Warren Breckman

Late and early modern European intellectual
Sheldon and Lucy Hackney Professor of History
College Hall 206 E
breckman@sas.upenn.edu
215 898.8518

Warren Breckman (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is the Sheldon and Lucy Hackney Professor of History, with a focus on modern European intellectual and cultural history at the University of Pennsylvania.  His books include Karl Marx, the Young Hegelians, and the Origins of Radical Social Theory: Dethroning the Self (Cambridge, 1999; paperback 2001),  European Romanticism: A Brief History wit

CV (file): 
Courses Taught: 

Undergraduate

“European Intellectual History, 1750-1870”

“European Intellectual History, 1870-1950”

“European Intellectual History, 1950-1990”

“The Great War in Memoir and Memory”

“French Thought Since 1945”

“Berlin im Zeitalter der Revolutionen, 1750-1848” (taught in German at the Free University, Berlin)

“Berliner Kultur zwischen Kaiserreich und Weimarer Republik, 1870-1933” (taught in German at the Free University, Berlin)

“Masters of Suspicion: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud”

“Religion, Society, and the Symbolic in Modern French Thought”

“European Romanticism”

“Politics and Intellectuals in the Twentieth Century”

“Theories of State and Society”

“Democracy and Dictatorship in European Thought”

“From Freud to Oprah:  The Rise and Fall of Psychoanalysis in Twentieth-Century Culture”

“Philosophy of History”

“Non-American History Honors Program”

 

Graduate

“Intellectuals and Politics in Modern Europe”

“Proseminar: Twentieth-Century European Intellectual and Cultural History”

“Proseminar: Nineteenth-Century European Intellectual and Cultural History”

“Politics and the Intellectual in Modern France”

“The Fate of the Self in Twentieth-Century Thought” 

Mary Frances Berry

U.S. constitutional and legal, African-American
Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, Professor of History
College Hall 216E
mfberry@sas.upenn.edu
215 898.9587

Mary Frances Berry has been a Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and Professor of History since 1987. She received her Ph.D. in History from the University of Michigan and JD from the University of Michigan Law School.

Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 168 U.S. Legal History to 1877
  • HIST 169 History of American Law Since 1877
  • HIST 204 History of Law and Social Policy
  • HIST 214 Law and Social Change in Modern America
  • HIST 668 History of Law and Social Policy

Cheikh Babou

Africa, Islam
Associate Professor of History
College Hall 306G
cheikh@sas.upenn.edu
215 898.2188

Cheikh Anta Babou is a historia

CV (file): 
Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 075 Africa before 1800
  • HIST 206 Decolonization & Africa
  • HIST 206 Religion and Colonial Rule in Africa
  • HIST 232 Immigrants and Refugees in African History
  • HIST 275 Islam and Society in America
  • HIST 650 Religious Encounters in Africa
  • HIST 560 African Immigrant Lives in West Philadelphia

Eiichiro Azuma

Asian American, Japanese American, Modern Japan, U.S. Immigration. and Race/Ethnic Relations
Alan Charles Kors Term Associate Professor of History
College Hall 311B
eazuma@history.upenn.edu
215 898.6698

Eiichiro Azuma is Alan Charles Kors Term Associate Professor of History

Courses Taught: 
• HIST 155: Introduction to Asian American History
• HIST 231: Wartime Internment of Japanese Americans
• HIST 354: American Expansion in the Pacific
• HIST 374: Diplomacy and Japanese American History

Ann E. Moyer

Renaissance Italy; European intellectual and cultural history
Associate Professor of History
Co-Executive Editor, Journal of the History of Ideas
Education: 

B.A. Michigan State University

A.M., Ph.D. The University of Michigan

College Hall 319B
moyer@sas.upenn.edu
215 898.4957

Ann Moyer specializes in the intellectual and cultural history of Renaissance Europe, especially sixteenth-century Italy. She is completing a book on the study of culture and the formation of cultural identity in sixteenth-century Tuscany.

Research Interests: 

History of Italy

Intellectual and Cultural History

Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 030 The Emergence of Europe
  • HIST 054 Books that Made History
  • HIST 201 Historians at Work: an Introduction to Historiography 
  • HIST 143 Foundations of European Thought
  • HIST 230 Florence in History
  • HIST 230 The City of Rome: From Constantine to the Borgias
  • HIST 308 Renaissance Europe
  • HIST 342 European Intellectual History, 1300 - 1600
  • HIST 422 Science and Culture in the West: from the Greeks to Galileo
  • HIST 620 A History of Cultural History: The Renaissance
  • HIST 620 The Presence of the Past: Readings in European Cultural History
  • HIST 620 European Intellectual History, 1300 - 1600
  • HIST 700 The Study of History
  • HIST 720 Research in Medieval and Early Modern History

Octavia M. Carr

Administrative Coordinator
Education: 

B.A., Criminal Justice, Temple University (2012) 

M.S.Ed. Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania (Anticipated May 2019) 

208 College Hall
215-898-8453 (p)
215-573-2089 (f)

Email: octaviac@sas.upenn.edu

 

 

Thomas Max Safley

Early modern Europe, economy, society and religion
Professor of History
Faculty Fellow, Harrison College House
College Hall 309A
tsafley@history.upenn.edu
215 898.2186

Thomas Max Safley is Professor of Early Modern European History. A specialist in the economic and social history of early modern Europe, roughly 1450-1750, he has published extensively on the histories of marriage and the family, poverty and charity and labor and business.

Courses Taught: 
  • HIST 001 Europe In A Wider World
  • HIST 002 Europe In A Wider World
  • HIST 040 Early Modern Europe, 1450 - 1750
  • HIST 123 Economic History of Europe
  • HIST 202 Economic Thought to Smith
  • HIST 211 Banks & Bankers
  • HIST 309 Europe in the Age of the Reformation
  • HIST 310 Europe in the Age of the Baroque

Sample History Event

Fri, 05/24/2013 - 7:00pm
Franklin Field

Sample event description.

A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan

2003
University of California

This incisive study adds a new dimension to discussions of Egypt's nationalist response to the phenomenon of colonialism as well as to discussions of colonialism and nationalism in general. Eve M. Troutt Powell challenges many accepted tenets of the binary relationship between European empires and non-European colonies by examining the triangle of colonialism marked by Great Britain, Egypt, and the Sudan.

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