Venezuelans lived through a devastatingly violent transition to independence. Brazilians experienced a constitutional monarchy that developed into a republican tradition embracing “Order and Progress,” the slogan emblazoned on their flag. Mexicans and Argentines emerged from the 19th century with social splits that then shaped political upheavals with implications for the region as a whole: the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1934 and the political storm that propelled Juan and Evita Perón to power. This course provides a regional overview that links the crises of the 1800s to the violence and deep inequalities of the 1900s. Throughout, we ask questions about sovereignty, foreign investment, and anti-imperialism. A focus on the cold war era, from Ché Guevara’s sojourns in Guatemala (before 1959) to the heady days of the 1960s, allows students to understand the ideological splits that resulted in the paradox of the 1970s-1980s, when “strong hand” methods enjoyed deep-seated support from key sectors even as journalists found proof of massacres, disappearances, and widespread torture. Today’s generation has seen dictators on trial, lists of disappeared persons, and—now—a former armed militant who has transformed herself into the first woman president of Brazil, even as Fidel Castro’s Cuba seems to outsiders to remain unchanged. Readings and assignments are structured to allow students access to direct historical evidence, with an emphasis on primary texts.
Instructors: 
FARNSWORTH-ALVEAR, ANN
Day and Time: 
MW 1000AM-1100AM
Room: 
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A2
Activity: 
LEC
Cross Listings: 
  • LALS071401
Registration Notes: 
SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR